Outer Banks Architecture: An Anthology of Outposts, Lodges and Cottages

Overview

The 4 million annual visitors to North Carolina's Outer Banks would be amazed if they could see the place as it was 150 years ago, when there was no human habitation on the oceanfront. The few villages huddled on the sound side of the barrier islands, away from the vengeful Atlantic.

That began to change after the Civil War, when the government made the shipping lanes off the Outer Banks less hazardous by constructing lifesaving stations and a new generation of lighthouses. ...

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Overview

The 4 million annual visitors to North Carolina's Outer Banks would be amazed if they could see the place as it was 150 years ago, when there was no human habitation on the oceanfront. The few villages huddled on the sound side of the barrier islands, away from the vengeful Atlantic.

That began to change after the Civil War, when the government made the shipping lanes off the Outer Banks less hazardous by constructing lifesaving stations and a new generation of lighthouses. Around that same time, wealthy Northerners began buying Outer Banks property to create exclusive hunt clubs, and the affluent citizens of North Carolina's upper Albemarle started building cottages at Old Nags Head. The late 1940s saw the beginning of another vernacular style -- the famous Flat Top cottages of Southern Shores.

The facts, anecdotes, and photos in Outer Banks Architecture form an anthology of the area's most notable structures. These range from the simple (like the Outlaw Cottage at Old Nags Head) to the spectacular (like the Whalehead Club in Corolla). If you've never seen Frank Stick's original Flat Top, the Chicamacomico Lifesaving Station (where two restored stations of different eras stand on the same site), or the Currituck Shooting Club (the oldest hunt club in North America), this book will help you peel back today's development and discover the Banks as they were in days past.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780895871923
  • Publisher: Blair, John F. Publisher
  • Publication date: 4/28/2000
  • Pages: 114
  • Sales rank: 1,328,031
  • Product dimensions: 8.01 (w) x 8.99 (h) x 0.34 (d)

Read an Excerpt

Phase I of Southern Shores opened in 1946 with fifty oceanfront building sites offered in pairs for $2,000. No lots sold that first year. The success of Millionaire's Row had taught Frank Stick that improved building sites sold more quickly than vacant lots, but lumber and other traditional building supplies were still reserved for government use. This stalled the construction of new homes. Desperate to show some profit, Stick decided to build himself a house. In the process, he created a new vernacular architectural form—The Flat Top. . . .

Stick lured Hatteras Islander, Curtis Grey to move to Kitty Hawk. Together they set up a factory in Kitty Hawk Village that manufactured 42-pound bricks from sand mined from local beaches. These cement blocks were the principal material used to construct Flat Top cottages until the mid-1950s when the North Carolina legislature banned the use of beach gravel for manufacturing concrete. . . .

Three of the first five Flat Tops, built between 1947-48, have survived. They are Frank Stick's own home, the Taylor-Covington house, and Grandmother Graves' cottage.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix
Introduction xi
Outposts
Light Keepers' Dwellings and Lifesaving Stations 1
Light Keepers' Dwellings 7
Ocracoke Light Station 9
Cape Hatteras Light Station 9
Bodie Island Light Station 13
Currituck Beach Light Station 17
The United States Lifesaving Service in North Carolina 22
Portsmouth Island Lifesaving Station 26
Little Kinnakeet Lifesaving Station 29
Chicamacomico Lifesaving Station 32
Chatham-Type Stations 36
Lodges
Hunt Clubs from Currituck to Carteret 37
Birds of a Feather: The Currituck Shooting Club 42
Once upon Corolla Island: The Whalehead Club 48
Pine Island Audubon Sanctuary: The Pine Island Club 55
Cottages
Old Nags Head and Southern Shores 63
Old Nags Head: Beach Cottage Row 67
The Outlaw Cottage 70
The Winston Cottage 73
The Whedbee Cottage 74
Frank Stick and the Southern Shores Flat Top 77
The First Southern Shores Flat Top: The Stick-Miller Home 85
"Portsmouth Tide": The Graves Cottage 86
"Craving Nostalgia": The Taylor-Smith-Covington Cottage 89
"Barefoot Elegance": The Smith-Millican-Garrett Home 92
"The Pink House": The Roth Cottage 95
"Pink Perfection": The Pipkin Cottage 97
Appendix The Lifesaving Stations: Where Are They Now? 100
Bibliography 104
Glossary 107
Index 109
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