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Oumou
     

Oumou

by Oumou Sangare
 
Fans of Mali's Songbird, Oumou Sangaré, have been waiting for new music from this charismatic singer - it's been nearly seven years since Worotan, after all. But her dearth of recordings is made up for with this two-CD set, comprising a best-of from her three World Circuit albums from the '90s and 8 other songs, some from a Malian

Overview

Fans of Mali's Songbird, Oumou Sangaré, have been waiting for new music from this charismatic singer - it's been nearly seven years since Worotan, after all. But her dearth of recordings is made up for with this two-CD set, comprising a best-of from her three World Circuit albums from the '90s and 8 other songs, some from a Malian recording which was never released internationally. One, "Mogo Te Diya Bee Ye," dates from 1994 and is classic wassoulou music: a hypnotic melody cycles through hunter's harp (kamalengoni) and metal scrapers while Oumou characteristically speaks her mind; the chorus repeating "You can't please everyone." It's followed by the jarring "Magnoumako," one of six songs from the cassette-only Malian release, Laban. This is Malian radio music, a side of Sangaré that international fans seldom see. Drippy keyboards distract momentarily from this song Sangaré wrote about her mother's abandonment with six hungry children. But her soaring voice and the sure rhythms of guitarist Baba Salah more than compensate for the uncharacteristically overproduced track. "Yala," which kicks off with a keyboard/guitar/kamalengoni mix reminiscent of Stevie Wonder's "Master Blaster (Jammin')," seems to crackle forth like some sub-Saharan radio broadcast, with an insistent electronic dance beat and horns. The electronics are in effect on a remix of "Djorolen" and "Ne Bi Fe" which sound like Portishead on a trip to Bamako. At the other end of the spectrum is "Wayeina," a traditional song from Mali's north and a concert staple. The style is similar to that of the north's favorite son, Ali Farka Touré; dry and evocative of the hardscrabble landscape, it features another virtuoso turn by Baba Salah and njurka (one-string fiddle). Likewise, "Maladon" is rich with strings, with a sunny, Bollywood feeling. "Laban," which Sangaré's own insightful album notes describe as a big hit in Mali, is spot-on, though, and those who have not heard the 12 previously released, remastered tracks here will find a worthy introduction to their new favorite African singer.

Product Details

Release Date:
05/09/2006
Label:
World Circuit
UPC:
0769233006721
catalogNumber:
67
Rank:
91258

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