Out of Sight: Pictures of Hidden Worlds

Out of Sight: Pictures of Hidden Worlds

by Simon Author
     
 

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From deep within the human body to distant nebulae in outer space, there are worlds all around us that are smaller, faster, and farther than the unaided eye can see. In these thirty-six amazing images, you can see the invisible: from a white blood cell attacking E. coli bacteria, to the delicate splash from a falling drop of water captured by a high-speed strobe.

Overview

From deep within the human body to distant nebulae in outer space, there are worlds all around us that are smaller, faster, and farther than the unaided eye can see. In these thirty-six amazing images, you can see the invisible: from a white blood cell attacking E. coli bacteria, to the delicate splash from a falling drop of water captured by a high-speed strobe. With pictures that astound and fascinating explanations of how each image was captured, award-winning author Seymour Simon takes readers on a fantastic voyage that's truly out of sight.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Photos of objects beyond the detection of the human eye--either because they are infinitesimal, too large, too far away or hidden inside the human body--are reproduced with remarkable clarity in Simon's (Destination: Jupiter) insightful volume. The author keeps his text to a minimum, explaining succinctly each image featured and the methods and instruments used to capture them, including compound microscopes, fiber optics, CAT scans, MRIs, thermograms and high-speed photography. Only occasionally does the narrative become overly technical for the targeted audience, as in a description of the magnification of subatomic particles in motion. Even the creepy pictures (a head louse magnified 320 times; and plaque and tartar on the surface of a tooth, magnified some 2,700 times) will attract readers. From a three-dimensional picture of a virus, as seen through an electron microscope, to a dramatic photograph of the vast Eagle Nebula, a star-forming region of the Milky Way galaxy, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, these images are awesome in every sense of the word. Ages 5-up. (Aug.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
Gr 4-8-Simon has collected an impressive assortment of photographs presenting images that cannot be seen with the naked eye. They include pictures taken through a telescope, through a microscope, magnetic resonance images, CAT scans, scanning electron micrographs (SEMs), time-stopping shots taken with strobes, and aerial and satellite photography. The text serves primarily as extended captions to the photos, providing information on the ways the pictures were taken and a basic explanation of what the images represent. The large, bright illustrations are beautifully reproduced and present some fascinating views of the world. The subjects range from the very small, such as the head of a bedbug, to the very large and far away, as photographed by the Hubble Space Telescope. This book would work well with an adult who wants to share the wonders of science with young children. Older elementary students will be able to read it on their own, although the striking presentation will also appeal to younger browsers.-Jeffrey A. French, Euclid Public Library, OH Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781936503308
Publisher:
StarWalk Kids Media
Publication date:
02/14/2014
Sold by:
Seymour Science
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
34 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Seymour Simon, whom the New York Times called "the dean of the [children's science] field," is the author of more than 250 highly acclaimed science books, more than seventy-five of which have been named Outstanding Science Trade Books for Children by the National Science Teachers Association. He has introduced tens of millions of children to a staggering array of subjects, and his Collins photo-essay series is co-branded with the Smithsonian Institution, giving them a special seal of approval from a leading authority on science and education. 

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