Our Last Great Hope: Awakening the Great Commission [NOOK Book]

Overview

Every day we encounter scores of people headed to an eternity without God. What will it take to wake us up to their desperate need for a Savior?

While the earth's time clock ticks away, well-meaning Christians go to church, pay their tithes, and pray for foreign missionaries—going through the motions of Christian life as millions face an eternity without God. If heaven is indeed for real, and only those who have put their faith in Christ will be given entrance, shouldn't we be ...

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Our Last Great Hope: Awakening the Great Commission

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Overview

Every day we encounter scores of people headed to an eternity without God. What will it take to wake us up to their desperate need for a Savior?

While the earth's time clock ticks away, well-meaning Christians go to church, pay their tithes, and pray for foreign missionaries—going through the motions of Christian life as millions face an eternity without God. If heaven is indeed for real, and only those who have put their faith in Christ will be given entrance, shouldn't we be making the most of every opportunity to share the Gospel, the last great hope for all the world?

Join pastor Ronnie Floyd as he challenges readers to face reality and begin a global movement to reach the lost. He says, "God is calling us to an awakening regarding his most urgent command found in Matthew 28:19 to go and make disciples of all nations. This Great Commission is the compelling charge given to us with divine authority by our Commander in Chief, Jesus Christ."

Our Last Great Hope will move us beyond casual and theoretical talk about the Great Commission and lead us into a Great Awakening.

“This book could revolutionize the way we think. . . . Read it and be inspired, changed, and equipped.”

—Bruce Wilkinson, best-selling author of The Prayer of Jabez

“Floyd challenges us to engage the next generation . . . a must-read.”

—Greg Surratt, lead pastor of Seacoast Church and author of IR-REV-REND

“This book inspires me to do extraordinary things through my most ordinary life. Our Last Great Hope should be your fi rst required read.”

—Leonard Sweet, best-selling author of Jesus Manifesto

Our Last Great Hope pushes us beyond predictability and points us to a deep, intimate knowledge of why we are here.”

—Ed Young Jr., pastor of Fellowship Church and author of OutrageousContagious Joy

“I’ll be pulling this book off my shelf again and again.”

—Pete Wilson, author of Plan B and Empty Promises

“This book is an energizing wake-up call to today’s churches.”

—Ed Stetzer, director of LifeWay Research



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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780849949524
  • Publisher: Nelson, Thomas, Inc.
  • Publication date: 9/6/2011
  • Sold by: THOMAS NELSON
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • File size: 841 KB

Meet the Author

Dr. Ronnie Floyd, senior pastor of Cross Church, Northwest Arkansas, is the author of 19 books and the featured speaker of "Ronnie Floyd," a television program available on a CBS affiliate. In 2001 his church became a multi-campus ministry with messages broadcast live worldwide via the Internet. He is also a featured speaker at various national pastor's and church related conferences. Floyd and his wife, Jeana, have two sons and five grandchildren.
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Read an Excerpt

Our Last Great Hope

AWAKENING THE GREAT COMMISSION
By RONNIE FLOYD

Thomas Nelson

Copyright © 2011 Ronnie Floyd
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-0-8499-4952-4


Chapter One

Face the Truth About yourself

Imagine a group of important leaders calling you into a fancy boardroom. They say, "Okay, we've selected you to be in charge of changing the world forever. Your job is to create a delivery system that will reach every single person in the world. Oh, and it needs to be done yesterday."

Actually, something like that happened to me.

I was humbled, to put it mildly, on the day I received the challenge. I was asked to serve as chairman of the Great Commission Resurgence Task Force of the Southern Baptist Convention. Sure, it sounds like just another church committee. Bureaucratic titles make even the miraculous sound mundane. But there's nothing dull at all about this endeavor—not when you really think about it, not when you truly understand what's at stake on Planet Earth. And I did understand—or at least I thought I did, in the beginning. I knew all about the Great Commission. When Jesus ascended to heaven, He left us with a mandate to penetrate every corner of our world with His message, His offer of salvation from the sin that destroys us. His charge went like this:

Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe everything I have commanded you. And remember, I am with you always, to the end of the age. (Matthew 28:19–20)

The Great Commission had already been my passion; it's the lifeblood of my denomination and of evangelical Christianity. So you can imagine the fire that was lit in my soul when I was asked to chair such a group. The task force involved twenty-two leaders and thinkers with a mandate to study for one year and then bring forward fresh insights about what might be the most effective way we could finally do what we haven't done in two thousand years—penetrate the unreached world with the gospel and make disciples of all the nations. I knew this was the most wonderful, significant opportunity I would ever undertake in my earthly life.

Upon further review, however, I began to feel overwhelmed. I only thought I knew what it meant to fulfill the Great Commission. It's a stated goal that Christian groups throw around almost casually. We voice it all the time, because it's what we all want to do. Now, however, I realized the magnitude of the quest. It was like hearing about the Grand Canyon all your life, maybe seeing a few pictures of it, and then actually standing there at the edge of it for the first time, with the wind whipping at your collar and a great, fiery sunset on the western horizon. There's just no way to be prepared for the awe and wonder. The reality outstrips the simple concept. The Great Commission really is a simple concept:

Tell every person in the world about Jesus Christ and make disciples of all nations.

That's a mission statement so basic a young child can grasp it. But the reality of the Great Commission—well, that's another story, and I had not come to terms with it.

Our task force read widely. We studied. We investigated. As a result, we came to grips with a vast, sprawling, complex, rapidly changing global village. We considered the languages, the cultures, the new opportunities and ancient obstacles of communicating our message to seven billion people, each soul as unique as his or her fingerprints, each one infinitely precious to God. In this "Grand Canyon moment," we were overwhelmed by reality, and we knew we had to be honest with ourselves. We weren't playing games.

Defining the task accurately would be mind-bending. And that was just for starters. We would also have to convince sixteen million Southern Baptists in over forty-five thousand churches that our definition was the right one, and that this endeavor should become the great work of their lives. We would be responsible for making everyone see the reality of this work, while remaining excited about forging ahead with it ourselves. Now do you begin to see why the idea of awakening the Great Commission is staggering?

Jesus said to us in Acts 1:8, in the other great statement of the Commission, "You will be My witnesses in Jerusalem, in all Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth."

He was talking about a ripple effect, ever-expanding circles of massive salvation, each one a new and different demographic reality. Jesus intends us to answer, what is the reality of Jerusalem? of Judea? of Samaria? of your neighborhood, your gender, your generation, your socioeconomic group? Those who came directly after Him—the generation of the apostle Paul—made those ripples happen in spectacular fashion. The first Christians moved across languages and cultures, defying hostility, languages, demonic opposition, and tremendous odds, until our faith won out over the greatest political empire in history, the Roman Empire. The gospel was shared; disciples were made in many nations of that period.

So we know it can be done, and we have at our disposal all kinds of technology and tools that Paul and his fellow missionaries didn't have. But consider the obstacles, even for those who embrace the challenge of defining reality. That technology is a two-edged sword. We live in a world of misinformation. Media reporters and political leaders throw out new falsehoods every day so that we fail to understand our world and even ourselves. A barrage of TV commercials push us toward the belief that personal happiness is tied up in how many toys we own or in how many varieties of physical pleasure we pursue. The opinion makers—their reality has changed too. Their legions have swelled exponentially in our generation through technology, particularly the Internet. Our eyes and ears and minds are constantly filled with the white noise of this blog or that talk show—and so few of those are bound up in the truth we know to be in God's eternal Word. So many opinions, so much advice, yet there is one God and one truth. In the incessant babble of our times, I'm driven to God, to hear the only voice that matters.

I hope your head isn't already spinning. When we discuss awakening the giant, mobilizing the Great Commission for this world at this time, we must start somewhere, and that means, of course, at the most basic level: ourselves. We can't define the reality outside us until we handle what is within. I must therefore begin with myself—and with my God.

A high-Def Mirror

The first battle to be fought is the one for my heart and soul. I know my limitations. I look inside, see how fallen and helpless I am, and know my only hope is to trust Him. There is a wonderful passage in the New Testament that cuts to the heart of this problem of the inconsistencies in my spiritual life:

But be doers of the word and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves. Because if anyone is a hearer of the word and not a doer, he is like a man looking at his own face in a mirror; for he looks at himself, goes away, and right away forgets what kind of man he was. (James 1:22–24)

In this word picture, the man looks into a clear mirror. Mirrors don't lie; they define reality in full color. Let's imagine this man sees a dab of toothpaste stuck to his chin. It makes good sense for him to wipe off the smudge, right? Someone who is not a doer of the Word, James tells us, is like a man just leaving the paste there. He is ignoring the truth that has just been presented to him.

God's Word is a mirror that shows us who we are in high definition. It defines reality with harsh precision. As I read the Bible, I find that this book has me nailed. What all those political leaders, Madison Avenue wizards, and Internet chatterers—even my closest friends—don't understand about me, the Scriptures do. I open the covers, gaze into the reflection, and see myself looking back. The reality of myself. This is why we are disciplined to study our Bibles every morning to prepare for the day spiritually, just as we look into the bathroom mirror to prepare for the day physically.

Reading the Word, I'm humbled. I'm encouraged. I'm strengthened because I know exactly where I stand. But when I finish my morning devotional time, put aside the Bible, and get busy with my day, I'm in danger of losing the reality I've been shown. I need a disciplined mind and will; I must cling to the truth as I begin to walk through this world, knowing that thousands of competing messages—sometimes subtle, always powerful, generally lies—will assault my thinking. If Scripture is a high-definition mirror, then these are fun-house mirrors. They seek to amuse us by telling us agreeable lies about ourselves.

I must admit that I am the source of my share of these competing messages. I am tempted to rationalize my sin, to play games rather than be honest, or to take the easy way out during those defining moments of life, when it's absolutely critical that I know how to be honest with myself. Whether it's some disembodied voice in technology or some inner voice generated by my foolish pride or spiritual laziness, I must ignore the world's lies and follow the Word's truth. Narrow is that path, Jesus tells us, the path of self-honesty; wide is the avenue that leads to destruction (Matthew 7:13–14).

I also need to be aware of my concern for image and perception. Just like you, I want to be loved, accepted, and admired; it's a matter of human nature. But we can become slaves to the approval of others. We want to please other people at all times. For the best and most valid of reasons, we want to please a spouse, a supervisor at work, a leader at church. We want our friends to think highly of us. There's nothing wrong with any of that—until approval becomes our defining reality. Then our quest for approval becomes a lifelong pursuit of fool's gold.

Life is to be lived for an audience of One. Here's an encouraging thought: if I can focus utterly and completely on pleasing God, suddenly life becomes very simple. I've defined my path, and His Word will light that path for every step. I no longer need to listen to all the competing voices out there. I may not please all the people all the time, but I will do my best to live as God wants me to, and that will be my reality. Ultimately we must all make that choice, as Paul did: "For am I now trying to win the favor of people, or God? Or am I striving to please people? If I were still trying to please people, I would not be a slave of Christ" (Galatians 1:10).

It's time for me to get real—to be honest with myself and before God. Do I want the truth? Can I handle the truth?

Our Last Great Hope

Why all this talk about reality and honesty? I raise these questions for one reason. Take a good look around you, at the direction of our world. All things considered, would you say it's a better or a worse place than a few years ago? Set the parameters of your evaluation any way you choose: our nation, the international scene, popular culture, our economy, our ecology, our politics, our families. Most of us would answer that we are a generation in decline. Many Christians believe that Christ may return soon. Even nonbelievers sense that calamity awaits us in some form.

If we, with all our technology, all our intelligence, and all our human philosophies, had the solution to this decline, don't you think we would have produced it by now, in these thousands of years of human civilization? Modernism hasn't created utopia. Science has created as many problems as it has solved. I must conclude that our last great hope lies beyond our human capabilities. The course of civilization has borne out what the Bible has said all along: we are fallen and deceived creatures; whatever we try—by our means—will be doomed to corruption because we are innately corrupted by our own sin.

There is one last great hope—for our world, our nation, our children, and our churches. That hope only becomes visible when we become honest, when we define reality rightly. That hope lies in the person and power of Jesus Christ and in no one else, in no other path or possibility. We call it good news, even though there is nothing new about it, because every new moment, every new problem, every new sin, has already been conquered and forgiven through His suffering and death on our behalf and His resurrection from the dead on that Easter morning two thousand years ago. There is good news for whatever is ailing in your life; good news for whatever challenges confront you tomorrow and next week; good news for every single conceivable human problem we face today. But it is good news that must be delivered and then accepted.

Years after the Second World War was over, there were Japanese soldiers still holed up on the Pacific Islands. No one had gotten them the news of surrender. They could have gone home to be with their families, but the good news had not been delivered. As a matter of fact, when the last aging soldier was finally brought the news, he refused to accept it. He convinced himself that it was only an enemy ploy to make him put down his weapons. Only when his commanding officer was personally brought to the island did the old soldier acknowledge that there was peace and that he no longer had to live in caves or fear the enemy.

Our God came Himself to deliver our good news, to tell us that the war between heaven and humanity was over and that both sides won. He put on flesh and walked among us and then, before He left, instructed us to keep on bringing that news. The war is over, but the fighting continues in places where the amazing news hasn't penetrated. Isn't that a tragedy? That's why our task is urgent—Satan is racking up victories in a conflict he has already lost. The head of the serpent has been cut off, and the body is writhing in its death pangs.

The gospel of Jesus Christ is the last great hope for this world. According to the promise of Jesus, we have been given His power, His presence, and His authority—all we need for success. And the Great Commission is our marching order, the operation on which everything depends. It's time for us to awaken to the urgency, the reality, the simplicity of this one task, an assignment beside which all others pale into insignificant trivia.

Think of the ways we allot our time and energy—our causes, our quests, our dreams, our hobbies, and our pursuits. How much eternal importance is in each one? Are we, like the legendary emperor Nero, fiddling while Rome burns? Jesus told us to seek His kingdom and His righteousness first, and all the other things will follow in their proper place (Matthew 6:33). First? I wonder how many of us are even seeking His kingdom second or third or tenth. How many people do we encounter every day who are dying of thirst for the living water only Christ can provide, but we're too busy to tell them?

Someday I will stand before my Father to account for my actions in this life. Oh, how I long to be able to say, "My Lord and my God, I know You gave me Your greatest gift, so I gave all that I could of my time and resources to do what would please You. In my generation, we fulfilled the Great Commission! We finally enabled every living soul on our planet to hear the message You longed to give them, and we made disciples of every nation."

And it is my deepest prayer that I can hear Him say, "Well done, good and faithful servant" (Matthew 25:21, 23 ESV).

A Great Awakening

During these last months, I've felt something change within me, something powerful stirring my soul. I've developed a deep hunger to be about my Father's business of pursuing this mission to our whole world, of carrying out the Great Commission. It's not as if I haven't always been devoted to the task. I've always seen it as the focal point of my personal ministry and all Christian ministry. That passion has been there for me. But lately, that passion has matured. It has taken hold of me from the inside, made me eager, and distracted me from little things that used to seem so important. It's as if all the chaos and clamor of my life have suddenly fallen into place and become one cohesive picture: the image of the Great Commission relentlessly pursued to fruition. I still care about leading my family, leading my church, serving my local community, and all the rest. But these are now like rivulets that lead into the great, raging river that is my charge to take the gospel to the world and see massive, global revival as a result.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Our Last Great Hope by RONNIE FLOYD Copyright © 2011 by Ronnie Floyd. Excerpted by permission of Thomas Nelson. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Contents

Overflowing with Gratitude....................xvii
Prologue: Encounter on a Mountaintop....................xxi
Chapter 1: Face the Truth About Yourself....................1
Chapter 2: Awaken the Church....................29
Chapter 3: Accept the Urgency....................54
Chapter 4: Transform Our Families....................75
Chapter 5: Capture Our Communities....................97
Chapter 6: Talk Jesus Daily....................120
Chapter 7: Desire It Deeply....................145
Chapter 8: Evaluate Everything Financially....................170
Chapter 9: Act Now....................195
Epilogue: Our Last Great Song....................218
Notes....................223
About the Author....................227
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Sort by: Showing all of 17 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 30, 2012

    Our Last Great Hope: Awakening the Great Commission by Ronnie Fl

    Our Last Great Hope: Awakening the Great Commission by Ronnie Floyd is a good book to help you get up and get evangelizing. The book is about living out the Great Commission: "Go and make disciples in Judea, Samaria and to the ends of the earth." Floyd moves through what Judea, Samaria, and the ends of the earth look like for Christians and it’s not just mission’s trips.

    The book moved along slowly at first because Floyd hit the same topics over and over. Eventually it picked up steam and really used the momentum to get me excited about taking a focused look at my life and how I can evangelize to those in it. I love that he draws the parallels to our neighborhoods (Judea), our country (Judea) and the rest of the world (the ends of the earth). He makes evangelism more about a lifestyle approach than about specific actions that need to be taken. I got a little bogged down in the first half of the book, but the second half is much better. Floyd brings up the money discussion and what exactly it looks like for Christians to tithe. It is a very enlightening and inspiring chapter that will get you motivated to give your money away. Overall this book has a very encouraging and upbeat feeling that won’t leave you feeling like a failure at evangelism.

    *** I received this book free as a part of my Booksneeze membership. The views written here, however, are completely my own.

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  • Posted December 14, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    A great message played out just okay

    Any subject that deals with outreach, evangelism, and the Great Commission is crucial in Christian discipleship. Ronnie Floyd's new book is a solid and respectable entry into the genre. In this book, he explains why it's so important to participate in practical evangelism and to even give of your life to promoting the cause through missionary efforts or church planting. The book tells some interesting stories of the wonders that can when one steps up to the plate to reach out to an unbeliever. The book is divided into sections: a plea for the church to awaken to its duty, the urgency of evangelism, how we are to make disciples and evangelize even our childrens, and how to evaluate effective outreach organizations within our church (particularly financial allocations for such causes).

    Overall, the book strikes on some good points and key topics. However, it is a bit lackluster overall. It is a good survey on the topic, but it doesn't really show you how to share the gospel with unbelievers and issues regarding certain difficulties around such practices. It lacks the zeal of David Platt's Radical, and the depth and shock value of Ray Comfort's Way of the Master.

    Overall, I give it a fair recommendation. There are, however, better evangelism books out there, such as the ones I mentioned above and the one recommended on the left.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 26, 2011

    Great Truth- Not so great book.

    It is so very hard for me to give this book a negative review because of the fact that I whole-heartily believe what Floyd wrote on these pages. He is spot on with his call to Christians and churches. The book he wrote is just simply difficult to read and tends to ramble a bit.

    I'm sure that Ronnie Floyd is a wonderful pastor; I'm just not so sure that writing is his calling. His book was not captivating or inspiring to me. After taking away what seems to me like puffed up bragging and repeated thoughts, I think the "high points" of this book could have been reduced into a more enjoyable pamphlet to read. Nonetheless, it is not a bad book to have on the bookshelf and it has certainly inspired many people.

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  • Posted November 22, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Good REad

    I love this book

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  • Posted September 27, 2011

    Good Read

    Our last Great Hope by Ronnie Floyd is a call back to the essence of what it means to be Christian. The book shows its readers that the church has forgotten the Great Commission. The author believes that just by following this simple directive the church will regain it's power and win the world for Christ Jesus. The idea written about is extremely exciting to him. One can almost hear him scream the words as one reads them. As the reader get deeper into the book he begins to realize that the author belives what he is saying very strongly. The author's passion for the Great Commission begins to take hold of the reader very soon after starting the book. Floyd talks, in the book, about several things that must happen before we can fully embrace the Great Commission. One is that we must face the truth about ourselves, another is we must reconsider the way spend our money. All the topics he covers are related to the goal of making the Great Commission reality.

    I realy enjoyed this book. The topic needed discussing and Ronnie Floyd did a great job of doing just that. The way he talks awaking the church, transforming our families, capturing our communities, and talking to Jesus daily is very inspiring. If you feel you life lacks direction spirituality you should read this book and apply it to you life. The only way to feel statified as a Christian is to win others for Christ.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 17, 2011

    This is a wonderful read !

    Our Last Great Hope by Ronnie Floyd
    This book is a very detailed insight into the real problem today .

    there are so many people today walking around thinking they have all the time in the world to get their life right with christ.tomorrow isnt promised to any of us,so it is important that we are truly ready for when that great day comes.the writer is really insightful in what he writes. the great commission is what it's all about and we have got to be ready.this is a great read for anyone but especially those that do not have a relationship with god yet. read it you won't be dissapointed.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2011

    IT really is our only hope

    Our last Great Hope by Ronnie Floyd is a call back to the essence of what it means to be Christian. The book shows its readers that the church has forgotten the Great Commission. Dr. Floyd belives that just by following this simple directive the chruch will regain its' power and win the world for Christ Jesus. The idea Floyd wrote about is extremely exciting to him. One can almost hear him scream the words as one reads them. As the reader get deeper into the book he begins to realize that the author belives what he is saying very strongly. The author's passion for the Great Commission begins to take hold of the reader very soon after starting the book. Dr. Floyd talks, in the book, about several things that must happen before we can fully embrace the Great Commission. One is that we must face the truth about ourselves, another is we must reconsider the way spend our money. All the topics he covers are related to the goal of making the Great Commission reality.

    I realy enjoyed this book. The topic needed discussing and Dr Floyed did a great job of doing just that. The way he talks awaking the church, transforming our families, capturing our communities, and talking to Jesus daily is very inspiring. If you feel you life lacks direction sprirtually you should read this book and apply it to you life. The only way to feel statified as a Christian is to win others for Christ. I received this book free from the booksneeze blogger review program. I was not required to write a good review. The opinions I expressed are my own.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 16, 2011

    Our Last Great Hoper

    For Evangelical Christianity, the Great Commission represents the very heartbeat of our Savior Jesus Christ. For in its' words and commands we find, with absolute clarity, the mission that we are to devote our lives to. In his new book, "Our Last Great Hope; Awakening the Great Commission", Dr. Ronnie Floyd examines the Great Commission in a way that I have not seen or heard before. As a Southern Baptist, I am familiar with Dr. Floyd and his ministry as the senior pastor of Cross Church, a multi-site church in Northwest Arkansas. When I read that he had written a book of the Great Commission, I was immediately interested. Dr. Floyd recently chaired the Great Commission Resurgence Task Force that took an intentional and exhaustive look at how we as Southern Baptists could do better at fulfilling the Great Commission. He shares in his book how his service on this task force gave him a renewed passion for and a heightened sense of urgency in joining Christ in the work of taking the gospel to the nations. Our Last Great Hope is not so much an academic work that dissects the Great Commission verses and explores all its' nuances. That being said, this work is well researched and sits on a firm biblical foundation. Instead, Our Last Great Hope demonstrates how to move the Great Commission from the classroom to the driving force in every believers heart, family, and life. Dr. Floyd walks the reader through the ways in which the Great Commission can become a personal reality. He begins with the individual. He builds his case that the Great Commission must first be personal before it can be public. He then goes on show how a commitment to the Great Commission will affect their families, businesses, local communities, and then the nations. He also says that a commitment to the Great Commission will affect our prayer lives, plans, and our giving. Dr. Floyd has written a very challenging work. As a pastor, I am familiar with the Great Commission, however, I have been challenged to think about it differently. If it were possible, Our Last Great Hope should be required reading for all staff members and lay leaders. This is a book that I will read again. His balance of scripture and personal experience makes this book a joy to read. I highly recommended this book. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their Blogger Review Program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

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  • Posted September 16, 2011

    Worth Your Time

    This book addresses the need to spread the gospel, which is "our last great hope", NOW, making a compelling case that time is short. It looks at the topic broadly and narrowly, generally and specifically. The author devotes chapters to churches, families and individuals each taking the Great Commission seriously. One of the chapters on individuals is called "Talk Jesus Daily", with nine actions given we can take: prioritize, pray for opportunities, pray by name, prepare yourself personally and practically, prime your relationships, present the gospel, provide the moment for receiving Christ, position for the future, and place your trust in the Lord.

    This book was challenging and inspiring. As "The Hole in Our Gospel" addressed the need for all to be serious about clean water for the world, "Our Last Great Hope" addresses the need for all to be serious about the Great Commission. It is thought provoking, conveys biblical truth well, and deserves a wide audience.

    I received this book for free in exchange for my unbiased review through the Thomas Nelson BookSneeze Program.

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  • Posted September 9, 2011

    False teacher doesn't live what he preaches - gives only 2% to missions

    Ronnie Floyd's Our Last Great Hope Awakening the Great Commission is a book about missionary work and converting nonbelievers into Christians. This book called the task "the Great Commission" and describes it as "our last great hope" because the author believes the two most important things in life are 1) being saved and 2) saving others.

    I give this book 1 stars because I think the author is a false teacher, selling his books for money and not living the life he is pressuring everyone else to live - read my complete review and you will see why I say this. Although this book was interesting, it came across sales pitchy and pushy - I don't like the author's message. I also don't agree with the author's emphasis on making missions the number one important thing in your life outside of your own salvation. I do acknowledge the book was well-written and thought-provoking.

    In disagreeing with the emphasis on missions, I feel like the emphasis on missions is too strong and I'm not certain the Great Commission was meant to be outside of the disciples of Jesus' time. If it was meant to be outside the disciples time, then why do many bible verses suggest the mission was completed? Also, why did NO CHRISTIAN do any missionary work from the disciples time prior to 70AD all the way up to 1783AD? That's 1700 years of human lives without any missionaries? I think if God wanted missions to be so important, people would have been doing missions before 1783. Also, many conservative presbyterians believe the miracles, healings, tongues etc were only for the time of Jesus and the disciples. Google this and you will find a lot of supporting documentation this subject. It seems pentacostals are among the few who believe the miracles still apply to us today.

    Along with emphasis on missions, Floyd is especially pushy about multiplying churches - bragging about what he's done. He writes as if creating 10,000 new churches in America equals saved people and God's will. Sorry but I feel like the current STATE of our churches is much more important than making more. Let's fix the ones that are not producing fruit in line with living like Jesus. We don't need more churches, we need better churches!

    This book did make me think about my current views, so I think it is a good book for that. But this book really makes you feel like a crappy Christian or a bad person or even almost an unsaved person if you don't make missions number one in your life. I didn't like that feeling. It's like the author guilts you into missions.

    I also looked up the author Ronnie Floyd after finishing the book and found he is pastor of CrossChurch, a megachurch (now 3 churches with over 16,000 attendees) and I don't agree with his views. Also there are some negative articles (I don't know how true they are) on him on google about pressuring Christians on tithing while his very own church only gives 2.2% to missions. If missions really is number 1 as he says in this book, why doesn't his own church live this? Why isn't the author living what he is preaching? Probably because he just wants the money from selling his books.

    Go to website: FBC Jax Watchdog on Blogspot dot com
    Articles called "Ronnie and Johnny: Doggone It, How Can We Spread the Gospel If the Sheep Don't Tithe?" and "Floyd and GCR: They Are Astounded at the Selfishness of God's People"

    My disclaimer - I received this book from the publisher Thomas Nelson fre

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  • Posted September 7, 2011

    Thought-provoking, Will Persuade You Towards Missions

    This book is about making missionary work the most important goal of your life - become another Apostle Paul. The author focuses greatly on planting churches in enormous numbers all around the world and preaching in all parts of the world. The author's goal is to convince you of the importance of missionary work, calling it the "last great hope".

    As a Christian woman, I found this book very interesting. It challenged my current lifestyle and even if it doesn't change my goal in life into becoming a missionary, it certainly has challenged my perspective on missions and made me re-evaluate the importance of missionary work. It also makes me question whether the Bible REALLY does tell us to become missionaries or if that did end with the apostles. Not only did the author hold my attention, but I found this book very thought-provoking. I would recommend this book to others - it is worth considering, even if you don't agree 100%.

    If you read this book, expect to be convinced, pressured, guilted or scared into becoming a missionary. To say the author takes missions VERY seriously is even an understatement - he goes to the extreme of nearly (without outright saying it) questioning one's salvation if they aren't a missionary and he uses scriptures to back up his side of the story. Floyd is quite convincing. One way or the other, you will certainly come away with that feeling of "Oh boy, I better get off my butt and become a missionary" much like some say "I better read my bible more".

    xxvii, pg3: Floyd describes The Great Commission as "Tell every person in the world about Jesus Christ and make disciples of all nations." He wrote "we have no choice - this, the fulfillment of the Great Commission, is our last great hope." We are ALL to become missionaries and there is nothing more important in life than to save people from a horrible end in hell.

    pg5: And just in case you are wavering, he quotes James "if anyone is a hearer of the word and not a doer, he is like a man looking at his own face in a mirror; for he looks at himself, goes away, and right away forgets what kind of man he was. (James 1:22-24)" Floyd almost presents it like "if you don't become a missionary" you are disobeying God and you may not be saved after all. If you REALLY loved God, you would become a missionary.

    pg 9: "How many people do we encounter every day who are dying of thirst for the living water only Christ can provide, but we're too busy to tell them? How many people do we encounter every day who are dying of thirst for the living water only Christ can provide, but we're too busy to tell them?"

    pg10-11: "If only I could spend all my time, all my abilities, all my strength on what really matters. I look around and see our streets teeming with people who are consumed by football or politics or Hollywood or Wall Street or the dating scene or the Internet. I understand the lure of all these things. But as for me, I want to trade in my remaining years, months, days, and minutes-God alone knows their count-for the kind of seeds that will take root among people and then blossom in heaven. I now see my moments as currency, and I can spend them on trash or treasure. I don't want to give any precious resource of this life to that which isn't eternally significant."

    Disclaimer: I received this book free of charge from the publisher but I am giving my honest review.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2011

    Our last hope

    Our Last Great Hope is a very interesting book. It is very inspiring and just a great read. It's a great book; a must read. Our Last Great Hope is definitely a book that will last a long while. It is interesting, amazing, and just everything you want to read about. It's a great book for christian people and just everyone!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 25, 2011

    Start spreading His name...

    I just completed reading this book. The basic premise of the book is this: pay more attention to the Great Commission. Whether it be through an awakening of your own personal purpose, the purpose of the church, parenting etc.... Floyd mixed in a good bit of personal stories to illustrate each of the points made throughout the book. Floyd then goes on to challenge the reader to accept the urgency of the Great Commission. He gives a few ways how we all can be apart of helping fulfill the Great Commission whether it be through our own communities, our daily lives or even our own financial decisions. In each chapter he attempts to add some nice catchy and cute sayings and lists to help the reader remember and put into practice telling others about Jesus. He did a fairly good job of going between "church planting", "local missions" and "global missions." He presented some decent stats given to him by his friends at NAMB and the IMB. He wraps up his book by challenging us to examine or to think about the return of Jesus whenever we gather, pray, the Spirit comes and when we speak boldly (drawing from the apostles in the book of Acts). And finally he envisions a huge "flash mob", and we all are in it... hmmm...
    I found the book quite simple. I couldn't help but think Ronnie was kind of jumping on the fade that a little orange book has sparked in Evangelical Christianity in the past year. It seemed at times Ronnie was "tooting his horn" a bit while mentioning one of his other books, and using his church as and example for many of his points. I found it the book quite simple, not much challenging things.... there wasn't much deep theology. I would recommend anybody thinking about reading his book to just skip it and read the little orange book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2011

    4.5 Stars - Our Last Great Hope

    The word *hope* has been thrown around a lot over the past few years, and it seems to me that it may have lost some of its meaning. When the *hope* that people think they are getting turns to dismay, disappointment, and disillusionment, it may be a wake-up call that the focus is not on the Messiah.

    Ronnie Floyd, a pastor, has recently written Our Last Great Hope: Awakening the Great Commission. While the "last great" part of it may seem rather fatalistic, in a greater sense, it is. He wants the reader to appreciate that there are millions (or perhaps billions) of people dwelling on earth who have not heard the good news and are not saved.

    His argument is that rather than tithe, pray for a handful of missionaries, and move on with your life, you should be active--evaluating yourself and your commitment, engaging and enthusing your church, "talking" Jesus daily, and reaching the next generation now.

    As someone who routinely tutors "the next generation" and has conversations with them about their priorities, their goals, and their lives, I can attest that this is one of the greater challenges. As the author expresses, however, it is Our Last Great Hope.

    I think this book would be especially useful when read as a group -- women's or men's groups at church, church leadership, college-age group, or any other similar group.

    Please note that I received this book at no charge from BookSneeze in exchange for an honest review.

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    Posted November 9, 2011

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    Posted October 4, 2011

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    Posted October 27, 2011

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