Our San Antonio

Overview


Quintessentially historic Texas, San Antonio is the place where Old Mexico and the deep South, the Wild West and Native American culture meet and mingle. A stunning photographic portrait of the city, this book conducts visitors and natives alike to San Antonio's best known and most beloved landmarks as well as her lesser-known but no less fascinating historic sites, natural splendors, and cultural marvels.

First stop, of course, is the Alamo, where more than 180 Americans and ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers and in stores.

Pick Up In Store Near You

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (9) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $4.79   
  • Used (6) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$4.79
Seller since 2013

Feedback rating:

(25)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
NEW! -Ships Direct, All items in stock. Fast Shipping, Excellent customer service.

Ships from: Tarentum, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$11.95
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(328)

Condition: New
0760329737 BRAND NEW. GIFT QUALITY!

Ships from: WELLINGTON, FL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$50.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(136)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview


Quintessentially historic Texas, San Antonio is the place where Old Mexico and the deep South, the Wild West and Native American culture meet and mingle. A stunning photographic portrait of the city, this book conducts visitors and natives alike to San Antonio's best known and most beloved landmarks as well as her lesser-known but no less fascinating historic sites, natural splendors, and cultural marvels.

First stop, of course, is the Alamo, where more than 180 Americans and Texans, including Davy Crockett, lost their lives in a fierce thirteen-day battle with the Mexican army in 1936.

A tour of historic San Antonio also includes La Villita, one of the original settlements housing Spanish soldiers; the Spanish Governors Palace; Fort Sam Houston; San Fernando Cathedral; and four mission churches. San Antonio is also home to the famous Paseo del Rio, or River Walk.

The authors, longtime residents, take us along this thoroughfare through the heart of the city, along the San Antonio River's banks, past the teeming shops and restaurants, clubs, theaters, and posh hotels. They direct us then to the city's other highlights, such as the Tower of the Americas, Brackenridge Park and the San Antonio Zoo, the Marion Koogler McNay Museum and the San Antonio Museum of Art as well as five major military installations.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780760329733
  • Publisher: Voyageur Press
  • Publication date: 2/15/2008
  • Series: Our ... Series
  • Edition description: First
  • Pages: 112
  • Product dimensions: 9.20 (w) x 12.10 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Mark Langford, a 1980 graduate of Brokos Photography Institute in Santa Barbara, California, has owned a photo illustration studio since 1984. His photographs have appeared nationally in advertisements, publications, brochures, and annual reports. Langford is a lifelong resident of San Antonio.Susanna Nawrocki has been the general manager of the Twig Book Shop in San Antonio since 1976. A native of Akron, Ohio, Nawrocki has a graduate degree in library science from Indiana University and now calls San Antonio home. Gerald Lair, who has worked in advertising since 1970, is a freelance writer specializing in brochures, annual reports, and ad campaigns. Originally from Pearsall, sixty miles south of San Antonio, he now resides in the Alamo City. Mark Langford, a 1980 graduate of Brokos Photography Institute in Santa Barbara, California, has owned a photo illustration studio since 1984. His photographs have appeared nationally in advertisements, publications, brochures, and annual reports. Langford is a lifelong resident of San Antonio. Susanna Nawrocki has been the general manager of the Twig Book Shop in San Antonio since 1976. A native of Akron, Ohio, Nawrocki has a graduate degree in library science from Indiana University and now calls San Antonio home. Gerald Lair, who has worked in advertising since 1970, is a freelance writer specializing in brochures, annual reports, and ad campaigns. Originally from Pearsall, sixty miles south of San Antonio, he now resides in the Alamo City. Mark Langford, a 1980 graduate of Brokos Photography Institute in Santa Barbara, California, has owned a photo illustration studio since 1984. His photographs have appeared nationally in advertisements, publications, brochures, and annual reports. Langford is a lifelong resident of San Antonio. Susanna Nawrocki has been the general manager of the Twig Book Shop in San Antonio since 1976. A native of Akron, Ohio, Nawrocki has a graduate degree in library science from Indiana University and now calls San Antonio home. Gerald Lair, who has worked in advertising since 1970, is a freelance writer specializing in brochures, annual reports, and ad campaigns. Originally from Pearsall, sixty miles south of San Antonio, he now resides in the Alamo City. Mark Langford, a 1980 graduate of Brokos Photography Institute in Santa Barbara, California, has owned a photo illustration studio since 1984. His photographs have appeared nationally in advertisements, publications, brochures, and annual reports. Langford is a lifelong resident of San Antonio.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Contents

Foreword

Introduction

Missions

The Alamo

The River Walk

Neighborhoods & Architecture

Military

Parks & Museums

Entertainment & Festivals

Reflections

Read More Show Less

Introduction

Introduction

Welcome to San Antonio, the Alamo City. Each year, San Antonio embraces, entertains, captivates, and charms not only its own citizens, but also millions of visitors. People come from all over the world because there's much to see, much to do, and much to remember. Experiencing the full measure of what the city has to offer requires a working knowledge of its history and a healthy dose of organization and planning. This book offers a visual and verbal tour of the sights, sounds, events, people, and places that make the Alamo City so special. It's the big picture and more. When writing about San Antonio, the most difficult challenge is figuring out where to begin. So let's start at the top.

From the observation deck atop the 750 the Americas, you truly see San Antonio. On a clear day, the entire city is in view, as is a varied and picturesque countryside-a patchwork of mostly flat farm and ranchlands to the south and east, gently rolling hills due north, and the fabled Texas Hill Country to the west. Straight down is HemisFair Park, ninety-two acres of redeveloped land that was once the home of HemisFair '68, San Antonio's World's Fair.

This vantage point gives you the opportunity not only to see, but also to feel the magnificence of a proud place deemed as "one of America's four unique cities," where skyscrapers engulf bricked streets, a shopping mall surrounds a church, the San Antonio River meanders through the central city with its legendary cobblestone River Walk, the Alamo rests in quiet solitude, and Market Square brims with activity as people shop and dine and trolleys ding as they go. San Antonio is a romantic setting, complete with theindelible charm of La Villita (the little village along the river), the elegance of the ageless Menger Hotel, the tranquility of a horse-drawn carriage ride, and a rich past evidenced by the missions of San José, San Juan Capistrano, Concepción, and San Francisco de la Espada. A confluence of cultures makes San Antonio great.

From your cloudlike perch, you'll see the German-influenced King William Historic District, the French architecture of the old Ursuline Academy that is now the Southwest School of Art and Craft, the Spanish character of the Spanish Governor's Palace, and the eight-sided neo-Gothic design of the Tower Life Building-a thirty-one-story edifice that was the South's tallest structure when built in the late 1920s. You'll even gaze at river revelers floating on barges, the hustle and bustle of conventioneers around the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, and an internationally famous zoo. From high above the cityscape, pick out Sea World of Texas, Six Flags Fiesta Texas, three important military installations, the Alamodome, and the AT&T Center, home of the San Antonio Spurs. You'll also get a bird's-eye view of lush greenbelts and over seventy-five city parks that feature a myriad of tree species, including oak, mesquite, cypress, willow, elm, hackberry, mulberry, huisache, persimmon, and pecan. San Antonio's warm, sunbelt climate supports a preponderance of plant life, creating a vivid kaleidoscope of color in the overall beauty of the city below.

Once back on the ground, it's time to immerse yourself in the traditions and passions of the Alamo City. Although the celebration we call Fiesta San Antonio is officially in April of each year, San Antonio is really a fiesta every day. The food alone is enough to get you fired up. A visit is not complete without Mexican food, margaritas, and mariachis. Bite into a jalapeno, buy a sombrero, barge in on a river taxi, and be happy. This is San Antonio-alluring and unique. The experience is exceptional. San Antonio casts a spell.

At one time, the San Antonio Convention and Visitor's Bureau used the promotional theme, "Nowhere else but San Antonio." The Spanish translation for this is "Solamente en San Antonio." The phrase truly captured the Alamo City's one-of-a-kind nature. Although no longer the official slogan for the city, it still speaks volumes today. Sample a snow cone on the street; find a festival any time of the year; applaud an armadillo race; chase down prize-winning chili with an ice-cold cerveza; or maybe even saunter on over to the Majestic for a symphony, a Broadway play, or an outstanding performance by a nationally known celebrity. San Antonio has something for everyone, at the drop of a hat. But most of all, San Antonio has character. We cherish our past, live our present to the fullest, and anticipate a bright and successful future.

The San Antonio metropolitan area encompasses a population of almost one and a half million people. About half of the residents are of Hispanic descent, about seven percent are African-American, a small percentage are Asian and other ethnicities, with the remainder being melting-pot Anglo. We all live together, work together, and enjoy San Antonio together. The city offers a diverse workplace, from manufacturing to military, retail to livestock, tourism to petroleum production, banking to medicine, and just about everything in between.

The first European visitors came to what is now San Antonio over three hundred years ago. The rest is history. In the pages that follow, you are invited to enjoy an overview of the important people, places, and things that shaped our city.
Read More Show Less

Foreword

Foreword

First-time visitors to San Antonio are nearly always surprised by what they see. Many have a vision, derived from motion pictures, of a city set in desert country, bare and sun-browned-but once they arrive, they are delighted by the lushness and greenery. Many have a movie-inspired image of the Alamo as a solitary stone fort set somewhere on an open prairie. A recent visitor from San Francisco couldn't believe his eyes when he stepped out of the Hyatt Regency hotel at nighttime and saw that famous citadel of liberty in the heart of downtown, its white walls luminous and magical under a focus of floodlights. Most visitors have heard of San Antonio as one of America's four unique cities, yet they are nearly always surprised at how unique it really is, in almost every way.

When asked to write the foreword for this book about San Antonio, I was surprised, too. Guidebooks are useful for finding your way around cities, but they usually give only a sketchy view of a city's history and even less about the life and character of its citizens. What attracted me about Our San Antonio is that it not only tells tourists what to see and experience in this unusual city, it also tells San Antonians things about their city and themselves that will both surprise and enlighten them.

As a native of San Antonio who has lived in several other cities, I have heard San Antonio's alluring call. This city, known as the soul or mother of Texas, has a way of capturing visitors and enticing them to stay.

When the Spaniards came to Texas in the late seventeenth century, it was the San Antonio River (then called Yanaguana by the Indians living in the area) and the springs atits source (still flowing behind the University of the Incarnate Word) that made them settle here. At the center of this first settlement was a presidio, or military installation (now Military Plaza with our city hall in the center), and five Roman Catholic missions built at intervals along the river to convert and civilize the nomadic Indians of South Texas. What is a surprise, even to many San Antonians, is that the Alamo originally was not a fort but was one of these missions.

Visitors confused by the city's winding streets often ask whether they were laid out on cow trails or by drunken citizens trying to find their way home. The answer is more logical. The first settlers were given narrow strips of land stretching back from the river from which they drew water to drink and to irrigate their crops. The early roads connecting the narrow strips of land necessarily followed the meandering course of the river, and eventually became the city's streets. That river now winds through San Antonio's downtown and is one of the city's most charming features. Locals as well as tourists love the cobblestone walks along the riverbanks, the shops and restaurants, and the Parisian atmosphere.

My great-grandparents and grandparents came to San Antonio from Poland in the post-Civil War period to escape Europe's recurring wars and to find opportunities denied them in the old country. Other immigrants-from Germany, Czechoslovakia, Ireland, and Italy-came here for similar reasons. These early immigrants naturally settled in little enclaves where they could still speak their own languages and continue the customs they brought with them from their native lands. In the various ethnic enclaves of San Antonio, people tended to keep to themselves, sometimes resenting members of other ethnic groups.

In 1968, San Antonio hosted the World's Fair. HemisFair, with its slogan "The Confluence of Cultures," placed emphasis on the positive contributions of the more than thirty-two ethnic groups in San Antonio and did much to overcome negative feelings between groups. Even more so, the creation of the Institute of Texan Cultures during HemisFair provided a common meeting ground for the city's ethnic groups, engendering a mutual respect that has been enhanced by the institute's annual Texas Folklife Festival.

San Antonio represents a confluence of cultures in another important way-it is the nexus of three very different geophysical regions. If you fly from Dallas to San Antonio, you can distinctly see the Balcones Fault, which divides East Texas, with its more abundant rainfall, farms, and forests, from West Texas, with its scant rainfall, scrubby brush, and vast ranches. South of San Antonio is a third geographic area, the Brush Country, which fades off into the coastal plains, and the Gulf of Mexico is to the east of the city and the country of Mexico to the southwest.

These three geographical areas determine and define three distinct cultures meeting in San Antonio. The city is as far north as the Hispanic-Mexican culture advanced before it was halted by the Comanche Indians in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; as far west as the southern culture came with its cotton plantations, southern cuisine, and folkways; and as far east as the open-range cattle kingdom came, with its cowboy, ranch, and horse culture.

Even though Texas won its independence from Mexico in 1836, San Antonio has never given up its early Mexican culture. Today the city's population is more than 50 percent Hispanic. You can hear Spanish spoken on radio, TV, and almost any street corner, and you can see it on signs and advertisements. The Mexican national holidays of Cinco de Mayo and Diez y Seis are celebrated, Mexican food is the dominant cuisine, and almost every celebration includes Mexican mariachis or conjunto music. Mexican architecture is seen everywhere, particularly in red-tile roofs and saltillo tile floors.

When the Comanches halted the Hispanic-Mexican movement north, the government in Mexico City invited American settlers into the Texas province to bolster its defenses. Many came from the southern states through Louisiana, and their culture is seen in San Antonio's Greek Revival architecture, the local taste for smoked ham and hush puppies, organizations like the Texas Cavaliers, the queen and duchesses of the annual Fiesta celebrations, and remnant rebel drawls and attitudes.

Ranch and cowboy culture came to Texas from Mexico and then spread to the rest of the United States from San Antonio and the Brush Country. When I was a kid, my family had a ranch near Pleasanton (about thirty-five miles south of San Antonio) that we believe was part of Mission San José's Rancho del Atascosa, one of the very first ranches in Texas and in the United States. In the center of Pleasanton is a statue of a cowboy claiming this is where the American ranching industry was born. The Spaniards brought their longhorn cattle and their vaqueros (the forerunners of American cowboys) to this region from Mexico; later, after the Civil War, Texas cowboys not only drove Texas longhorns to railroads in Kansas to supply the eastern states with beef, but drove them to nearly all of the western states to provide seed stock for the great American ranching industry.

On our ranch was an old bowlegged cowboy, Alex Morose, who had driven cattle up the trail when he was only fourteen or fifteen years old. He slept on the wooden floor of his room because he had slept outside so long that he never got used to sleeping in a bed. San Antonio was the headquarters city for many of those old trail drivers, and their annual conventions were held in the Gunter Hotel. Today, there is a museum next to the Witte Museum in Brackenridge Park that is devoted to trail drivers. It tells their history and exhibits their clothing and equipment, six-shooters, and rifles-but the legendary ten-gallon hat, leather or canvas jacket, and leather chaps and gauntlets of the cowboy were not designed for show; they were worn for protection against the dense, thorny chaparral of the Brush Country.

The old-time cowboys may be gone now, but their culture is still strong in San Antonio. I hardly know anybody here, with or without money, who doesn't have a secret yearning to own a ranch. Young and old love to wear cowboy hats, boots, and big belt buckles. Ranching clothes come out of the closet during the annual San Antonio Stock Show & Rodeo each February. And what would a typical Texas meal be without barbecue and beans?

The juncture of the three geographical zones makes San Antonio a unique city in still another way. Its flora and fauna represent all three regions; here you find Southern pines, magnolias, and azaleas; dry-country yuccas, cacti, and palms; and tropical red-flowered hibiscus. The area is a paradise for bird lovers, with Texas boasting the largest variety of species of any state in the country-more than six hundred-a large percentage of which can be seen in San Antonio at one time or another. Countless species of butterflies live here most of the year, while others pass through in migration north or south. One day, on the Guadalupe River north of San Antonio, my wife and I saw a big cypress tree aflutter with as many migrating monarch butterflies as leaves.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)