Out of the Kitchen: Adventures of a Food Writer

Overview

In Out of the Kitchen, food writer Jeannette Ferrary recounts her journey of transition from a young girl ambivalent about food ("women's work") to a career woman immersed in cuisine. Here are the memories, told with humor and warmth, of a childhood in Brooklyn, where her favorite haunts were the candy store and her grandmother's kitchen. Here are the changes she went through as she grew and dealt with feminism, career, marriage, divorce, and childraising. At every step of the way, food played a defining role in ...
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Overview

In Out of the Kitchen, food writer Jeannette Ferrary recounts her journey of transition from a young girl ambivalent about food ("women's work") to a career woman immersed in cuisine. Here are the memories, told with humor and warmth, of a childhood in Brooklyn, where her favorite haunts were the candy store and her grandmother's kitchen. Here are the changes she went through as she grew and dealt with feminism, career, marriage, divorce, and childraising. At every step of the way, food played a defining role in her life. Out of the Kitchen contains portraits of America's most famous food-world celebrities--Julia Child, Alice Waters, Craig Claiborne, Jacques Pepin, Marcella Hazan, and Robert Mondavi, to name a few. It also has two dozen recipes, from Tea for Two for a five-year-old to Gazpacho Andaluz to Apple Pie for Joseph Heller.
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Though to read her recounting, you might just believe that Ferrary accidentally stumbled into food writing and acquaintance with such culinary greats as M.F.K. Fisher, Craig Claiborne, Julia Child, and Alice Waters, her deft touch proves that this was no mere coincidence. Enthusiastically and frankly written, yet with a knowing wink and wry smile, this memoir is delightfully executed, presenting course by course the recollections of a onetime precocious child, "home maker of tomorrow," faculty wife, poet, entrepreneur, activist, and gourmand-as well as the accomplished author of numerous articles appearing in such publications as the New York Times, six cookbooks with Louise Fizer (e.g., Sweet Onions and Sour Cherries), and the memoir M.F.K. Fisher and Me. Recipes follow many of the vignettes, the pairs by turns humorous ("Pummeled Bread") and delicious ("Risotto Californien"). Suitable for all public libraries.-Courtney Greene, DePaul Univ. Lib., Chicago Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The author of M.F.K. Fisher and Me (1991) traces her life from its Brooklyn beginnings, when she couldn't cook and couldn't care less, to writing for the New York Times food section and rubbing shoulders with culinary heroes Julia Child and Alice Waters. Ferrary wasn't always fond of food. Growing up in the 1950s, she watched her mother slave over bland, no-frills Irish meals and, later, Swanson's frozen TV dinners, fearing that "some day, if I wasn't careful, I'd have to do the same damn thing." Her Grandma DeeTee's cooked calamari frightened her. As a newlywed, she relied on Peg Bracken's I Hate to Cook Book for inspiration and, on Thanksgiving, when it came time to roast the turkey and she saw that her oven had only two settings (Broil and Bake), she panicked and phoned Information for advice. (The operator dismissed her as a crank call.) It was only later, when Ferrary went to Guadalajara to study Spanish and was entranced by the fruit, fish, and meat at the local market, that food began to intrigue her. Cooking classes with culinary icon Simone Beck in France led to her first freelance assignment for the San Francisco Examiner's food pages. After reading Ferrary's impassioned review of The Chez Panisse Menu Cookbook, Alice Waters invited her to the landmark Berkeley restaurant and then to a birthday party for longtime New York Times food editor Craig Claiborne, where she found herself hobnobbing in stunned awe with food celebrities like Diana Kennedy, Penelope Casas, and Paul Prudhomme. The author shows great comic timing; her subtle, skillful, yet straightforward prose is funny when you least expect it. Her story about an event with Julia Child-who chastised her for the way she wasmincing garlic by intoning, "Jeannette? What are you doing?"-is only one of many hilarious moments. Inspiring fun for foodies.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781880284780
  • Publisher: Daniel, John & Company, Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/28/2004
  • Pages: 247
  • Sales rank: 1,474,279
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.06 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction : the turkey
I Once upon a time, in Brooklyn
II Betty Crocker homemaker of tomorrow?
III Higher education
IV Getting the message
Epilogue : the Times
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