Otherwise Known as Sheila the Great

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Overview

"Sheila manages to survive the episodic trials of the summer--the beginners' swimming test, the revelations of her friends' Slam Books, even the presence of the dog who 'goes with' the Tubmans' rented summer home....Sheila's ongoing crisis of image is as easy to identify with as it is to laugh at."--Kirkus Reviews.

A summer in Tarrytown, New York, is a lot of fun for ten-year-old Sheila even though her friends make her face up to ...

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This is the OVERSIZED softcover stated Dell Edition from March 1979. Other than a missing cover, numerous dog-ears from storage, and wear to a few page edges, the book is in ... well-worn but excellent reading condition. There are no markings, etc.---and the pages and binding are tight (see photo). **Note: All books listed as FIRST EDITIONS are stated by the publisher in words or number lines--or--only stated editions that include only the publisher and publication date. Check my feedback to see that I sell exactly as I describe. Read more Show Less

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Overview

"Sheila manages to survive the episodic trials of the summer--the beginners' swimming test, the revelations of her friends' Slam Books, even the presence of the dog who 'goes with' the Tubmans' rented summer home....Sheila's ongoing crisis of image is as easy to identify with as it is to laugh at."--Kirkus Reviews.

A summer in Tarrytown, New York, is a lot of fun for ten-year-old Sheila even though her friends make her face up to some self-truths she does not want to admit.

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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 3-6Author Judy Blume reads this lively recording of her novel (Dutton, pap. 1972), and her voice perfectly personifies Sheila's scrappiness and bravado. Listeners will be drawn easily into the familiar story of Sheila's summer escapadescity kid transplanted to the suburbs where she's forced to deal with her fears and misconceptions about dogs, swimming, and not being the preeminent know-it-all she always thought she was. When she and Mouse Ellis become friends, Sheila learns that saving face is not necessary to keep a friendship. The story harkens back to the time when children lived with two parents in cozy neighborhoods and met in the afternoons at the pool. Listeners will be charmed by the story's strong female heroine and will happily follow Sheila through her summer adventures.Marcia Brightman, Mark's Meadow Laboratory School, Amherst, MA
From the Publisher
"Sheila's ongoing crisis of image is as easy to identify with as it is to laugh at."--Kirkus Reviews

From the Trade Paperback edition.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780440467014
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 3/15/1976
  • Series: Fudge Series
  • Edition description: REISSUE
  • Pages: 118
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 590L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.12 (w) x 7.48 (h) x 0.36 (d)

Meet the Author

Judy Blume is the enduringly popular author of more than twenty books for young readers. Over 75 million copies of her books have been sold, and the Fudge books are timeless classics. Among Ms. Blume's many awards are the Margaret A. Edwards Award for Lifetime Achievement and the 2004 National Book Foundation's Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. She lives with her husband, George Cooper, in Key West, Florida.

Biography

Before Judy Blume, there may have been a handful of books that spoke to issues teens could identify with; but very few were getting down to nitty-gritty stuff like menstruation, masturbation, parents divorcing, being half-Jewish, or deciding to have sex. Now, these were some issues that adolescents could dig into, and Blume’s ability to address them realistically and responsibly has made her one of the most popular – and most banned – authors for young adults.

Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret, published in 1970, was Blume’s third book and the one that established her fan base. Drawing on some of the same things she faced as a sixth grader growing up in Elizabeth, New Jersey, Blume created a sympathetic, first-person portrait of a girl whose family moves to the suburbs as she struggles with puberty and religion. In subsequent classics such as Then Again, Maybe I Won’t, Deenie, Blubber, and Tiger Eyes, Blume wrote about the pain of being different, falling in love, and figuring out one's identity. Usually written in a confessional/diary style, Blume’s books feel like letters from friends who just happen to be going through a very interesting version of the same tortures suffered by their audience.

Blume has also accumulated a great following among the 12-and-under set with her Fudge series, centering on the lives of preteen Peter Hatcher and his hilariously troublesome younger brother, Farley (a.k.a. Fudge). Blume’s books in this category are particularly adept at portraying the travails of siblings, making both sides sympathetic. Her 2002 entry, Double Fudge, takes a somewhat surreal turn, providing the Hatchers with a doppelganger of Fudge when they meet some distant relatives on a trip.

Blume has also had success writing for adults, again applying her ability to turn some of her own sensations into compelling stories. Wifey in 1978 was the raunchy chronicle of a bored suburban housewife’s infidelities, both real and imagined. She followed this up five years later with Smart Women, a novel about friendship between two divorced women living in Colorado; and 1998’s Summer Sisters, also about two female friends.

Blume has said she continually struggles with her writing, often sure that each book will be the last, that she’ll never get another idea. She keeps proving herself wrong with more than 20 books to her credit; hopefully she will continue to do so.

Good To Know

Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing was inspired by an article given to Blume by her babysitter about a toddler who swallowed a small pet turtle. She wrote a picture book introducing Fudge (based on her own then-toddler son), the turtle, and older brother Peter; but it was rejected. A few years later, E. P. Dutton editor Ann Durell suggested that Blume turn the story into a longer book about the Hatcher family. Blume did, and the Fudge legacy was born.

Blume is not an author without conflict about her station in life. She says on her web site that, as part of her "fantasy about having a regular job," she has a morning routine that involves getting fully dressed and starting at 9 a.m. She has also getting out of writing altogether."After I had written more than ten books I thought seriously about quitting," she writes. "I felt I couldn't take the loneliness anymore. I thought I would rather be anything but a writer. But I've finally come to appreciate the freedom of writing. I accept the fact that it's hard and solitary work."

Blume's book about divorce, It's Not the End of the World, proved ultimately to be closer to her own experience than she originally imagined. Her own marriage was in trouble at the time, but she couldn't quite face it. "In the hope that it would get better I dedicated this book to my husband," she writes in an essay. "But a few years later, we, too, divorced. It was hard on all of us, more painful than I could have imagined, but somehow we muddled through and it wasn't the end of any of our worlds, though on some days it might have felt like it."

Her most autobiographical book is Starring Sally J. Friedman as Herself, says Blume. "Sally is the kind of kid I was at ten," Blume says on her web site.

Blume keeps setting Fudge aside, readers keep bringing him back. The sequel Superfudge was written after tons of fans wrote in asking for more of Farley Hatcher; again more begging led to Fudge-a-Mania ten years later. Blume planned never to write about Fudge again, but grandson Elliott was a persistent pesterer (just like Fudge), and got his way with 2002's Double Fudge.

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    1. Hometown:
      New York's Upper East Side, Key West, and Martha's Vineyard
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 12, 1938
    2. Place of Birth:
      Elizabeth, New Jersey
    1. Education:
      B.S. in education, New York University, 1961
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Otherwise Known as Sheila the Great


By JUDY BLUME

PUFFIN BOOKS

Copyright © 1972 Judy Blume
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0142302287


Chapter One

I'm glad there's only one more week of school before summer vacation. Today was so hot! My clothes stuck to me and my brain felt all tired out. I didn't even finish my math in school. So now I have to do it for homework.

I walked into the lobby of my apartment building thinking how good a big, cold drink would taste. I pushed the Up elevator button and waited. When the elevator got to the lobby Henry opened the gate and I stepped in. Just as he was about to take me upstairs Peter Hatcher and his dumb old dog came tearing down the hall.

"Wait up, Henry!" Peter called. "Here I come."

"Please don't wait, Henry," I said. "The elevator's too small for that dog."

But Henry opened the gate and waited. "This elevator can hold ten people or the equivalent," Henry said. "And I figure that dog is the equivalent of a person and a half. So with me and you and Peter and that dog we've still only got four and a half people."

Sometimes I wish Henry didn't spend so much time thinking.

"Hi, Henry," Peter said. "Thanks for waiting."

"Any time, Peter," Henry told him.

"Excuse me, please," I said, stepping out of the elevator. I held my nose. "I can't ride up with that dog. He stinks!"

My heart was beating so loud I was sure Henry and Peter could hear it. And I know Turtle, the dog, was laughing at me. He stuck out his tongue and licked the corners of his mouth. I'll bet he could taste me already! I walked down the hall with my head held high, saying, "P.U."

Henry called, "Ten flights up is a long walk, Sheila."

"I don't mind," I called back.

Henry was right. Ten flights up is a long walk. By the time I got to my floor I was huffing and puffing so hard I had to sit down on the landing and rest. Little drips of sweat ran from my face down to my neck. Still, I think it's pretty smart of me to pretend that I hate Turtle because he smells. I always hold my nose when I see Peter coming with him. That way Peter will never know the truth!

After a few minutes I wiped my face with the back of my hand and walked down the hall to our apartment. Mrs. Reese is the only person on our floor with a dog. And I don't worry too much about her. Because her dog is so small she carries him around in her arms. She calls him Baby and knits him little sweaters to wear in the winter.

I pushed open our apartment door and went straight into the kitchen to get something to drink.

"Is that you, Sheila?" my mother called.

"Yes," I answered.

"Did you have fun at Laurie's?"

"Yes," I said, gulping down a whole can of apple juice.

"Is it still hot out?" Mom asked.

"Yes."

"Did you remember to bring home a quart of milk?"

Oh oh! I knew I forgot something.

"Sheila ... did you bring home the milk?" Mom called again.

"No ... I forgot."

I went into the living room then. My mother was reading a book. The CD player was on and my sister Libby was twirling around in her pink toe slippers. She is thirteen and thinks she's a great ballerina. I could hold my nose for the way Libby dances, but I'd get into big trouble if I did.

My mother said, "You better go back down and get the milk, Sheila."

I flopped into the big chair that tilts back and said, "I can't, Mom. I'm dead. I just walked up the stairs."

"Don't tell me the elevator is out of order!" Mom said.

"No."

"Then why did you walk up ten flights of stairs?"

"I don't know," I said. "I just felt like it."

"Sheila, that was a very foolish thing to do in this heat," Mom told me. "Now go into your room and lie down for a while before supper."

"Do I have to?" I asked.

"Yes, you do. Libby will go to the store and get the milk."

Libby did three flying leaps before she said, "Can't you see I'm in the middle of a routine?"

"Your routine can wait," Mom said. "I need the milk for supper and Daddy will be home soon."

"But, Mother! I'm in my leotard," Libby said.

Libby used to say Mom, like me. But since she started junior high it's Mother this and Mother that. She is very strange.

Mom told Libby, "You can put a skirt over your leotard and nobody will notice." Then she looked at me. "Sheila, what are you waiting for? I said go and lie down."

"Okay ... okay," I said. "I'm going." I took off my shoes and arranged them on the floor so that the toes pointed toward my bedroom.

I line them up every day before my father comes home. It's part of a private game Daddy and I play. I am always hiding somewhere and Daddy has to find me. His only clue is my shoes. I invented this game when I was seven and we've been playing it ever since.

Libby said when she was ten she acted a lot more grown-up than me. I think she missed out on some good fun. Anyway, Daddy would be disappointed if I stopped playing our game.

Libby and I share a bedroom. I stretched out on my bed while Libby turned the closet upside down looking for a skirt.

"You are a pain!" she said to me. "You know that, Sheila? You are a real live pain!"

I didn't answer her.

"Why'd you walk up the stairs ... huh?"

I still didn't answer.

"Did you see a dog in the elevator? I'll bet that's it. I'll bet Mrs. Reese was in the elevator with Baby."

"Wrong!" I said.

Libby finally found a skirt and pulled it on over her leotard. "Then I'll bet it was Peter Hatcher and Turtle."

"Maybe it was and maybe it wasn't," I said.

"Chicken chicken chicken," Libby called as she left.

I put my hands over my ears to show I wasn't even listening.

Libby got back with the milk right before Daddy got home for supper. I jumped off my bed and crawled under it when I heard him say, "Hello, I'm home."

I knew Daddy found my shoes when he called, "Ah ha! I'm coming to find a Sheila!"

It really isn't very hard for him to find me. There aren't that many places where I can hide. We only have five rooms. Still, Daddy always pretends that he doesn't have any idea where I might be.

When he came into my room he started opening my dresser drawers. He said, "Hmmm, no Sheila in here. No Sheila in there either."

I laughed. Daddy knows I wouldn't fit into a dresser drawer. And as soon as I laughed he lifted my bedspread and looked under the bed.

"Ah ha! I found a Sheila!"

I crawled out and kissed Daddy hello. Libby walked in then. "I don't think you should encourage her to be such a baby," she told Daddy.

"I am not a baby!" I shouted.

"Then why don't you stop playing baby games?" Libby asked.

"All right, Libby," Daddy said. "That's enough!"

"You see," Libby said. "You're always on her side!"

"I'm not on anyone's side," Daddy said. "Let's forget about this and go have our supper. I've got some news for you."

I was sure Daddy's news would be about our summer plans. We've been waiting and waiting to find out what we're going to do this summer. I wanted to take a trip to Disneyland but Mom and Daddy said That's out of the question.

When we sat down at the table and started to eat Daddy said, "We got the house!"

"Oh, Buzz," Mom said. "That's wonderful!"

I wish people would stop calling my father Buzz and start calling him Bertram. That's his real name. I feel so silly having a father named Buzz.

"What house?" Libby asked.

"In Tarrytown," Daddy told her. "It belongs to a professor at Marymount who's spending the summer in England."

My father is a professor at Marymount College too. He teaches English. Libby says when she is old enough to go to college she is not going to Marymount because there aren't enough boys around there. Libby thinks boys are very important. Libby is sick!

"It sounds nice," Mom said. "Anything's better than the city in July and August."

"I hope there's something to do in Tarrytown," Libby said. "I really wanted to go to the beach this summer."

I happen to know that is because Libby has a new bikini and she wants to show it off.

"You'll like Tarrytown," Daddy told Libby. "There's a pool down the road from our house and there's a very good day camp...."

Libby interrupted. "I'm much too old for day camp, Father! You know that."

"Not this one," Daddy said. "It's special. You can't even go if you're not at least ten. It's a cultural arts camp."

"I'm no good at art, Father. You know that too," Libby said.

"Art includes theater, music, and dancing," Daddy told her.

"Dancing?" Libby asked.

Then Mom and Daddy got these big smiles on their faces. I'm sure they knew all along that Libby would be very happy once she found out she could spend the summer on her dumb old toes!

"Oh, Father ... oh, Mother!" Libby cried.

"I wanted to go to Disneyland," I said.

"We told you that was out of the question," Mom said.

"I know. But I still wanted to go."

"In Tarrytown you can have your own bedroom," Daddy said.

"I can?"

"Yes. There are four bedrooms in Professor Egran's house."

I thought that over. My own bedroom. That sounded pretty good.

"And you can learn to swim," Mom said.

"I don't want to learn to swim," I told her.

"We'll see," she said. "We don't have to decide now."

"Can my bedroom be far away from Libby's?"

"We'll see about that too," Mom said. "Now finish your string beans."

The next day I told Peter Hatcher, "I'm going away for the whole summer. I'm going to have my own bedroom."

"Goody for you!" he said.

"So you don't have to wash your dog. Because I won't be around to tell you how bad he smells!"

"My dog said to tell you he thinks you smell too," Peter said. Then he went off with Jimmy Fargo and they both laughed and laughed. They think they're so funny! I don't know why I used to waste my time playing "cooties" with them. Maybe next year I'll get lucky. Maybe Peter Hatcher and Jimmy Fargo won't be in my fifth-grade class.

I met Mrs. Reese in the hall. "I'm going away for the whole summer," I said. "I'm going to have my own bedroom, with flowered wallpaper and frilly curtains and little lamps shaped like candles."

And she said, "Aren't you lucky! Baby would like to go away too, but he doesn't have any place to go."

I told Henry I'd be away for two whole months. "I'm going to sleep in my own bedroom, in my own canopy bed!"

Henry said, "I'll really miss you, Sheila. Who's going to remind me how many people the elevator can hold?"

Henry and I laughed together. "And did I tell you about the rug on my bedroom floor?" I asked.

"No," Henry said. "You didn't mention that."

"Well, it's very soft and fluffy and it's all yellow except for a big red rose right in the center. It feels so good on your feet you never have to wear slippers. Not all summer long."

"That sounds mighty nice, Sheila."

I thought so too. The more I talked about it the better is sounded. Spending the summer in the country. Spending the summer in Tarrytown. Spending the summer in a house. Spending the summer in my own beautiful bedroom!

It started to sound almost as good as going to Disneyland. I didn't even mind the packing and the ride to Tarrytown. I couldn't wait to see the house. I couldn't wait to see my bedroom.

And then I found out about Jennifer.

Chapter Two

Jennifer is small with brown and white spots and long ears. When Libby saw her she cried, "Oh, what an adorable dog!"

"She comes with the house," Daddy said. "She belongs to Professor Egran and she's ours for the summer."

"I'm going back to the car," I said.

Daddy held my arm. "She can't hurt you."

"Oh sure," I said, pulling away from him. "But I'll just wait in the car until you decide what to do with her. Because I'm not staying here if she does!" I ran down the road, jumped into our car, and started to shake. How could they do this to me? Their own child. Their own younger daughter. Didn't they understand? Didn't they care?

Daddy and Mom hurried to the car. Mom stuck her head in the open window. "Sheila," she said, "Jennifer is very small. She's more afraid of you than you are of her."

"Did she tell you that?" I asked.

Daddy said, "She's got a doghouse and a fenced-in area. She's chained up. You don't have to go near her."

"Suppose she gets away?" I asked. "Suppose her chain breaks?"

"That won't happen," Daddy said. "But even if it did, someone would catch her."

"You're just saying that!" I told Daddy. "But you don't mean it."

"Have we ever lied to you?" Mom asked.

"Well ... no."

"Then trust us," Daddy said.

I looked out the car window. Libby was cuddling Jennifer. "You promise she'll never come into the house?"

"I promise," Daddy said. "She's got everything she needs outside."

"And you won't make me go near her?"

"Of course not," Mom said. "You can even pretend she's not there if you want."

"And you won't make fun of me?"

"Do we ever make fun of you?" Daddy asked.

"Libby does," I said.

"We'll see that she doesn't," Mom promised.

"Now, don't you want to come into the house and see your very own bedroom?" Daddy asked.

"Well ... I guess so," I said, getting out of the car.

We walked up the front lawn to the house. Libby was still holding Jennifer. When Jennifer saw me coming she jumped off Libby's lap. She barked and barked.

"You see!" I cried, turning around, ready to run back to the car. "She hates me already!"

"Don't be silly," Daddy said. He took my hand.

"I'm not being silly. Why else would she bark like that?"

"Because she doesn't know you," Mom said, putting an arm around me.

"And she's never going to, either. I'll tell you that!"

We went into the house. The downstairs looked pretty nice, but I wanted to see my bedroom. So Daddy and I went upstairs while Libby and Mom poked around in the kitchen.

Daddy turned right at the top of the stairs and walked down the hall. "Two of the bedrooms are this way and the other two are that way," Daddy said, pointing. "Since you wanted to be far away from Libby I thought you might like this one." Daddy pushed open a door and smiled.

I went in. The first thing I saw was the dresser. It was piled with models of planes, boats, and cars. And the walls were full of team pennants. There wasn't even a bedspread on the bed. Just an ugly old gray blanket with CAMP KENABEC printed across it. I opened the closet door. The shelves were loaded with sports equipment. And where was my soft, fluffy, yellow rug with the big rose in the middle? No place. The floor was bare!

Daddy said, "Well...."

"I hate it!" I shouted, running out of the room, past Daddy, and down the hall. I looked into the other bedrooms. But they were all the same.

"They're all boys' rooms!" I cried.

Continues...


Excerpted from Otherwise Known as Sheila the Great by JUDY BLUME Copyright © 1972 by Judy Blume.
Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 123 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(80)

4 Star

(23)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(10)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 123 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 8, 2012

    Grat love it.

    It is a great book.It has no bad words.I really liked it.

    27 out of 32 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 15, 2009

    Great

    Judy Blume never disappoints my kids - my 10yr old took it to school and her teacher asked to borrow this book to read to the class..

    25 out of 28 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    A fun escape for a 9 year old girl

    My daughter is really enjoying all of the Judy Blume books at this time. She is in third grade and this is a little higher reading level but she is handling it well. She is still able to sound out and keep intouch with the storyline. I feel it is a challenge for her and making her see that she is reaching higher goals. I would recommend it to any child that is into reading or is just beginning. They are really fun books.

    16 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2012

    Love it od

    Like the way Libby sees hot boy and she follows them and way shelia finds new friend she is not trying to act cool she acting nice and kind and she tells the truth.

    15 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2012

    RW SAYS

    Love it..... Libby and her boys who are older than her

    12 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2013

    G

    Otherwise Known As Sheila The Great makes its way into the Fudge series, Shelia is s fun girl who expresses her feelings in a way that makes me feel happy. If your 9 or 90 you have to love the character Judy Blume puts into her books

    8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2008

    a reviewer

    OTHERWISE KNOWN AS SHEILA THE GREAT The book ¿Otherwise Known as Sheila the Great¿ by Judy Blume in an awesome book. The main character is Sheila who is frightened of dogs. They live in the city in an apartment, but for the summer there dad is borrowing a house in the county. But when Sheila and her family get there they meet Jennifer the Dog! But that¿s not the worst problem. She meets friends which sleep over her house. In Sheila¿s room where everyone is sleeping in there tons of airplane models. Also there is a note that says ¿Do Not Touch My Air Plane Models or I Will Get You Some Day!¿ But they smash them into the walls! Also when they play indoor hide and seek in her friend ¿Mouse¿s¿ house. They open a trap door to get inside the house but some one gets stuck! Will Sheila get used to Jennifer? Will Sheila and her friends fix the models? Will Sheila¿s friend get unstuck? This is a great book and I highly recommend it to you to find out the answers.

    8 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2012

    Love

    I like this book

    7 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2011

    Judy blume

    Best book ever

    7 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2012

    Ddddrrtfddvgffffhdfdsdddddcdffgggghyhhnbn

    Its kinda fun to have a friend named sheila.i have a friend named sheila and were reading the otherwise known as sheila the great.

    4 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2012

    Victiria millette

    I hear that it is good

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2012

    Seriously

    Dull, boring. Sheila is not even likable! And is a selfish twit

    4 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2012

    A great book

    This is a great book of the Fudge series because it tells you more about Sheila.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2013

    Awesome book!

    This is a awesome book! It is funny and good.some parts are good some parts are ok. But if you love Judy Blume books then you will this book.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2013

    Cool!

    So funny!!!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2012

    Highly

    One of my favorite books

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2013

    Loved it

    Awesome book would totally recomend it

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2012

    Love it so much thank you

    Lol so great

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2007

    Recommended for girls, but not boys

    Mostly I read this book because I wanted to finish the Fudge series by Judy Blume. I didn't really like it because it was about Sheila - and I am a boy. I didn't like Sheila. Fudge wasn't in this story and that bummed me out. One funny thing happened - when Sheila as running away from Jennifer's friend the dog. Sheila was running away from the dog because she thought the dog was trying to eat her, but the dog was only licking her. Sheila thought she was bleeding and wanted her mom to call a doctor. Then her mother told her it was not blood, it was just saliva.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2013

    I ment to say im a boy

    $$$$$

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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