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Our Natural History: The Lessons of Lewis and Clark
     

Our Natural History: The Lessons of Lewis and Clark

by Daniel B. Botkin
 
Often referred to as America's national epic of exploration, the 28-month Lewis and Clark expedition was certainly America's greatest odyssey. Beginning in St. Louis, William Clark and Meriwether Lewis navigated up the Missouri River and through the prairies, reaching the summit of the Rocky Mountains and then following the Columbia River to their final destination,

Overview

Often referred to as America's national epic of exploration, the 28-month Lewis and Clark expedition was certainly America's greatest odyssey. Beginning in St. Louis, William Clark and Meriwether Lewis navigated up the Missouri River and through the prairies, reaching the summit of the Rocky Mountains and then following the Columbia River to their final destination, the Pacific Ocean. Trained in natural history and in the methods of collecting plant and animal samples, they carefully and meticulously recorded the conditions of the rivers, prairies, forests, mountains, and wildlife of pre-industrial America.

In this new edition of Our Natural History, Daniel Botkin, a distinguished botanist and naturalist, recreates the grand journey -- taking us on an exciting ecological adventure back to the landscape of the great American West. In retracing their steps, Botkin reveals what this western landscape actually looked like and how much it's been changed by modern civilization and technology. He shows us that from the explorers' observations, we can learn much about the environment of our past, our environment today, and what our environment might be in the future. Now with a new afterword marking the 200th anniversary of the expedition, this timely and thought-provoking book captures our imagination and stimulates our sentiment with lessons about our environment and our place within it. Our Natural History offers a stunning and rare portrait of the rugged, beautiful, disappearing wilderness of the American West.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This intriguing volume begins with Lewis and Clark's search for a pass in the Rocky Mountain wilderness; it ends with the author's search for original prairie in Omaha, Nebraska. Botkin (Discordant Harmony: A New Ecology for the Twenty-first Century) describes the American West as seen by Lewis and Clark in 1804-06 and compares it with today's West as shaped by industrial civilization. It is a unique picture of frontier wilderness, interwoven with Botkin's own perspective on nature. He maintains that our present approach to environmental issues is based on faulty beliefs, mythologies and religious convictions. The records of Lewis and Clark are valuable for helping us understand what nature was like before we changed it. Botkin notes that we rarely approach conservation with the methodical intensity found in the explorers' journals. He has given us a fresh and welcome perspective on that historic expedition. BOMC selection. (May)
KLIATT
From St. Louis to the Pacific and back again, William Clark, Meriwether Lewis and their band of intrepid explorers opened up the West to their fellow Americans in 1804. Along the way they recorded the natural features of the land and collected animals and plants. This new edition of a book first published in 1995 includes an afterword by the author. Daniel Botkin, botanist and ecologist, emphasizes the differences between the land then and now, noting the changes wrought by the coming of civilization and wondering about its effects on a future America. Topics include various Indian tribes, meandering rivers, grizzlies, buffalo, wolves, forests and prairies. Written in vivid detail, this story of Lewis and Clark will appeal to environmentalists as well as to a broader general audience. KLIATT Codes: JSA—Recommended for junior and senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 1995, Oxford Univ. Press, 304p. notes. index., Ages 12 to adult.
—Janet Julian
Library Journal
Botkin, president of the Center for the Study of the Environment and director of the Program on Global Change at George Mason University, examines the journals of Lewis and Clark to understand change in nature. His question is "What was nature like before modern, technological civilization?" For people to have a better, more secure future, Botkin asserts that they must understand their relationship with the environment. They must know not only their own history but the history of nature as well. Addressing timeless topics, Botkin blends the historic past with the newsworthy present to offer solutions for the future. Recommended for all libraries.-Patricia Owens, Wabash Valley Coll., Mt. Carmel, Ill.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399522420
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
11/01/1996
Pages:
277
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 7.98(h) x 0.83(d)

Meet the Author

Daniel Botkin is President of the Center for the Study of the Environment in Santa Barbara, California, and Research Professor in the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the author of more than one hundred books and articles, including Discordant Harmonies (OUP 2000).

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