Our Love to Admire

Our Love to Admire

3.9 10
by Interpol
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Though Our Love to Admire is technically Interpol's first major-label album, the way the band attempted to streamline the gorgeously dark atmospherics of Turn on the Bright Lights into something more marketable on Antics made that album feel more like their big-time debut than this album does. On Our Love to Admire

Overview

Though Our Love to Admire is technically Interpol's first major-label album, the way the band attempted to streamline the gorgeously dark atmospherics of Turn on the Bright Lights into something more marketable on Antics made that album feel more like their big-time debut than this album does. On Our Love to Admire, Interpol spends roughly half their time following Antics' game plan of distilling their sound into readily accessible hooks, and the other half stretching their sound with deluxe arrangements and filigrees like strings, brass, and keyboards (all of which are used to grandiose effect on "Wrecking Ball"). Our Love to Admire's poppy tracks have been polished into black patent leather brilliance: "No I in Threesome"'s jaunty, insistent rhythms and "The Heinrich Maneuver"'s relatively bright, bouncy attack show that Interpol has gotten better, or at least more accomplished, at transforming their sound into singles since Antics. More heartening news for Turn on the Bright Lights fans arrives on Our Love to Admire's ambitious tracks, some of which come close to touching the greatness of Interpol's debut. "Pioneer to the Falls" uses the album's expansive production to the hilt, beginning with elegantly treacherous guitars, strings, and pianos; Daniel Kessler's soaring guitar solo and Paul Banks' repeated entreaties of "you fly straight into my heart" feel like the musical equivalent of storm clouds clearing. The song is filmic and full of ideas, and updates the spirit behind Turn on the Bright Lights without rehashing its sound slavishly. "Mammoth" is another standout, a tense yet hypnotic rocker that builds into a graceful fury around the refrain "spare me the suspense" and the band's relentless rhythm section. However, two of the prettiest songs vie for the title of the album's strongest track: "Rest My Chemistry" is Our Love to Admire's languid, luminous centerpiece (and the song that most clearly recalls Turn on the Bright Lights' magic), while the album's spare, vulnerable finale, "The Lighthouse," boasts some of Banks' most natural, affecting vocals yet. When Our Love to Admire falters -- and it falters a fair amount of the time -- it's because Interpol's attention to atmosphere and detail outpaces the songwriting. At this point the band is so professional that songs like "The Scale," "Who Do You Think?," and "Pace Is the Trick" can sound good in the moment, but fail to leave a lasting impression. With nearly as many awkward moments as inspired ones, Our Love to Admire is a somewhat schizophrenic listening experience. It feels like half of an album by a band making sure their songs that fit the mold of what they've done before, and half of an album by a band using their major-label leverage to push their boundaries. Who knows which version of the band will prevail, but there are just enough interesting songs on Our Love to Admire to suggest that they can't be written off entirely just yet.

Product Details

Release Date:
07/10/2007
Label:
Capitol
UPC:
0094637653821
catalogNumber:
76538
Rank:
28122

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Our Love to Admire 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Good blend of the better parts of Turn on the Bright Lights and Antics. Paul Banks sounds more sure of himself vocally and the entire band appears more confident. Pioneer to the Falls, in particular, is one of the most beautiful songs ever recorded by Interpol. While nothing so far matches the beauty of the TOTBL, this makes a good third album.
TheDoctor More than 1 year ago
I bought this after discovering 'The Heinrich Maneuver' on the radio. That's the best song on this album. All the other singles are good. 'No I in Threesome' is very peppy, and 'Rest My Chemistry' is upbeat, but soothing. The album has a general theme of independence to it, and this is highlited by 'The Heinrich Maneuver.' I'd buy this album if you like punk and alternative in general. Overall, the theme of the album is very powerful.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Classic album that you can really sit back and enjoy.
Dalav More than 1 year ago
I really like these New Yorkers. The first album, Turn On The Bright Lights, is generally considered to be the best by their fans, although there is plenty to like in Our Love To Admire. The music has opened up a bit, the keyboards seem to be integrated better than in the past, although Paul's voice is still lacks emotion consistently from song to song (which isn¿t to say I don¿t like it, but I recognize it may be a sore point for some). I find myself coming back to Interpol more so than other groups. The songs have legs, in the tradition of the best music improving with each listen. The lyrics can be a bit murky, which make the songs less accessible at first. Some highlights of note:
"No I In Threesome": great title. Rousing track. The lyrics are sung straight-faced, but who can¿t be amused when listening to "you feel the sweet breath of time, it's whispering it's truth, not mine, there's no "i" in threesome." "Pioneer To The Falls": hang in there with this one. It chugs along without distinction, and you wonder where they¿re going, until it hits the middle section at the 2:30 mark when it becomes a real beauty. There's the emotion coming through. "The Heinrich Maneuver": satisfies our up-tempo needs. In interviews Paul doesn't give many clues about the meaning of this song, but it seems to be about the aftermath of a break-up in which the jilted party has recovered from the body blow sufficiently to send some venom to the other party. "Rest My Chemistry": This is apparently about taking some time off from a cocaine habit to let the body¿s chemistry return to normal. The music has an epic quality to it. "Wrecking Ball": I like the closing section, where nebulous lyrics nevertheless carry with them an interesting quality of sadness. A similar sense runs through the lyrics in the main part of the song, delivered slowly, deliberately, with finality: "I'm inside, Like a wrecking ball through your eyes, and I change it all from inside." The album ends with the unusual "The Lighthouse", where Paul's voice, accompanied by guitar, is intimate yet achingly distant. A beautiful track.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago