Outer Banks

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Elegant Kate, walking a tightrope over an abyss of lies...sensitive, sensible, self-contained Cecie...Ginger, the heiress, sexy, vibrant, richer than sin...and poor, hopeless, brilliant Fig — they came together as sorority sisters on a Southern campus in the '60s. Four young women bound by rare, blinding, early friendship — they spend two idyllic spring breaks at Nag's Head, North Carolina, the isolated strip of barrier islands where grand old weatherbeaten houses perch defiantly on the edge of a storm-tossed ...

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Overview

Elegant Kate, walking a tightrope over an abyss of lies...sensitive, sensible, self-contained Cecie...Ginger, the heiress, sexy, vibrant, richer than sin...and poor, hopeless, brilliant Fig — they came together as sorority sisters on a Southern campus in the '60s. Four young women bound by rare, blinding, early friendship — they spend two idyllic spring breaks at Nag's Head, North Carolina, the isolated strip of barrier islands where grand old weatherbeaten houses perch defiantly on the edge of a storm-tossed sea. Now thirty years later, they are coming back. They are coming back to recapture the exquisite magic of those early years...to experience again the love, the enthusiasm, the passion, pain, and cruel-betrayal that shaped the four young girls into women and set them all adrift on the...Outer Banks.

Author Biography:

Anne River Siddons was born in 1936 in Fairburn, Georgia, a small railroad town just south of Atlanta, where her family has lived for six generations. The only child of a prestigious Atlanta lawyer and his wife, Siddons was raised to be a perfect Southern belle. Growing up, she did what was expected of her: getting straight A's, becoming head cheerleader, the homecoming queen, and then Centennial Queen of Fairburn. At Auburn University she studied illustration, joined the Tri-Delt sorority, and "did the things I thought I should. I dated the right guys. I did the right activities," and wound up voted "Loveliest of the Plains."

During her student years at Auburn, the Civil Rights Movement first gained national attention, with the bus boycott in Montgomery and the integration of the University of Alabama. Siddons was a columnistfor the Auburn Plainsman at the time, and she wrote, "an innocuous, almost sophomoric column" welcoming integration. The school's administration requested she pull it, and when she refused, they ran it with a disclaimer stating that the university did not share her views. Because she was writing from the deep South, her column gained instant national attention and caused quite "a fracas." When she wrote a second, similarly-minded piece, she was fired. It was her first taste of the power of the written word.

After graduation, she worked in the advertising department of a large bank, doing layout and design. But she soon discovered her real talents lay in writing, as she was frequently required to write copy for the advertisements. "At Auburn, and before that when I wrote local columns for the Fairburn paper, writing came so naturally that I didn't value it. I never even thought that it might be a livelihood, or a source of great satisfaction. Southern girls, remember, were taught to look for security."

She soon left the bank to join the staff of the recently founded Atlanta magazine. Started by renowned mentor, Jim Townsend, the Atlanta came to life in the 1960's, just as the city Atlanta was experiencing a rebirth. As one of the magazine's first senior editors, Siddons remembers the job as being, "one of the most electrifying things I have ever done in terms of sheer joy." Her work at the magazine brought her in direct contact with the Civil Rights Movement, often sitting with Dr. King's people at the then-black restaurant Carrousel, listening to the best jazz the city had to offer. At age 30, she married Heyward Siddons, eleven years her senior, and the father of four sons from a previous marriage.

Her writing career took its next leap when Larry Ashmead, then an editor at Doubleday, noticed an article of hers and wrote to her asking if she would consider doing a book. She assumed the letter was a prank, and that some of her friends had stolen Doubleday stationary. When she didn't respond, Ashmead tracked her down, and Siddons ended up with a two book contract: a collection of essays which became John Chancellor Makes Me Cry, and a novel of her college days, which became Heartbreak Hotel, and was later turned into a film, Heart of Dixie, starring Ally Sheedy.

As Ashmead moved on, from Doubleday to Simon & Shuster, then to Harper & Row, Siddons followed, writing a horror story, The House Next Door, which Stephen King described as a prime example of "the new American Gothic," and then Fox's Earth and Homeplace, about the loss of a beloved home.

It was in 1988, with the publication of her fifth book, the best-selling Peachtree Road, that Siddons graduated to real commercial success. Described by her friend and peer, Pat Conroy, as "the Southern novel for our generation." With almost a million copies in print, Peachtree Road ushered Siddons onto the literary fast track. Since then the novels have been coming steadily, about one each year, with her readership and writer's fees increasing commensurately. In 1992 she received $3.25 million from HarperCollins for a three book deal, and then, in 1994, HarperCollins gave Siddons $13 million for a four book deal.

Now, she and her Heyward shuttle between a sprawling home in Brookhaven, Atlanta, and their summer home in Brooklin, Maine. She finds Down East, "such a relief after the old dark morass of the South. It's like getting a gulp of clean air...I always feel in Maine like I'm walking on the surface of the earth. In the South, I always feel like I'm knee-deep." But she still remains tied to her home in the South, where she does most of her writing. Each morning, Siddons dresses, puts on her makeup and then heads out to the backyard cottage that serves as her office. And each night, she and her husband edit the day's work by reading it aloud over evening cocktails.

Siddons' success has naturally brought comparisons with another great Southern writer, Margaret Mitchell, but Siddons insists that the South she writes about is not the romanticized version found in Gone With the Wind. Instead, her relationship with the South is loving, but realistic. "It's like an old marriage or a long marriage. The commitment is absolute, but the romance has long since worn off...I want to write about it as it really is: I don't want to romanticize it."

The New York Times #1 bestselling author of King's Oak offers a touching novel of betrayal, madness, love, and redemption. As sorority sisters in the '60s, four young women came together and were bound by rare, blinding, early friendship. The two spring breaks they spent at Nag's Head were idyllic. Now they return to the North Carolina setting to recapture those early years--and to set free the pain that caused them all to drift apart. Simultaneous hardcover release of Colony.

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Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
Yet another southern gothic twister from Siddons—though this time the author edges into the emotionally honest territory of, say, a Gail Godwin, right up until the very end, when she slams the melodramatic gas pedal to the floor. But things start out reasonably and interestingly enough, with middle-aged Kate Lee, a recent cancer patient who feels sure the little cancer "Pac-Men" are gobbling her again. Her husband, Alan, forces her to accept an invitation from an old sorority sister, Ginger Fowler, who stole Kate's true love, architecture student Paul Sibley, from her 28 years ago. Also to be present at the reunion on the North Carolina coast are Cecie Hart, Kate's once-closest friend (from whom she hasn't heard a word since graduation), and Georgina—a.k.a. Fig—Newton, a weird little cookie who had a hopeless crush on Kate back at Randolph University in Alabama. Kate plans to commit suicide right after the visit, but once the friends see each other again, things get complicated. She and Cecie bond once more; Ginger's hit the bottle, realizing that Paul married her only for her dough; and Fig's become a bestselling romance writer. To make matters worse, Paul arrives, begging Kate to come back to him. And she almost does, until he shows his true skunkish stripes—which would leave Kate resolved to live and return to Alan, were it not for Fig, who's decided to get her revenge for the way she disdained her all through college.... Siddons fans will be enthralled; indeed, this is a much more emotionally gripping novel than her last, King's Oak. But it won't woo readers who want to see the characters they've been following settle their problems without wild effects andplot tricks.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781578150441
  • Publisher: Media Books, L. L. C.
  • Publication date: 1/28/2000
  • Format: Cassette
  • Edition description: 2 Cassettes
  • Product dimensions: 4.25 (w) x 7.15 (h) x 0.68 (d)

Meet the Author

Anne Rivers Siddons's bestselling novels include Nora, Nora; Sweetwater Creek; Islands; and Fox's Earth. She is also the author of the nonfiction work John Chancellor Makes Me Cry. She and her husband divide their time between Charleston, South Carolina, and Brooklin, Maine.

Biography

Born in 1936 in a small town near Atlanta, Anne Rivers Siddons was raised to be a dutiful daughter of the South -- popular, well-mannered, studious, and observant of all the cultural mores of time and place. She attended Alabama's Auburn University in the mid-1950s, just as the Civil Rights Movement was gathering steam. Siddons worked on the staff of Auburn's student newspaper and wrote an editorial in favor of integration. When the administration asked her to pull the piece, she refused. The column ran with an official disclaimer from the university, attracting national attention and giving young Siddons her first taste of the power of the written word.

After a brief stint in the advertising department of a bank, Siddons took a position with the up and coming regional magazine Atlanta, where she worked her way up to senior editor. Impressed by her writing ability, an editor at Doubleday offered her a two-book contract. She debuted in 1975 with a collection of nonfiction essays; the following year, she published Heartbreak Hotel, a semi-autobiographical novel about a privileged Southern coed who comes of age during the summer of 1956.

With the notable exception of 1978's The House Next Door, a chilling contemporary gothic compared by Stephen King to Shirley Jackson's classic horror novel The Haunting of Hill House, Siddons has produced a string of well-written, imaginative, and emotionally resonant stories of love and loss -- all firmly rooted in the culture of the modern South. Her books are consistent bestsellers, with 1988's Peachtree Road (1988) arguably her biggest commercial success. Described by her friend and peer, Pat Conroy, as "the Southern novel for our generation," the book sheds illuminating light on the changing landscape of mid-20th-century Atlanta society.

Although her status as a "regional" writer accounts partially for Siddons' appeal, ultimately fans love her books because they portray with compassion and truth the real lives of women who transcend the difficulties of love and marriage, family, friendship, and growing up.

Good To Know

Although she is often compared with another Atlanta author, Margaret Mitchel, Siddons insists that the South she writes about is not the romanticized version found in Gone With the Wind. Instead, her relationship with the region is loving, but realistic. "It's like an old marriage or a long marriage. The commitment is absolute, but the romance has long since worn off...I want to write about it as it really is: I don't want to romanticize it."

Siddons' debut novel Heartberak Hotel was turned into the 1989 movie Heart of Dixie, starry Ally Sheedy, Virginia Madsen, and Phoebe Cates.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Sybil Anne Rivers Siddons (full name)
    2. Hometown:
      Charleston, South Carolina and a summer home in Maine overlooking Penobscot Bay
    1. Date of Birth:
      January 9, 1936
    2. Place of Birth:
      Atlanta, Georgia
    1. Education:
      B.A., Auburn University, 1958; Atlanta School of Art, 1958

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

On the Outer Banks of North Carolina there is a legend about the ships that have come to grief in the great autumn storms off those hungry shoals. Over the centuries there have been many; the Banks have more than earned their reputation as the Graveyard of the Atlantic. Most of the graves are in Diamond Shoals, just off the point of Cape Hatteras, but the entire hundred-odd-mile sweep of coast has devoured its measure of wood and flesh. Myths and spectres and apparitions he as thick as sea fog over the Banks, but the one that I have always remembered is the one Ginger Fowler told us all...Cecie, Fig, Paul Sibley, and me...the September of my last year in college, when we were visiting her between quarters.

"They say that whenever a ship is going to go down you can hear something like singing in the wind," she said. "Bankers say it's mermaids, calling the sailors. Lots of them claim to have heard it. It's not like wind or anything. They say when you hear it, you have no choice but to follow it, and you end up on the shoals. A few of the sailors who've been rescued swear to it."

We were sitting on the front veranda of the Fowlers' house on the dunes on Nag's Head beach, watching the twilight die over the Atlantic. On either side of us hulked the great, black-weathered, two- and three-story cottages that made up what the Bankers call the Unpainted Aristocracy -- along line of huge, weather-stained wooden summer houses that had been built in the early days of the century by the very rich. When they were first built, the houses reigned alone on that lordly line of dunes, owning by sheer forcemajeure the wild, empty beach. Now they are surrounded by flealike armies of bungalows and time-shares and fishing piers and umbrella and float rentals, like mastodons beset by pygmies. But even now, when you are on the front porches or verandas, you have no sense of the graceless, idiot hordes nibbling at their skirts. Only of wind and sun and emptiness, and the endless sea.

I remember that I felt a small frisson that might have been night wind on sunburned flesh, and reached for Paul's hand. He squeezed it, but did not turn to look at me. He was looking intently at Ginger's sweet, snub face, stained red by the sun setting behind us over Roanoke Sound and by the long, golden days in the sun. Autumn on the Outer Banks is purely a sorcerer's spell: so clear you can see each grain of sand on the great dunes, and bathed in a light that is indescribable. We had stayed on the beach from dawn to sunset for the past four days, and all of us wore the stigmata on our cheeks and shoulders. But Ginger was the red-brown of cast bronze all over. The freckles on her broad cheekbones had merged in a copper mask, and her eyelashes and tow head had whitened. She looked like a piece of Mayan statuary in her faded cotton bathing suit with the boy-cut legs, squat and abundant and solid as the earth.

I thought she looked almost perfectly a piece of the old house and the older coast, but in fact her father had only bought the house two summers before, from an imperious old widow who was going, most reluctantly, to live with her children in Wilmington. Before that Ginger had summered at Gulf Shores, on the Alabama coast, and lived with her family in a small north Alabama town called, appropriately, Fowler. It consisted of a huge textile mill, a mill village and store, and little else, all of which belonged to Ginger's father. The Fowlers; were newly, enormously, and to us, almost inconceivably rich. Ginger worked very hard to conceal the fact, and succeeded so well that until we went to visit her on the Outer Banks, and saw the house, we did not really comprehend it. Fig had told us when she proposed Ginger for sisterhood in Tri Omega that Ginger had a trust fund of her own approaching five million dollars; in those days that was a breathtaking sum of money. But since none of us paid much attention to what Fig said, we either forgot it or discounted it. In the end, Ginger became a Tri Omega because we all loved her. It was impossible not to. She was as gregarious, sweet-natured, and simple as a golden retriever.

"And," Cecie observed thoughtfully, "looks not unlike one."

On the darkening porch that night at Nag's Head, Paul smiled at Ginger and said, "Have you heard the mermaids singing, Ginger?" and the little cold breath on my nape and shoulders strengthened.

"God, no," she said. "It would scare the bejesus out of me. I hope I never do."

"I wish I could," he said, and then he did look at me, and squeezed my hand again. "That would be something to hear. I think that would be worth just about anything."

I actually shivered; it seemed to me as if the very air around us had weight and meaning, and every, whirling atom had particularity and portent. But I was so much in love with him by then that everything he said, everything we did, everything that surrounded us, our entire context, had resonance and purpose. Cecie looked at me and then at Paul, and said, "I think I'll go make some tea," and rose and padded into the house. I watched her out of sight, thinking once more how like a small, slender boy she looked in silhouette, wishing that she liked Paul better.

Outer Banks. Copyright © by Anne Rivers Siddons. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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First Chapter

Chapter One

On the Outer Banks of North Carolina there is a legend about the ships that have come to grief in the great autumn storms off those hungry shoals. Over the centuries there have been many; the Banks have more than earned their reputation as the Graveyard of the Atlantic. Most of the graves are in Diamond Shoals, just off the point of Cape Hatteras, but the entire hundred-odd-mile sweep of coast has devoured its measure of wood and flesh. Myths and spectres and apparitions he as thick as sea fog over the Banks, but the one that I have always remembered is the one Ginger Fowler told us all...Cecie, Fig, Paul Sibley, and me...the September of my last year in college, when we were visiting her between quarters.

"They say that whenever a ship is going to go down you can hear something like singing in the wind," she said. "Bankers say it's mermaids, calling the sailors. Lots of them claim to have heard it. It's not like wind or anything. They say when you hear it, you have no choice but to follow it, and you end up on the shoals. A few of the sailors who've been rescued swear to it."

We were sitting on the front veranda of the Fowlers' house on the dunes on Nag's Head beach, watching the twilight die over the Atlantic. On either side of us hulked the great, black-weathered, two- and three-story cottages that made up what the Bankers call the Unpainted Aristocracy -- along line of huge, weather-stained wooden summer houses that had been built in the early days of the century by the very rich. When they were first built, the houses reigned alone on that lordly line of dunes, owning by sheer forcemajeure the wild, empty beach. Now they are surrounded by flealike armies of bungalows and time-shares and fishing piers and umbrella and float rentals, like mastodons beset by pygmies. But even now, when you are on the front porches or verandas, you have no sense of the graceless, idiot hordes nibbling at their skirts. Only of wind and sun and emptiness, and the endless sea.

I remember that I felt a small frisson that might have been night wind on sunburned flesh, and reached for Paul's hand. He squeezed it, but did not turn to look at me. He was looking intently at Ginger's sweet, snub face, stained red by the sun setting behind us over Roanoke Sound and by the long, golden days in the sun. Autumn on the Outer Banks is purely a sorcerer's spell: so clear you can see each grain of sand on the great dunes, and bathed in a light that is indescribable. We had stayed on the beach from dawn to sunset for the past four days, and all of us wore the stigmata on our cheeks and shoulders. But Ginger was the red-brown of cast bronze all over. The freckles on her broad cheekbones had merged in a copper mask, and her eyelashes and tow head had whitened. She looked like a piece of Mayan statuary in her faded cotton bathing suit with the boy-cut legs, squat and abundant and solid as the earth.

I thought she looked almost perfectly a piece of the old house and the older coast, but in fact her father had only bought the house two summers before, from an imperious old widow who was going, most reluctantly, to live with her children in Wilmington. Before that Ginger had summered at Gulf Shores, on the Alabama coast, and lived with her family in a small north Alabama town called, appropriately, Fowler. It consisted of a huge textile mill, a mill village and store, and little else, all of which belonged to Ginger's father. The Fowlers; were newly, enormously, and to us, almost inconceivably rich. Ginger worked very hard to conceal the fact, and succeeded so well that until we went to visit her on the Outer Banks, and saw the house, we did not really comprehend it. Fig had told us when she proposed Ginger for sisterhood in Tri Omega that Ginger had a trust fund of her own approaching five million dollars; in those days that was a breathtaking sum of money. But since none of us paid much attention to what Fig said, we either forgot it or discounted it. In the end, Ginger became a Tri Omega because we all loved her. It was impossible not to. She was as gregarious, sweet-natured, and simple as a golden retriever.

"And," Cecie observed thoughtfully, "looks not unlike one."

On the darkening porch that night at Nag's Head, Paul smiled at Ginger and said, "Have you heard the mermaids singing, Ginger?" and the little cold breath on my nape and shoulders strengthened.

"God, no," she said. "It would scare the bejesus out of me. I hope I never do."

"I wish I could," he said, and then he did look at me, and squeezed my hand again. "That would be something to hear. I think that would be worth just about anything."

I actually shivered; it seemed to me as if the very air around us had weight and meaning, and every, whirling atom had particularity and portent. But I was so much in love with him by then that everything he said, everything we did, everything that surrounded us, our entire context, had resonance and purpose. Cecie looked at me and then at Paul, and said, "I think I'll go make some tea," and rose and padded into the house. I watched her out of sight, thinking once more how like a small, slender boy she looked in silhouette, wishing that she liked Paul better.

Outer Banks. Copyright © by Anne Rivers Siddons. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Reading Group Guide

"Friendships between women are very complicated things, and not necessarily sweet. But I think those earliest friendships are some of the most formative of our entire lives. At 18, we're such unfinished people. When you come back together later, everybody's battered, beaten up, kicked. We're profoundly different people, and we're often wounded adults. We found the capacity of those old friendships was to heal. It was not only a vacation for us. But most of us went away feeling a lot wholer, and in some ways comforted."
Plot Summary
On a Southern campus in the 1960's, four young, disparate women come together as sorority suite-mates and share a rare, powerful early friendship. There is Kate, with her elegance and grace; Cecie, the sensitive and sensible one; Ginger, the gorgeous, unbelievably rich girl who refuses to grow up; and Fig, the doting, diminutive, misshapen girl with the brilliant mind. As Fig watches from a distance, carefully noting everything down in her diary, Ginger embarks on a wild, scandalous life, and the bond between Kate and Cecie deepens. That bond is tested with the arrival on campus of Paul Sibley, a sexy and brilliant, half-Seminole architecture student. Kate and Paul fall hopelessly in love and begin planning for their future by designing their dream house; she doing the interior designing, and he the architecture. But when Kate moves to New York to begin their joint career, Paul writes to inform her that he is marrying Ginger instead. Plunged into agonizing despair, Kate rebounds into the arms of an affable Jewish architect, Alan Abrams, and, in her pain, breaks off all contact with her old sorority sisters. Twenty-eightyears later, Fig plans a reunion of the four women at Ginger's home at Nag's Head, North Carolina, the beautiful, weather-beaten house in which they all shared two idyllic spring breaks. Now the women return to recapture the exquisite magic of those early years and to share again the love, enthusiasm, passion and cruel betrayal that shaped them from girls into women. What they don't realize is that Fig, now a wildly successful novelist, has planned a very special surprise for her sisters; one that will irrevocably alter the rest of their lives.

Topics for Discussion
1. According to Ginger, "whenever a ship is going to go down you can hear something like singing in the wind. Bankers say it's mermaids calling the sailors . . . they say when you hear it, you have no choice but to follow it, and you end up on the shoals." What is the significance of this myth for Siddons' characters? Did any of them hear the mermaids singing, yet not "end up on the shoals?" If so, what saved them? Who are the mermaids in Kate's life?

2. Kate can't help but imagine her cancer cells as microscopic "Pacmen." How might this metaphor help her? How does it harm her? What is it that finally enables her to no longer fear the Pacmen? What does she mean when she thinks the Pacmen, "went with that other Kate, when she died on the Outer Banks?"

3. What does Kate mean when she refers to herself as an "abyss walker?" What is her abyss? Do you consider yourself one of the "non-abyss-people?" What role does her father's suicide play in Kate's understanding of her own abyss?

4. Kate muses, "how truly terrible, that it is easier to live a total lie, become a lie yourself, than assimilate to the hated truth." Which characters weave fictitious lives for themselves? And why? What is it that forces each of them to confront reality?

5. How are the four grown women who return to the Outer Banks different from the young sorority sisters they were 28 years ago? Which of them have been "battered, beaten up, kicked" by life the most? How so?

6. How would you characterize the different kinds of friendships and loves explored in Outer Banks? Which have the capacity to heal, and which to harm? Is it possible to have one without the other?

7. Why do you think this novel was set on the Outer Banks? What role does the sea play in these characters' lives? Why are they all drawn to the ocean? How relevant are the pirate and mermaid myths for these characters?

8. What is it about Dorothy Parker's poetry that so captivates the young Kate and Cecie? What is their relationship to her acerbic lines as they get older? Why do you think it changes?

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Customer Reviews

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2009

    Enjoyable and Easy Reading

    Siddons books never fail to provide hours of reading enjoyment. She doesn't disappoint with this one, engrossing characters and plot.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 15, 2009

    A definite thrill ride!

    I am a fan of Anne Rivers Siddons but this is one of my favorite summer books to read. I actually read this while in the Outer Banks with friends. As we traveled to Ocracoke for the day, I had my husband drive slowly through Hatteras as my friend and I looked for any trace of the Carolina Moon cottages! Once you begin the journey with these characters, hold on for the ride. The last few pages are action packed and really pull the whole character study/story together. A definite read!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 9, 2009

    This is one of my favorite novels by my favorite novelist.

    This is a wonderful novel about friendship and its rewards and betrayals. A very satisfying read which makes you love and/or hate the characters. One of my all-time faves.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2013

    One of my favorite aithors

    Southern gothic...the female Pat Conroy...this book not as grrat as some of her others like Low Coumtry and Peachttre Road. But her imagery, particularly of beaches, always transports me. The endimg of this one was pretty weird.

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  • Posted July 8, 2013

    This is the first Anne Rivers Siddons book I've read - at first,

    This is the first Anne Rivers Siddons book I've read - at first, I felt as though the book dragged a bit, but once I got into the characters I wasn't able to put it down.  I thought her descriptions of her characters was fantastic.  The ending was a bit odd and didn't quite seem to fit with the rest of the book, but when I thought back on it I knew there was something weird going on there.  Overall, a great and enjoyable read.

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  • Posted June 14, 2013

    I've never read any books by Anne Rivers Siddons but thought I'd

    I've never read any books by Anne Rivers Siddons but thought I'd try this one since it got fairly good reviews and was only 99 cents for my Nook.  It's awful!  I got 17 pages in and just can't continue.  The writing is herky jerky and I can't follow the story or characters at all!  There seems to be no flow to it.  Maybe that gets better and I tried 3 times to continue reading it but it's not enjoyable!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2012

    Fawnstep

    Thats ok.dont worry about it.care u in any clans?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2012

    ??????

    What is snowclan? Dont order me to not post.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 26, 2012

    Seril

    Nope. Btw i hate you get out of my life

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2012

    The dream bank.

    Write down your name and a brief discription of your dream.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2012

    Almost good.

    This was an enjoyable read until the absurd ending. It was like the author ran out of time or ideas. What a let down.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2011

    Outer Banks

    Very interesting story - did have the tendency to drag in spots - would've have given it 5 stars if I wasn't an Outer Banks native and very displeased with some of the descriptions of our island.

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  • Posted July 26, 2011

    Can be a bit wordy and overly descrptive but has a good twist at the end.

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  • Posted July 22, 2011

    Worth 2nd read

    Reaf it whenn it first came out and then again this month! Enjoyedit just as much the second go round.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2005

    Heartwrenching honesty of revisiting self-defining friendships and buried heartache

    I was glued to the book. Anne captures the lively characters' emotions and dreams while spinning a twisted plot that stresses the power of friendship, intuition, and compassion. Just enough of all the right elements to make you wish the book has twice as many pages. 'Peachtree Road' is also an excellent SIddons novel.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2003

    SUPER !!!

    I agree with most of the other reviewers -- its smooth and a can't put down book!! A MUST READ for women that were college age in the early 60's. This is for sure one that you can sink into and only want to sink deeper!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2003

    Fabulous! My first Siddons experience!

    I borrowed this from my father, strangely enough. He couldn't put it down and knew I would love it. If you are from the South you will immediately relate. Reading it in a 'southern belle' drawl will make it even more enjoyable! I thought that Siddons captured a lot of the truth Southern women know about life and painted an accurate picture of the fairy tales we often dream before we realize that truth. I will read others by her. I certainly recommend this one!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2001

    I loved this book!!

    There is nothing better than sinking deeply into a story and I did just that when I read this book. I couldn't put it down. The author has a wonderful way of describing her characters and giving life to each of them. I bought this book and all the others she has written but this is my favorite!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2001

    First and last of Siddons I will read.

    This is the first and last Siddons book I will read. Characters are drab and impaired; plot drags and all I can say was it was a miracle that I finished it....boring!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2000

    A fast read

    This book was great... it made me reminisce of sorority life and college. The ending was a bit strange, however everything else was fabulous so worth the read.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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