Outlive Your Life: You Were Made to Make A Difference

Outlive Your Life: You Were Made to Make A Difference

4.3 234
by Max Lucado
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Dear Friend,

May I share a story that is very dear to my heart?

It's a story of hillbillies and simple folk, net casters and tax collectors. A story of a movement that exploded like a just-opened fire hydrant out of Jerusalem and spilled into the ends of the earth: into the streets of Paris, the districts of Rome, and the ports of Athens, Istanbul,

…  See more details below

Overview

Dear Friend,

May I share a story that is very dear to my heart?

It's a story of hillbillies and simple folk, net casters and tax collectors. A story of a movement that exploded like a just-opened fire hydrant out of Jerusalem and spilled into the ends of the earth: into the streets of Paris, the districts of Rome, and the ports of Athens, Istanbul, Shanghai, and Buenos Aires. A story so mighty, controversial, head spinning, and life changing that two millennia later we wonder:

Might it happen again?

Heaven knows we hope so. These are devastating times: 1.75 billions people are desperately poor; one billion are hungry. Lonely hearts indwell our neighborhoods and attend our schools. In the midst of it all, here we stand: you, me, and our one-of-a-kind lives. We are given a choice ... an opportunity to make a big difference during a difficult time. What if we did? What if we rocked the world with hope?

Worth a try, don't you think?

- Max Lucado

One hundred percent of the author's royalties from Outlive Your Life products will benefit children and families through World Vision and other ministries of faith-based compassion.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Megaseller Lucado (3:16--The Numbers of Hope) celebrates his 25th year in publishing with a call to Christians to use "our one-of-a-kind lifetimes and once-in-history opportunity" to "alter the course of human suffering." With his typical folksiness, Lucado uses the first 12 chapters of the biblical book of Acts as a springboard, describing how God uses Galilean fishermen--and each of us--to change the world. Familiar biblical stories--Ananias and Sapphira, the Greek-speaking widows, Peter's dream--take on new meaning as Lucado urges Christians to look beyond their usual lives. "None of us can help everyone. But all of us can help someone. And when we help them, we serve Jesus," he writes simply. Lucado provides discussion questions for group or personal use, as well as ideas for action. The book is the lead item of a wide array of related products, including an audiobook, greeting cards, Bible, children and youth material, curriculum, and gift books. Lucado shows fans both longtime and new that he remains, after all these years, a powerful voice in the call to authentic Christianity. (Sept.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781418562489
Publisher:
Nelson, Thomas, Inc.
Publication date:
04/23/2012
Sold by:
THOMAS NELSON
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
240
Sales rank:
143,224
File size:
817 KB

Read an Excerpt

Outlive Your Life
Chapter 1
Our Once-in-History
Opportunity
By the time you knew what to call it, you were neck deep in it. You’d toddler-walked and talked, smelled crayons and swung bats, gurgled and giggled your way out of diapers and into childhood.
You’d noticed how guys aren’t gals and dogs aren’t cats and pizza sure beats spinach. And then, somewhere in the midst of it all, it hit you. At your grandpa’s funeral perhaps. Maybe when you waved good-bye as your big brother left for the marines. You realized that these days are more than ice cream trips, homework, and pimples. This is called life. And this one is yours.
Complete with summers and songs and gray skies and tears, you have a life. Didn’t request one, but you have one. A first day. A final day. And a few thousand in between. You’ve been given an honest-to-goodness human life.
You’ve been given your life. No one else has your version. You’ll never bump into yourself on the sidewalk. You’ll never meet anyone who has your exact blend of lineage, loves, and longings. Your life will never be lived by anyone else. You’re not a jacket in an attic that can be recycled after you are gone. And who pressed the accelerator? As soon as one day is lived, voilà, here comes another. The past has passed, and the good old days are exactly that: old days, the stuff of rearview mirrors and scrapbooks. Life is racing by, and if we aren’t careful, you and I will look up, and our shot at it will have passed us by.
Some people don’t bother with such thoughts. They grind through their days without lifting their eyes to look. They live and die and never ask why.
But you aren’t numbered among them, or you wouldn’t be holding a book entitled Outlive Your Life. It’s not enough for you to do well. You want to do good. You want your life to matter. You want to live in such a way that the world will be glad you did.
But how can you? How can I? Can God use us?
I have one hundred and twenty answers to that question. One hundred and twenty residents of ancient Israel. They were the charter members of the Jerusalem church (Acts 1:15). Fishermen, some. Revenue reps, others. A former streetwalker and a converted revolutionary or two. They had no clout with Caesar, no friends at the temple headquarters. Truth be told, they had nothing more than this: a fire in the belly to change the world.
Thanks to Luke we know how they fared. He recorded their stories in the book of Acts. Let’s listen to it. That’s right—listen to the book of Acts. It cracks with the sounds of God’s ever-expanding work. Press your ear against the pages, and hear God press into the corners and crevices of the world.
Hear sermons echo off the temple walls. Baptismal waters splashing, just-saved souls laughing. Hear the spoon scrape the bowl as yet another hungry mouth is fed.
Listen to the doors opening and walls collapsing. Doors to Antioch, Ethiopia, Corinth, and Rome. Doors into palaces, prisons, and Roman courts.
And walls. The ancient prejudice between Jew and Samaritan— down! The thick and spiked division between Jew and Gentile—crash!
The partitions that quarantine male from female, landowner from pauper, master from slave, black African from Mediterranean Jew—God demolishes them all.
Acts announces, “God is afoot!”
Is he still? we wonder. Would God do with us what he did with his first followers?
Heaven knows we hope so. These are devastating times: 1.75 billion people are desperately poor, 1 billion are hungry, 2 million are trafficked in slavery, and pandemic diseases are gouging entire nations. Each year nearly 2 million children are exploited in the global commercial sex trade. And in the five minutes it took you to read these pages, almost ninety children died of preventable diseases. More than half of all Africans do not have access to modern health facilities. As a result, 10 million of them die each year from diarrhea, acute respiratory illness, malaria, and measles. Many of those deaths could be prevented by one shot.
Yet in the midst of the wreckage, here we stand, the modern-day version of the Jerusalem church. You, me, and our one-of-a-kind lifetimes and once-in-history opportunity.
Ours is the wealthiest generation of Christians ever. We are bright, educated, and experienced. We can travel around the world in twenty-four hours or send a message in a millisecond. We have the most sophisticated research and medicines at the tips of our fingers. We have ample resources. A mere 2 percent of the world’s grain harvest would be enough, if shared, to erase the problems of hunger and malnutrition around the world. There is enough food on the planet to offer every person twenty-five hundred calories of sustenance a day. We have enough food to feed the hungry.
And we have enough bedrooms to house the orphans. Here’s the math. There are 145 million orphans worldwide. Nearly 236 million people in the United States call themselves Christians. From a purely statistical standpoint, American Christians by themselves have the wherewithal to house every orphan in the world.
Of course, many people are not in a position to do so. They are elderly, infirm, unemployed, or simply feel no call to adopt. Yet what if a small percentage of them did? Hmmm, let’s say 6 percent. If so, we could provide loving homes for the more than 14.1 million children in sub-Saharan Africa who have been orphaned by the AIDS epidemic. Among the noble causes of the church, how does that one sound? “American Christians Stand Up for AIDS Orphans.” Wouldn’t that headline be a welcome one?
I don’t mean to oversimplify these terribly complicated questions. We can’t just snap our fingers and expect the grain to flow across borders or governments to permit foreign adoptions. Policies stalemate the best of efforts. International relations are strained. Corrupt officials snag the systems. I get that.
But this much is clear: the storehouse is stocked. The problem is not in the supply; the problem is in the distribution. God has given this generation, our generation, everything we need to alter the course of human suffering. A few years back, three questions rocked my world. They came from different people in the span of a month. Question 1: Had you been a German Christian during World War II, would you have taken a stand against Hitler? Question 2: Had you lived in the South during the civil rights conflict, would you have taken a stand against racism? Question 3: When your grandchildren discover you lived during a day in which 1.75 billion people were poor and 1 billion were hungry, how will they judge your response? I didn’t mind the first two questions. They were hypothetical. I’d like to think I would have taken a stand against Hitler and fought against racism. But those days are gone, and those choices were not mine. But the third question has kept me awake at night. I do live today; so do you. We are given a choice . . . an opportunity to make a big difference during a difficult time. What if we did? What if we rocked the world with hope? Infiltrated all corners with God’s love and life? What if we followed the example of the Jerusalem church? This tiny sect expanded into a world-changing force. We still drink from their wells and eat from their trees of faith. How did they do it? What can we learn from their priorities and passion?
Let’s ponder their stories, found in the first twelve chapters of Acts. Let’s examine each event through the lens of this prayer: Do it again, Jesus. Do it again. After all, “We are God’s masterpiece. He has created us anew in Christ Jesus, so we can do the good things he planned for us long ago” (Eph. 2:10 NLT). We are created by a great God to do great works. He invites us to outlive our lives, not just in heaven but here on earth.
Here’s a salute to a long life: goodness that outlives the grave, love that outlasts the final breath. May you live in such a way that your death is just the beginning of your life.
After David had done the will of God in his own generation, he died and was buried. (Acts 13:36 NLT)
O Lord, what an amazing opportunity you have spread out before me—a chance to make a difference for you in a desperately hurting world. Help me to see the needs you want me to see, to react in a way that honors you, and to bless others by serving them gladly with practical expressions of your love. Help me be Jesus’ hands and feet, and through your Spirit give me the strength and wisdom I need to fulfill your plan for me in my own generation. In Jesus’ name I pray, amen.

Read More

What People are saying about this

Ron Hall
A powerful collection of stories and Biblical truths that will keep you awake long after you read it, wondering and hopefully scheming how to outlive your life. --(Ron Hall, bestselling author of Same Kind Of Different As Me)
Richard Stearns
This may well be Max Lucado's most important book. On your 99th birthday what will you cherish when you look back at your life? Will it be the size of your bank accounts, the extent of your real estate holdings, or the impressive titles you've held -- or -- will it be the people you've loved, the relationships in which you've invested, and the things you've done for God's Kingdom? Outlive Your Life is a roadmap for your life journey that will leave you few regrets and will inspire you to be all that God intended. This is one of those rare books that can change your life. --(Richard Stearns, President of World Vision US, author of The Hole in Our Gospel)
Michael W. Smith
There has never been a better time for Believers to show God’s love, to sing His love to the nations. Thanks, Max, for reminding us that we each are designed to make a difference. Your words bring hope to all who read them and help to those in need.--(Michael W. Smith, bestselling Christian music artist)
Denver Moore
Pastor Max tells all folks how to move from Bible studies to Bible doins. Denver Moore, bestselling author of Same Kind Of Different As Me
Kathy Lee Gifford
Max is a writer who disguises his genius well—he makes the most profound truth understandable to people like me. And then something miraculous happens. This truth changes your heart and ultimately, somebody else’s world.--(Kathie Lee Gifford, co-host of NBC’s The Today Show)
Wess Stafford
Unlike any other time in history, believers are acutely aware of the plight of the world's poor--though most feel overwhelmed by poverty and feel powerless to do anything about it. Yet God made it clear in His Word that we are to care for "the least of these,” leaving us without excuse. Max Lucado has passionately discipled a generation in how to live out our faith. Now, in Outlive Your Life: You Were Made to Make a Difference, he teaches us to live compassionately in our hurting world, and reveals why God deliberately chooses to use ordinary people like you and me to carry out His mandate. What might happen if Christ-followers worldwide decided to put aside differences and work together to end global poverty? Rarely have I read a book that so echoes the cry of my own heart. Outlive Your Life will compel you to live in such a way that your legacy will impact the world beyond your lifetime.--(Wess Stafford, President and CEO, Compassion International)
Toby Mac
With Outlive Your Life Max Lucado continues to add to his already amazing legacy. Once again Max helps reveal the heart of God in such an impactful way. You will be challenged and motivated.--(Toby Mac, Grammy Award winning Recording Artist)

Read More

Meet the Author

More than 120 million readers have found inspiration and encouragement in the writings of Max Lucado. He lives with his wife, Denalyn, and their mischievous mutt, Andy, in San Antonio, Texas, where he serves the people of Oak Hills Church.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Outlive Your Life 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 234 reviews.
Ginfinluno More than 1 year ago
I've read several books about giving and helping others so I was hesitant at yet ANOTHER book about the same thing... but I was surprised at how much I enjoyed Outlive Your Life. Max talks often about how ordinary people are the ones who change the world. If I could pick a theme of the book it's one line from the first third, 'God does not call the qualified, he qualifies the called.' It sums up the book perfectly and it's equally as motivating. I especially love that there is a study guide in the back of the book, which is perfect for small groups, Bible Studies, etc... I would have loved to have read this book with a group and then jointly picked a project at the end to put some action with the thoughts. I receommend this book to anyone.
terdsie More than 1 year ago
Max Lucado Thomas Nelson Publishing We are common folk. We sit in the bleachers, eat at diners, change diapers, and wear our favorite team's ball cap. Fan's don't wave when we pass. Servants don't scurry when we come home. Chauffeurs don't drive our cars; butlers don't open our doors or draw our baths. Doormen don't greet us, and security doesn't protect us. We are regular folk. And we wonder: does God use people like us. He did. God stampeded the first-century society with swaybacks, not thoroughbreds. Are you more dinghy than cruise ship? More stand-in than movie star? More blue jeans than blue blood? Congratulations. God changes the world with folks just like you. This is the second Max Lucado book that I have read and I have to say that it is an incredible book. Lucado delves into a subject that, upon reflection, lay deep within the heart of every person: Living a life that matters. Moving effortlessly through the first few chapters of Acts, Lucado shows us how God used the very people that society discounted, as the catalyst to change the world. These men and women of God were nothing to the culture that they lived in: a tax collector, a prostitute, a bunch of fishermen -- yet they were pivotal in spreading the Gospel of Christ and shaping history. I actually read this entire book in a day. Once you breach the first chapter, Max draws you in and points you toward challenge after challenge, daring you to deepen your relationship with Christ and, in so doing, broadening the ministry that He has placed you in. Don't misunderstand, you are eyeball-deep in a ministry whether you realize it or not. Your ministry is to be Christ to people around you - even when you can't stand to be around them. Max weaves personal anecdotes between scripture and stories of real-life people who simply trusted God to use them, and the incredible outcomes of that simple trust. Lucado's unique writing style, mixed with his honest perspective on life, creates a book that encourages as it challenges, and uplifts as it subtly chastens. I found I had to ask myself several times why I knew what Lucado was saying, but I wasn't acting on it. Outlive Your Life is a call to all Christians to walk what we say we believe. To move like we say we do. To be what we say we are -- Followers of Christ. I encourage everyone that wants to live their Christian life to the fullest to get this book, as well as Lucado's Fearless, and read them one after the other. You will walk away with a new understanding of God's will for you, I can promise you that. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."
The_Observer More than 1 year ago
It has been a while since I have read any of Max Lucado's books besides those of his that were written when his daughters were still little, the only exception being his Devotional NCV Bible (which rocks). Nevertheless, I was glad to see that he did not change his style much. Same great truths spelled out in simple words, but that simplicity only makes the point stronger instead of diminishing it. That is one of the reasons why I usually recommend Max Lucado's books to those, for whom English is not the native language, yet who wants to learn. Besides being easy to read, Max has a gift from God to inspire people to action. You read and find yourself wanting to not simply read the book, but do what it talks about. This particular book, Outlive Your Life, talks about the fact that while our life here is not all we've got and that the best is coming soon, we nonetheless should not abandon what we have been given in this life, but use it for the good of others. Everyone got something - don't just bury that one talent in the ground and wait for the Master to return so you can give His talent back to Him. NO! Use it here, use it now - for that's the reason you were given that talent in the first place. It's a good book for both young adults who are just starting to wonder "What on earth am I doing here?" as well as older people who are looking for more purpose in their lives.
PGardnerNZ More than 1 year ago
Out Live Your Life by Max Lucado Max Lucado takes us through the the first twelve chapters of the book of Acts and forces us to address issues around poverty and social justice. The very issues we find it so easy to tune out to and put on the back burner. Using carefully crafted stories Lucado highlights where each of us can help. Especially pleasing was his acknowledgment that we ordinary people can sometimes do only ordinary and small things to help. My favorite quote from this book is: As Chrysostom pointed out, "We do not hear, 'I was sick and you healed me,' or 'I was in prison and you liberated me.'" The works of mercy are simple deeds. And yet in these simple deeds, we serve Jesus. In a review of this book Kyle Mcdanell says it is all social and no gospel and states: Although I believe that Lucado understands the gospel, I believe he has dropped the ball on this one. Outlive Your Life: You Were Made to Make A Difference is a book, surveying the biblical book Acts of the Apostles in the New Testament, about why the church should seek to alleviate poverty and fight against injustice. Again, I believe that the church should seek to do such things, but in this book Lucado presents almost all social and no gospel. Little is said about the cross or resurrection. Little is said about belief in the works of Christ and repentance of our sins. If we hand someone a cup of cold water for any other motivation than to present the gospel and to show the love of Christ, then we have missed the point. I wholeheartedly agree AND disagree with Mcdanell on this. I agree that our motivation should be to present the gospel and show the love of Christ. But I disagree that Lucado doesn't say this himself. In actual fact the book's 3rd chapter, entitled Don't Forget the Bread is all about this and Lucado says in it (referring to Peter's sermon at Pentecost): Peter would eventually speak about poverty. The church would soon address the issues of widows, disease, and bigotry. But not yet. The first order of the church's first sermon was this: pardon for all our sins. Peter delivered the bread. Personally I think this is one of Lucado's best books for quite some time. Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze[tags]BookSneeze[/tags].com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."
joannacullen More than 1 year ago
I've read a handful of Max Lucado's books and he's written countless others. While they are charming and often inspirational, even after reading only a fraction of his library, I find that I am tired of his style. It's certainly cute and humorous, and yes, it garners a few chuckles and presents the occasional thought-provoking concept, but it's pretty formulaic. There'd been a rather significant amount of buzz surrounding the release of his latest book - Outlive Your Life - so I went into it hoping for something more than the usual fare. Unfortunately, that isn't what I found. Outlive Your Life is full of the same homespun stories aimed at making Bible characters relate-able to us in the 21st Century, and anecdotal stories about famous and semi-famous figures. Lucado tries to show us the importance of doing something with our lives - of making a real difference - but failed to inspire me with his stale prose and quirky storytelling. Maybe Outlive Your Life will be a home run for extreme Lucado fans. If you don't mind a cookie cutter mold fit with a slightly different filling, then this is probably the book for you. But, if you were expecting something different from Lucado, this is not it. It's okay, Max...we know you mean well. Maybe next time?
Stevenkat27 More than 1 year ago
We are common folk. We sit in the bleachers, eat at diners, change diapers, and wear our favorite team's ball cap. Fan's don't wave when we pass. Servants don't scurry when we come home. Chauffer's don't drive our cars; butlers don't open our doors or draw our baths. Doormen don't greet us, and security doesn't protect us. We are regular folk. And we wonder: Does God use people like us? He did. God stampeded the first-century society with swaybacks, not thoroughbreds. Before Jesus came along, the disciples were loading trucks, coaching soccer, and selling Slupee drinks at the convenience store. Their collars were blue, and their hands were calloused, and there is no evidence that Jesus chose them because they were smarter or nicer than the guy next door. The one thing they had going for them was a willingness to take a step when Jesus said, "Follow me." Are you more dinghy than cruise ship? More stand-in than movie star? More blue jeans than blue blood? Congratulations. God changes the world with folks like you. (Excerpt back cover). In the book, Out Live Your Life by Max Lucado, he takes each of us through the first couple of chapters in Acts to show us how our lives are very similar to the people in each of the chapters and the differences they made and how we can do the very same things. We simply need one thing. A willingness to do it. That's it. We need more yes's and a lot less no's! Max in his usual way of writing directly from the heart and as a close, personal friend touches your heart and shows you the different ways we can all begin to take care of people around us. He provides perfect examples of everyday people who made less than $1.25 a day and they too are changing lives. So what's our excuse? Find out by reading Max's latest book! I received this book, compliments of Thomas Nelson Publishers for my honest review and believe every single person living today should read this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I take off mypants revailing my underwear. In it, my big black di<_>ck gets bigger.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He watches anxiously.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
ruthhill74 More than 1 year ago
I have to admit that at the beginning of this book, I wasn't too excited. I have read my share of Max Lucado books. He often has great devotional insight, but I figured I had heard it all before. As I read, I discovered that this book was different. I got into the meat of the book, and I realized that the premise of his book was to live the gospel we preach in tangible ways. You can tell a hungry child all you want that Jesus loves you, but what will that mean to him or her without giving a hearty meal to the child in need? We tend to get so caught up in our own lives that we just don't slow down enough to put into practice what we profess to believe. One of the messages that really touched me was when the Apostle Paul was brought up. We know that he was the chief persecutor of Christians, and then Jesus met him and changed his life forever. Lucado pointed out that even those we think are far gone and seem like they will never turn to the Lord should not be the ones that we abandon and say they will never change. We have to keep praying. In fact, as Lucado points out in another chapter, we should pray first, not last. This would be a fantastic book use in a small group Bible study or devotional time. There is a discussion guide in the back of the book. But if you are not willing to put action behind what you are learning, you and your group would be wasting your time. One person can make a difference. If everyone on earth believed that he or she could not make a difference, nothing would ever change. He challenges us to be like Mother Theresa who, though dead, still lives on through her tremendous work with the orphans of Calcutta.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
humbled66 More than 1 year ago
As with all of Mr. Lucado's books it has good spirtual insite and give you lots to ponder on about your life and how you choose to live it. He grabs you by the heart and makes you think about what you have contributed to it and what you have done for others. It is a real eye opener.
jaaneyb53 More than 1 year ago
This is an engaging and fast paced study that really gets you thinking. Very enjoyable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm not a big read, but in October, I read Outlive Your Life by Max Lucado after recommendations from several friends. This is a good read but not exactly what I expected.To help propel my reading, I challenged my husband. ¿I¿ll finish my book before you finish yours! Ready¿GO!¿ It helped, more than a little! The flow of the book parallels the book of Acts in its flow and sequence. The author takes different passages and uses them to set up the different chapters in the book. To me, it felt more like short snippets than it did one book that flowed well from chapter to chapter. All of Lucado¿s points were great, but it just wasn¿t my favorite read. The author had a lot of good things to say, and I was challenged throughout the book. However, I expected to walk away with a big broad idea of how to outlive my life through my legacy. Instead, I walked away with a number of little things I can do, day by day, to make an impact.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
HarmoniousGlow More than 1 year ago
Summary: In "Outlive Your Life," Max Lucado attempts to show the reader how he or she can make a difference in this world - through prayer, through love, through small actions, through breaking down walls and seeing people rather than judging people. He ends with the passage about seeing Jesus in other - helping Jesus when we feed the hungry and take care of the sick. Review: Unfortunately, I did not get much out of this book. As much as I love Max Lucado, this book came across as another "missionary" book - that is, be a missionary by recognizing and meeting the needs of those around you. Witness through action. Show Christ's love to others. That's all right and true, but its also been written about before and really didn't leave me with anything I didn't already know, nor did it really give me any solid way to make a difference. I'm also left wondering about the other side of making a difference. What about preaching? What about standing up for what you believe in? What about fighting for the moral truths we find in the Bible? I feel like there is so much more that Lucado could have covered in this book. On the bright side, it's a very fast, very easy read. Rating: 2/5 Stars * Disclaimer: I received this book for free from in exchange for my honest review of it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago