Otto's Backwards Day: Toon Books Level 3
  • Otto's Backwards Day: Toon Books Level 3
  • Otto's Backwards Day: Toon Books Level 3

Otto's Backwards Day: Toon Books Level 3

by Frank Cammuso
     
 

Someone stole Otto’s birthday! When Otto and his robot sidekick, Toot, follow the crook, they discover a topsy-turvy world where rats chase cats and people wear underpants over their clothes. To get his presents back, Otto needs to solve a slew of backwards puzzles — but his greatest challenge comes at the journey’s very end. On this special day,

…  See more details below

Overview

Someone stole Otto’s birthday! When Otto and his robot sidekick, Toot, follow the crook, they discover a topsy-turvy world where rats chase cats and people wear underpants over their clothes. To get his presents back, Otto needs to solve a slew of backwards puzzles — but his greatest challenge comes at the journey’s very end. On this special day, will Otto discover something even better than cake or gifts?

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Five years after Otto’s Orange Day, Cammuso and Lynch return with Otto the cat’s second adventure. Luckily for Otto, his birthday is tomorrow; unluckily, someone has stolen his gifts. Catching a glimpse of the thief, Otto follows the perpetrator into Professor Barkwords’s doghouse laboratory. Readers get a crash course in palindromes (and what’s really important where birthdays are concerned) as Otto travels through the professor’s gateway to “the backwards world... a world very much like our own, except that everything is backwards, topsy-turvy,” Barkwords explains. Otto will be fine there, since his name is a palindrome, and so will his companion, a robot named Toot who can transform into a race car and kayak (palindromes, as well). The oddities of the backwards world provide fast-paced thrills as Otto and Toot are pursued by the “star rats” police force (“Rats chasing a cat! That is backwards!” quips Otto) and find out who stole Otto’s birthday loot. There’s a message about the importance of friends and family underlying the story, but Cammuso’s action-packed cartooning keeps the emphasis on fun. Ages 4–8. (Aug.)
Children's Literature - Raina Sedore
Someone stole Otto's birthday! This wrong must be righted! Otto and his buddy Toot the Robot follow the birthday thief to a land that is Backwards. Backwards worlds are not a new concept, and rules for Backwards society are as various as the number of Backwards-verses. In this particular Backwards world, you get in trouble for picking up the trash, Sphinx-like creatures answer questions instead of asking them, and Toot can transform into any item with a name that is a palindrome. Overlaying this wacky world is a lesson about valuing loot more than the people who surround you. The execution of this comic book is colorful and fun. The page layouts vary significantly, and occasionally the text goes into rhyme. Although Otto's emotional journey is a bit pat and the backward elements of the alternate world seem arbitrary, young readers will enjoy the unpredictability and word play in this friendly adventure. Toon books do an exceptional job of laying out the criteria for the three levels of reading they target. The entire catalog is recommended. Reviewer: Raina Sedore
School Library Journal
11/01/2013
Gr 1–4—Otto is in for another crazy adventure when he stumbles upon preparations for his own surprise birthday party. Greed takes over, and he wants his party right then and there. His mother reminds him that all of his friends are coming the next day, his real birthday, but he doesn't care. He thinks cake, ice cream, balloons, and gifts are the most important parts of a celebration and not his family and friends. "I think you've got things backwards," says his father, and the young cat learns that there is more to a birthday than sweets and treats. Cammuso and Lynch are masterful at creating a comic that will appeal to children while at the same time imparting a simple lesson. The illustrations are colorful and attractive. The story is laid out in easy-to-follow panels that will allow even beginning readers to follow it. Otto will find an audience among fans of Ashley Spires's Binky the Space Cat (Kids Can, 2009) and Nadja Spiegelman's "Zig and Wikki" books (Toon).—Carol Hirsche, Provo City Library, UT
Kirkus Reviews
A quick trip to the "backwards world" straightens out Otto the cat's priorities as well as his spelling. Having blithely announced that birthdays are more about cake, ice cream, balloons and, especially, gifts than family and friends, Otto is understandably peeved when all his party trappings are stolen. Following the thief through a gateway dubbed "the Palindrome" leads Otto to a cube-shaped world. There, garbage is dropped on the ground rather than in cans, and clothes are reversed ("Maybe next time you'll listen to your mom and wear clean underwear," snarks companion robot Toot). An adventuresome chase leads to the lair of Evil Olive--a tubby, green gent in the bright, cleanly drawn cartoon illustrations, topped with a red fez in place of a pimiento. Strewn with palindromes and reversed words that even emergent readers will have no trouble decoding, the miniodyssey leaves Otto in the right place: back home, partying with newly appreciated friends and family until latest invitee Evil Olive arrives with the stolen goodies. A snappy follow-up to Otto's Orange Day (2008), gift-wrapped around a worthy theme and frosted with tasty wordplay. (Graphic early reader. 5-7)

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781935179337
Publisher:
TOON Books
Publication date:
08/06/2013
Series:
Toon Series
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
573,473
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
180L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Frank Cammuso lives in Syracuse, New York, where he writes and draws the graphic novel series Knights of the Lunch Table, a middle-school version of the King Arthur tales. He is also the writer and illustrator of the forthcoming series The Misadventures of Salem Hyde. His writing has appeared in The New Yorker, the New York Times, The Village Voice, and on Slate.

Jay Lynch lives in upstate New York. He is the founder of Bijou Funnies, one of the first and most important underground comics of the sixties, and for many years wrote the weekly syndicated comic strip Phoebe & the Pigeon People. He has helped create some of Topps’s most popular humor products, such as Wacky Packages and Garbage Pail Kids.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >