Over in the Meadow : A Traditional Counting Rhyme

Over in the Meadow : A Traditional Counting Rhyme

by Jan Thornhill, Olive A. Wadsworth, Olive A. Wadsworth
     
 


Jan Thornhill's trademark ingenuity brings this well-loved 19th century rhyme to a new audience in a captivating and original way.
Jan has created a magical imaginary world made up of everyday objects: A forest of broccoli, a beaver dam of pretzels, a dragonfly with paperclip wings... Who could have thought berries, twist-ties, light bulbs, garden gloves,…  See more details below

Overview


Jan Thornhill's trademark ingenuity brings this well-loved 19th century rhyme to a new audience in a captivating and original way.
Jan has created a magical imaginary world made up of everyday objects: A forest of broccoli, a beaver dam of pretzels, a dragonfly with paperclip wings... Who could have thought berries, twist-ties, light bulbs, garden gloves, and rubber bands could be transformed into such unimagined delights?
As always with Jan Thornhill's books, young readers can pore for hours over the intricacies of a seemingly simple story. Not only will they learn about counting, rhyming, animals, and nature, but kids will also delight in picking out recognizable everyday objects used in ingenious new ways in the illustrations on these pages. Pages at the back of the book show the original elements used in the creation of the illustrations—readers can then go back and play eye-spy.
Hand-drawn text with some rebus elements help the youngest reader to learn and delight in words. Ten spreads show different parts of the meadow and introduce a different animal and a new action verb.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Ingrid Masak Mida

“Over in the meadow in the sand in the sun,/Lived an old mother turtle and her little turtle one.” So begins this traditional 19th-century counting rhyme, which introduces young children to 10 animal babies and their mothers over the course of a day. Jan Thornhill, who has won several international book awards for her richly illustrated picture books, has revived the rhyme in her latest book, adding an innovative visual twist.

            In Thornhill’s version, common household items, such as rubber bands, cotton balls, socks, pretzels, leaves, and broccoli, were photographed and layered into highly textured computer-generated images. In one spread, baby owls – created from fuzzy slippers, toy wheels, carrots, and photos of eyes cut from magazines – next in a tree made of pecans and rubber bands. The mother owl – made of yellow and brown leaves, carrots, toy wheels, garlic cloves, and magazine eyes – hovers nearby in a forest made of green leaves and grasses. Each spread is packed full of brightly coloured detail and wrapped with a vibrant border. The hand-drawn multi-coloured text is set off in a colourful bubble.

            Thornhill’s whimsical collages are bold and contemporary in style, unlike the elegant illustrations of her previous books such as The Rumor. Adults and children alike will be fascinated by the challenge of figuring out what the images are made of. A handy index at the back of the book lists the elements used in their creation. Thornhill’s highly original method of illustration has transformed this old rhyme into a fresh visual feast.


QUILL & QUIRE, a Toronto writer and artist

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781897066089
Publisher:
Owlkids Books
Publication date:
09/09/2004
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.78(w) x 11.26(h) x 0.39(d)
Age Range:
3 - 8 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >