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An Outline of the Bible
     

An Outline of the Bible

5.0 1
by Benson Y. Landis
 

An Outline of the Bible: Book by Book is an aid to understanding the Bible for both students and general readers. It includes a summary of contents and information on authorship, historical background and literary style of each book of the King James Version. Maps and a glossary are also included.

Overview

An Outline of the Bible: Book by Book is an aid to understanding the Bible for both students and general readers. It includes a summary of contents and information on authorship, historical background and literary style of each book of the King James Version. Maps and a glossary are also included.

Editorial Reviews

Adult Leadership
An invaluable outline...to aid any reader of the Bible.
Living Church
Surpassing similar production in print, which tend either to be pious or to be critically opinionated.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780064632638
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
02/28/1994
Edition description:
Reissue
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
1,370,460
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 10.88(h) x 0.50(d)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

The Old Testament,
Book By Book

The first five books of the Bible are variously called the books of Moses, the Law, or the Pentateuch (from a Greek word meaning a "five-volumed" document). Some scholars give the name Hexateuch to the first six books (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, and Joshua) on the theory that Joshua is logically part of the same group of writings.

Genesis

Genesis, meaning "in the beginning," is the first book of the Bible. It narrates the history of Israel from the Creation to the death of Joseph. It contains primitive accounts of the creation of the world and the dispersion of peoples following the Flood, and it tells about the lives of the patriarchs Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, along with the story of Joseph's career in Egypt. It transmits the traditions of the Hebrew people about their earliest settlements and about the men and women who founded the leading families of the "Chosen People."

The book of Genesis is a witness to the origin and early stages of the religion of the people of Israel. Everywhere there are evidences of the emergence of vital faith. Religious purpose and feeling are earnestly manifested, and the struggles of men and women committed to a belief in one supreme and personal God are recorded.

Jewish tradition accredited Moses as author or compiler of the first five books, and early Christian scholars took the same view. Much later scholarship, however, points to the works as a composite with distinct variations. Moses may have been a contributor, but it appears that the firstfive or six books were in process of writing and compilation probably before 1000 B.C. and down to 300 B.C., with authors or editors unknown.

Genesis is divided into two parts: that dealing with primeval history of mankind; and that dealing with the lives of the patriarchs.

Primeval History of Mankind (1-11:9). The final compilers evidently wished to combine early primitive accounts with those about the patriarchs of Israel. The first and well-known verses on the creation of heaven and earth read thus:

In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.
And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.

And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.
And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness.

And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And the evening and the morning were the first day. (1: 1-5).

Then God made the firmament and the waters and two great lights, one for the day and the other for the night. "He made the stars also." He created "great whales, and every living creature that moveth." "God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them" (1:27). "And God saw every thing that he had made, and, behold, it was very good" (1:31).

Adam And Eve. Adam, the first man, and Eve, the first woman, were commanded by God not to eat the fruit of one tree in the garden where he had placed them. But, tempted by the serpent, Eve ate and then gave the fruit to Adam. This episode is referred to as "man's fall." God drove Adam and Eve out of the garden to labor and die on earth and said of man that he "is become as one of us, to know good and evil." (Chapter 3)

Cain, Abel, And Seth. Cain and Abel were born, sons of Adam and Eve. Cain became jealous of Abel and slew him. He then replied to God's question that he did not know where Abel was ("Am I my brother's keeper?"). God banished Cain "to be a fugitive and a vagabond." A third son, Seth, was born to Adam and Eve. (Chapter 4)

Noah. The descendants of Adam through Seth are listed, down to Noah. In Noah's time the wickedness of man provoked God's wrath and he sent a flood to earth. But Noah "found grace in the eyes of the Lord," who told him to build an ark and enter it with his family and representatives of every living creature. For 150 days the flood raged, so that only Noah and those with him in the ark remained alive to repopulate the earth. (Chapters 6-8)

Accounts of the Patriarchs (11:28-50:26). These accounts begin with Abraham and end with Joseph.

Abraham (11:26-25:10). God called Abraham, commanding him to go to the land of Canaan and promising that out of his issue he would make "a great nation." Abraham obeyed and in Canaan erected altars to God. But later, to escape "a famine in the land," Abraham went to Egypt, where he prospered. On his return he dwelt in Hebron, again building an altar "unto the Lord." Through many trials the faith and character of Abraham were tested. One account tells how almost all of mankind were destroyed when God rained brimstone and fire upon the wicked people of the two cities, Sodom and Gomorrah. Only Abraham's nephew Lot and Lot's two daughters were spared. Afterward "God remembered Abraham," who would therefore become the father of "a multitude of nations." Sarah bore Abraham a son "in his old age," and they named him Isaac....

An Outline of the Bible. Copyright © by Benson Y. Landis. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

What People are Saying About This

Living Church
"Surpassing similar production in print, which tend either to be pious or to be critically opinionated."
Adult Leadership
"An invaluable outline...to aid any reader of the Bible."

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Outline of the Bible 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Such a thin book.... is such an invaluable source of information. The Living Church says is best, in infering that the writing is not pious or opinionated. It is quite objective and scholarly, and that lays a foundation for searching for the Truth. I have had this tethered book since 1974. It is indeed, a companion. To Landis, where ever you are in Spirit, thank you for this contribution. Rhodes Gardner (Western) Colorado, May 2000.