Otis Dooda: Strange but True [NOOK Book]

Overview


HARDY-HAR-HAR!

Meet Otis Dooda. Yes, that’s his name. Go on and have a good laugh. He’s heard it all before. He’s been called things like Otis Poopy Stink and Otis Toilet Twinkie. That’s right, yuck it up and get it out of your system. We’ll wait.

All right then. This is the story of Otis and the Dooda family (including their rat named Smoochie) moving to New York City, ...
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Otis Dooda: Strange but True

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Overview


HARDY-HAR-HAR!

Meet Otis Dooda. Yes, that’s his name. Go on and have a good laugh. He’s heard it all before. He’s been called things like Otis Poopy Stink and Otis Toilet Twinkie. That’s right, yuck it up and get it out of your system. We’ll wait.

All right then. This is the story of Otis and the Dooda family (including their rat named Smoochie) moving to New York City, and the incredibly strange, but true, things that happened to them. It all started with Otis getting cursed by a guy in a potted plant in their apartment building lobby, and then meeting a bunch of their neighbors, including a farting pony named Peaches who was disguised as a dog. And that was just the first day. 

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Potter (The Humming Room) and debut illustrator Heatley team up for a Wimpy Kid–style illustrated novel that follows the unfortunately named Otis Dooda and his family as they move from a "dinky little town" into an apartment on the 35th floor of Tidwell Towers in New York City. Otis's first days in New York are like something out of Twin Peaks: he's cursed by the "Potted Plant Guy" in the lobby (" ‘Before the next full moon,' the kid said in a voice that sounded like he needed to blow his nose, ‘you will break all your bones' "), a neighboring family keeps an eye-wateringly flatulent horse as a pet, and Otis is certain he sees zombies on the subway. Meanwhile, Otis's zit-picking older brother, Gunther, makes Rodrick Heffley look downright benevolent. Heatley strikes an apt balance between cartoony and creepy in his b&w artwork, and Potter has a firm handle on both Otis's self-effacing, drily funny voice and her audience's love of Legos, bizarre plot developments, and bountiful scatological humor. Ages 7–10. Agent: Alice Tasman, Jean V. Naggar Literary Agency. (June)
From the Publisher
"Heatley strikes an apt balance between cartoony and creepy in his b&w artwork, and Potter has a firm handle on both Otis's self-effacing, drily funny voice and her audience's love of Legos, bizarre plot developments, and bountiful scatological humor."—Publishers Weekly 

 

 "There are plenty of poop and fart jokes, and the black-and-white illustrations add a graphic-novel feel. Give this one to fans of the “Diary of a Wimpy Kid” (Abrams) and “Captain Underpants” (Scholastic) series." — School Library Journal

Children's Literature - Remy Dou
Any young child would know that a last name like "Dooda" will quickly become "Doo-Doo" by the end of the first day of school. Otis realizes this in kindergarten. Unfortunately, things do not get any better for him as he gets older. His family moves to New York City, and before he can even make it into his new apartment, the infamous Potted Plant Guy curses him. Otis, a truly wimpy character, spends the next several days highly anxious, hoping to avoid the curse of having all of his bones broken in some unexpected accident. True to the book's title, a variety of strange characters and circumstances decorate every chapter. Heatley's illustrations bring them to life—for better or for worse. Perhaps hoping to more deeply engage boys, Potter riddles the book with superfluous stink. Poop and flatulence emanate from most chapters. Sometimes the jokes are funny, but often feel contrived. Although the characters are not particularly gripping, the narrative pace picks up about halfway through. Despite the bland ending, young readers—especially reluctant readers—will likely devour this text. Reviewer: Remy Dou
School Library Journal
09/01/2013
Gr 3–5—Potter leaves the more serious nature of The Humming Room (Feiwel & Friends, 2012) behind for this slapstick joyride. Otis Dooda is used to people joking about his name; he's heard it all: Otis Poopy-Stinks, Otis Toilet Twinkie, etc. He's over it. What he's not over is his family's move from the country to the 35th floor of an apartment in New York City. His older, rat-loving brother, Gunther, is a source of annoyance and disgust; his mother has a penchant for soy wieners; and his dad shouts, "Rice and beans!" when he's angry. Otis's misadventures begin immediately when he offends the strange kid hiding in a potted plant on the apartment's first floor. The "Potted Plant Guy" hands out a curse: Otis will break all his bones by the next full Moon. Foiling the curse drives the youngster throughout the story, with plenty of odd things happening along the way. He meets Perry, the owner of a miniature horse with a gas problem; Cat, who has siblings named Linus, Lucy, and Hobbes; and Lola and Noodle, poodles dyed pink and blue. There are plenty of poop and fart jokes, and the black-and-white illustrations add a graphic-novel feel. Give this one to fans of the "Diary of a Wimpy Kid" (Abrams) and "Captain Underpants" (Scholastic) series.—Jamie Kallio, Orland Park Public Library, IL
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781250011787
  • Publisher: Feiwel & Friends
  • Publication date: 6/4/2013
  • Series: Otis Dooda Series
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 1,180,854
  • Age range: 7 - 10 Years
  • File size: 12 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author


Meet Ellen Potter. She’s the author of Otis Dooda and is known for her bestselling Olivia Kidney series, as well as her star-studded novels The Kneebone Boy and The Humming Room. She swears that everything in this novel is absolutely not true, but we’re still looking for the poodles of mass destruction. Read it for yourself.

Meet David Heatley. He drew all the pictures for Otis Dooda. When he’s not writing songs or playing with Legos or daydreaming, he creates art for magazines, books, and Web sites all over the world, including The New Yorker, The New York Times, and Nickelodeon magazine. This is his first book for kids.
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Read an Excerpt

HARDY-HAR-HAR

 

Okay, let’s just get this over with. My name is Otis Dooda.

Go on. Laugh. I’ve heard it all before. People call me all sorts of things. When I was in kindergarten, kids called me Otis Doo-Doo. But as I got older, they got more creative. I’ve been called:

Finished laughing? No?

That’s very mature of you.

Well, get it out of your system.

I’ll wait.

Done? Okay, let’s move on.

Except for my name, I’m pretty “sort of.” I’m sort of skinny and sort of short. I’m sort of good at soccer and sort of bad at math. In other words, I’m sort of average. I lived a sort of average life, too. But then, this summer, my father started a new job, which meant we all had to move to New York City. That’s when my life became sort of crazy.

Everything I’m about to tell you is true.

Strange but true.

HOW I KNOW THAT MY BROTHER IS A DOOFUS

When our moving van pulled up in front of Tidwell Towers my mouth popped open. The apartment building we were going to live in was thirty-five stories tall and made of shiny white blocks. It looked exactly like it had been built out of giant white Lego bricks.

I said.

My older brother, Gunther, sneered at me. “You think it looks like it’s built out of giant white Lego bricks, don’t you?”

“No.”

“Admit it, Lego Nerd,” he said. He placed his foot on mine and started to press down.

“You’re wrong,” I said.

Gunther squashed my foot even more.

he demanded.

“Because you remind me of a Clydesdale horse, with those big hairy feet of yours,” I said.

Gunther’s foot pressed down harder and he grinned. His teeth are really tiny. It’s like his baby teeth never grew into his teenaged body. Much like his brains.

“Remove your hoof,” I told him.

He pressed harder until I almost started to squeal.

Luckily, at that moment our dad said,

I grabbed my backpack, which was stuffed with Lego bricks, comics, and Pokémon cards. I carried my most valuable item in my hand: a Lego lie detector, which I had just finished building the week before. It’s made with Legos, a motor, and a wire connected to a tinfoil finger strap. It really works, too. The reason that I know this is that I tried it out on my mother. I hooked her up and asked her if she secretly thought Gunther was a giant doofus. She said, “Of course not,” but the lie detector buzzed,

which means she was lying. Then she turned all red in the face and took off the finger strap and said, “Let’s not call each other doofuses, shall we?”

Mom examined Gunther and me before we went into the building. She mashed down my hair and she made Gunther put a cover over the cage of his pet rat, Smoochie. She’s all excited about moving to the city, but she’s worried that people will think we’re a bunch of hillbillies. That’s because we come from a dinky little town called Hog’s Head. Plus, I think we may be hillbillies, because Gunther and I whiz off the back porch when the weather is nice.

The apartment building’s glass doors slid open as we walked up to them. That was kind of cool, like we were moving into a Price Chopper Supermarket. In the building’s lobby was a doorman. He was as burly as a football player. His head was totally bald and he had an earring in one ear. He looked like a nicely dressed pirate. Frankly, he was a little scary. But when my dad told him we were the Doodas he smiled. It was a wide flash of smile. I decided that I might like him.

“Welcome,” he said. “My name is Julius. And these”—he held up a pair of shining keys and shook them—“are for apartment 35B.”

“You mean we’re going to live on the thirty-fifth floor?” I cried.

“Yup,” Dad said.

“We were keeping that part a surprise,” Mom said.

“Sweet!” said Gunther.

I think they were glad to see Gunther excited. When Dad first told us he got a new job in New York City and we were all moving, Gunther wasn’t too happy about it. He has this girlfriend back in Hog’s Head. Her name is Pandora. She picks at her scalp. Gunther picks at his pimples. They’re like Romeo and Juliet, only more disgusting.

As for me, I was happy to be moving away from Hog’s Head. A few months ago something really bad happened to me there. I’m not sure if I’m going to tell you about it or not.

We’ll just see how things go.

 

Text copyright © 2013 by Ellen Potter.

Illustrations copyright © 2013 by David Heatley

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  • Posted November 4, 2013

    Otis Dooda and his family have moved from the small town of Hog¿

    Otis Dooda and his family have moved from the small town of Hog’s Head, to the big city of New York.  They live on the top floor of Tidwell Towers, neighboring a girl whose bedroom is on the ceiling, a boy who has a rare “French Gerbil Hound” (It’s really a miniature horse/pony, but the apartment doesn’t take horses, but it takes dogs), and some weird old lady. And it doesn’t help that there is some strange lady named “Ms. Yabby” who writes news that goes on in the Towers, called the Tidwell Tidbits – and, the fact is, most of it isn’t true, just rumors and gossip. That’s a problem, especially when it targets a new family in the Towers… The Doodas! And, apparently, Otis is cursed by a guy hiding in a potted plant, saying that Otis will break all of his bones before the next full-moon. Otis finds out that the weird potted plant guy’s predictions ALWAYS come true. What can a kid do?

    I will say that I am a fan of Ellen Potter. I have read Spilling Ink and Slob. Ms. Potter didn’t disappoint me with Otis Dooda! It is a hilarious book! I really like the unrealistic (but possible) things that happen – it actually makes the story even more hilarious! I like the cannon that shoots you into a giant vat of marshmallow fluff, and Peaches (the horse/dog/rodent :) ). The illustrations are pretty funny, realistic, and they are incorporated into the text, similar to  Diary of a Wimpy Kid, or Big Nate. The illustration style of the book makes it more fun to read. Otis Dooda is great character and I LOVED reading about him. He makes some really dumb decisions in the book (but what kid doesn’t) that leads to hilarious outcomes! This is a great story that is guaranteed to make young boys (and girls) laugh out loud (I’m a BIG boy, and I sure laughed out loud! :D )! I am already waiting for Book 2.
    *NOTE I Got A Free Copy Of This Book In Exchange For An Honest Review.

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