The Outline Of History

The Outline Of History

3.3 68
by H. G. Wells
     
 

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Originally published in 1919, this early work by legendary English author H. G. Wells is both expensive and hard to find in its first edition. Its 667 pages contain a wealth of information on the history of humanity and include chapters on The First Civilisations, The Languages of Mankind, The Greeks and the Persians and much more. This ambitious and fascinating work

Overview

Originally published in 1919, this early work by legendary English author H. G. Wells is both expensive and hard to find in its first edition. Its 667 pages contain a wealth of information on the history of humanity and include chapters on The First Civilisations, The Languages of Mankind, The Greeks and the Persians and much more. This ambitious and fascinating work was written by Wells in response to the poor textbooks of his time and is thoroughly recommended for those interested in the history of Man. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781445562575
Publisher:
Read Books Design
Publication date:
04/02/2010
Pages:
670
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.48(d)

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The Outline of History: Volume 1, Prehistory to the Roman Republic (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 67 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
HG Wells' Outline of History is the best and most important history book I've ever read, 'BA in history and political science 25 years ago, and still an avid student of these subjects'. Offers essential insight into where the human race has come from, which is key to understanding where we are and where we are going.
UncleDavy More than 1 year ago
I've known about this book fot years but could never find it. I'm glad I finally did. I've always felt that History when it is well written is exciting to read. History when it is poorly written is a chore to read. Welles' History proves that he was a great writer. This is exciting and fun to read. Although he is very critical of Alexander, Julius Caesar, and Rome.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Greatest Story Ever Told! I am eternally grateful that Barnes and Noble has republished this classic two-volume text on world history. I own both the two-volume Barnes and Nobles editions as well as the 1971 edition that extends the narrative after World War 1, including World War 2, the formation of the U.N., the Cold War, and the Space Race. The Outline of History is the best and most underrated book by H. G. Wells, the father of science fiction and universal history, much better than all his scientific romances combined since it is actually a true story. It is a supremely written universal history and it tells the epic adventure of the history of the world, life, and mankind according to the sciences of astronomy, biology, geology, anthropology, and world history. This is the modern scientific worldview expounded by Wells in the early twentieth century and the secular Bible of the modern era. As one of the greatest English writers in history, Wells shows great insight into the changes and meanings of world history, adding plenty of colorful descriptions and analogies to explain complex processes as well as many witty satirical remarks. Naturally, the book is biased in its materialism, biocentrism, and scientism, but it tries and largely succeeds in remaining objective, historical, and scientific throughout. The book spans from the origins of the solar system to the outbreak of World War 1, ending with final speculations about the possible future formation of a world state and global government. Based on the Newtonian science of the time, Wells speculates that the universe, the totality of space and time, has existed for billions of years or has existed for an infinite amount of time. After dealing with the origin and evolution of our planet, the story follows the Darwinian science of the time and covers the origin of life in the first seas and the evolution of life towards dry land, the sky, and beyond. The geological ages covered include the Ages of Fish, Amphibians, Reptiles, Mammals and Birds, Apes and Submen, and finally Mankind. Despite the subsequent progressive ages, the Paleolithic Age, the Neolithic Age, the Industrial Age, and the various imperial ages of the Persians, Greeks, Romans, Mongols, Arabs, and later Europeans, the many wars detailed in the book and the evolutionary struggle for existence prove that history is more nature red in tooth and claw and more about the march of armies than the march of progress, knowledge, and enlightenment. The book likewise covers the history of religion, including paganism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism, giving interesting biographies of the major founders of these great but outdated faiths. The book largely follows the increasing complexity of life and civilization on earth. Despite the sufferings and tragedies of world history, life moves on and slowly progresses, perpetually dying as the old generation and being reborn as the new generation, and the range of life widens until the modern era when life has left our little planet and started to explore the wider universe. Thus, humanity finds itself on the path either to self-imposed destruction by modern global warfare or to further social and biological evolution in the formation of a world state and the colonization of space. It appears despite the sheer length of this epic story, we are merely at the twilight of the dawn and future history will be far longer and greater than all the history already recorded, if we don’t blow ourselves up first of course. I’d recommend this book as the ultimate encyclopedia, but I would recommend that readers first buy and read its abridgement, A Short History of the World (Penguin Classics), as preparation for this much fuller and larger two-volume world history. This story is clearly the greatest story ever told!
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benoit11 More than 1 year ago
Very good overview that gets into more depth as it gets closer to more modern times.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Will read it again.
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