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Our Industrial Utopia and Its Unhappy Citizens
     

Our Industrial Utopia and Its Unhappy Citizens

by David Hilton Wheeler
 
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This is an OCR edition with typos.

Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940027127824
Publisher:
A.C. McClurg and company
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
525 KB

Read an Excerpt


T CHAPTER III. COMPETITION IN UTOPIA. I. HE economic man is one of the burdens of discontented Utopian hearts. They desire the philanthropic man, and they regard the economic man as a coarse and brutal "supplanter" of their ideal. And thus economics and philanthropy come into collision; and as we are all philanthropists by profession, since the love of our fellows is the cult of our generation, it happens that a system of industrial and commercial life whose springs are in self interest becomes odious to all men whose hearts are in the right place. The difference between the two kinds of man is more a matter of feeling than of reality, but the wide difference in names and definitions assists feeling in excavating the chasm which it deplores The reality of things and their relations compels the economic man to help his fellows, and no man can help his fellows until he has first helped himself. If he is to render physical service he must have developed his own body and eaten his own dinners and learned the use of his own hands. If he is to render intellectual aid, he must first cultivate, strengthen and inform his own mind. If he is to bestow money or lands upon others, he must first obtain them by his own industry and thrift. If he is to be a devoted citizen he must build up in his own selfhood something worth the acceptance of his country. So the economic man is by force of simple, natural necessity the predecessor, if not the father, of the philanthropic man. Proceeding to a closer survey of the economic man we perceive at once that he is a rational creature, striving to put his powers to the best use. He produces under the most favorable conditions. If he is a fisherman hesearches out the streams where good fish are most abundant. If he is a hunter, he ranges th...

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