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Outer Planets
     

Outer Planets

by Glenn F. Chaple, Timothy F. Slater (Editor), Lauren V. Jones (Editor)
 

Our knowledge of the universe has increased tremendously over the last century. We now know that our Milky Way galaxy is but one of hundreds of billions of galaxies; our solar system is not unique, since scientists have found other planets circling other stars throughout the galaxy. And our discoveries are not over - there still exist mysteries to be solved by the

Overview

Our knowledge of the universe has increased tremendously over the last century. We now know that our Milky Way galaxy is but one of hundreds of billions of galaxies; our solar system is not unique, since scientists have found other planets circling other stars throughout the galaxy. And our discoveries are not over - there still exist mysteries to be solved by the next generation of astronomers

The Greenwood Guides to the Universe series provides readers with the most up-to-date understanding of the state of astronomical knowledge, as well as an introduction to how scientists discover facts about bodies that are, in some cases, billions of light years away. Volumes focus on various areas of astronomical knowledge and are thematically organized, include illustrations, glossaries, and bibliographies to help students better understand the concepts at hand

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"A long-time avid amateur astronomer living in Massachusetts, Chaple profiles the Jovian planets, that is the gas giants and their many moons, but not the former planet Pluto. His topics include the birth of the Jovian planets, Jupiter's moons as a solar system in miniature, Saturn as the crown jewel of the Solar System (the full sized one), the tipped-over world
Uranus, Neptune the planet discovered on paper, Jovian planets beyond our solar system, and Voyager 2's grand tour." - SciTech Book News

". . .contain[s] basic information to help the reader understand this ever-changing topic." - ARBAonline

". . . this volume will be a valuable complement and update for either general science encyclopedias or specific ones such as Paul Murdin's Encyclopedia of Astronomy and Astrophysics (Nature Publishing Group, 2001)."

- School Library Journal

"The book is best suited to junior and senior high school students, as well as lay readers who wish to learn about the history and phenomenology of the outer planets of our solar system, including some curious anecdotes to enliven the factual summaries. High recommended. Libraries serving high school students and general readers." - Choice

"The author's writing style takes a very complex, scientific subject and breaks it down into chapters that are understandable and interesting for the amateur enthusiast, with detailed information for the researcher looking for a credible source. Recommended." - Library Media Connection

VOYA - Susan Allen
It's the twentieth anniversary of the Hubble telescope launching—what better time to look at astronomy books? The Greenwood Guides to the Universe seven-volume series includes The Sun, The Inner Planets, Stars and Galaxies, Asteroids, Comets, Dwarf Planets, and The Outer Planets. The writing is accessible to most high school students, and the content is interesting for the browser but includes enough depth and breadth for more serious researchers. The information is as current as possible. The Outer Planets is emblematic of the series and contains black and white photos and charts, as well as several appendices on planetary data, the chemistry of the outer planets, a timeline, and resources including websites, organizations and publications. There is an extensive glossary, as well as a bibliography and an index. This set will be used for reports and for those interested in astronomy. It is a great choice for updating your collection in this changing scientific area. Reviewer: Susan Allen
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up—Aimed at motivated nonspecialists, these volumes (two of seven, all available individually or as a set) fall short in the illustration department, but offer generous measures of specific, up-to-date, systematically presented information. Chaple surveys the gas giants and their moons, adding discussions of Jovian-type planets orbiting other stars and the Voyager 2 space mission. Covering the solar system's non-moon smaller bodies, from comets plunging out of the distant Oort Cloud to NEO (Near Earth Objects) asteroids and hypothetical "Vulcan Objects" spinning around the Sun inside Mercury's orbit, Rivkin devotes chapters to orbits, compositions, origins, and relevant space probe missions. Both volumes also fill in the historical background of our astronomical observations and provide annotated lists of Web sites at each chapter's end and other helpful resources in the back matter. As prose stylists, Chaple is the livelier of the two, supplying, for instance, enticing discussions of future tourist sites on each planet's moons ("Honeymooners, why go to Niagara Falls, when you can come to Mimas and enjoy the romance of Saturn!") and explaining how to pronounce "Uranus" without hearing giggles. Despite the few small, murky black-and-white photos and a scanty assortment of diagrams, these volumes will be valuable complements and updates for either general science encyclopedias or specific ones such as Paul Murdin's Encyclopedia of Astronomy and Astrophysics (Nature Publishing Group, 2001).—John Peters, New York Public Library

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780313365706
Publisher:
ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
Publication date:
09/16/2009
Series:
Greenwood Guides to the Universe Series
Pages:
199
Product dimensions:
7.10(w) x 10.20(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
14 Years

Meet the Author

Glenn Chaple's lifelong interest in astronomy began when a high school friend showed him the planet Saturn through a backyard telescope. After receiving a BS Degree in Astronomy from the University of Massachusetts, he worked briefly as a planetarium lecturer before becoming a middle school science teacher. He has published articles in Deep Sky Magazine and the children's astronomy magazine Odyssey, and is the author of the book Exploring With a Telescope (1988.) A contributing editor to Astronomy Magazine, he shares his astronomical exploits in the monthly beginner's column Glenn Chaple's Observing Basics.

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