Over the Moon: An Adoption Tale

( 4 )

Overview

An affirming story about international adoption, based on the author's own experience with her daughter.

A magical, reassuring story of one adoptive family's beginnings, told in words and pictures that are just right for the youngest child.

A loving couple dream of a baby born far away and know that this is the baby they have been waiting to adopt.

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Overview

An affirming story about international adoption, based on the author's own experience with her daughter.

A magical, reassuring story of one adoptive family's beginnings, told in words and pictures that are just right for the youngest child.

A loving couple dream of a baby born far away and know that this is the baby they have been waiting to adopt.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Both text and pictures are suffused with anticipation and joyful welcome at the baby's arrival." --Kirkus Reviews, pointer

"An ebullient tribute for families whose members may have come from a faraway place." --Publishers Weekly

"Katz's exuberance is contagious, bursting forth to make this as sunny as a warm summer day." --Booklist

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
There is a contagious exuberance to newcomer Katz's playfully stylized collage, gouache and colored pencil illustrations, which display a vibrant palette and all the energy of a flamenco dance. The story, too, has a joyous ring, as it follows a couple's airplane trip "over the moon and through the night" to a "faraway place" where they adopt a baby girl. The story has ample measures of fantasy (on the night their baby is born, the soon-to-be mom and dad each dream of the baby they had been "longing for") and lyricism (lying on a blanket watching the stars, the couple tell the baby, "You grew like a flower in another lady's tummy until you were born"). The artwork accentuates the joy that bursts from the parents-to-be: when the happy phone call comes saying the baby has been born, they float above the town like Chagall characters. With its poetic flair and fanciful art, Katz's treatment is an interesting contrast to Allen Say's Allison (see review below), which presents the adoption issue from a more forthright perspective. Inspired by the author's own daughter, who was adopted from Central America, this is an ebullient tribute for families whose members may have come from a faraway place. Ages 2-8. (Sept.)
From The Critics
This is an outstanding book for young children about international adoption. The text is joyful and reassuring, but the real delight is the illustrations which are colorful quilted folk art designs. My adopted daughter loved the book because she could read it herself. We both were fascinated by the illustrations and enjoyed going through the book over and over again to look for more things embedded in the pictures. 2001, Henry Holt and Company, $6.95. Ages 3 to 8. Reviewer: S. Latson SOURCE: Parent Council Volume 8
Children's Literature - Jeanne K. Pettenati
This colorful adoption tale illustrates the journey traveled by adoptive parents to meet their daughter and become a family. The journey begins when a baby is born and her parents dream about her before they actually meet her. The book depicts the sheer joy and the intensity of love these parents feel when finally united with their long awaited child. The book's message is that adoption is a wonderful and permanent way to create a family. "Forever and always we will be your mommy and daddy. Forever and always you will be our child," the baby's parents tell her. The bright illustrations, characterized by magical realism, are reminiscent of an island adventure. This tale is an appealing choice for adoption libraries.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1Bright, fanciful folk-art illustrations set the mood for (but occasionally get in the way of) this loving story of adoption. The smoothly flowing text is reassuring throughout, reflecting the joy of the new parents and ending with the "forever and always" that is the promise of adoption. The foster parents ("the kind people who had taken care of her") are pictured. The first day includes the first telling of the adoption story to the baby girl, "You grew like a flower in another lady's tummy." However, the first couple of illustrations are problematic. On the first spread, a baby is shown alone on a hillside sitting on a beanbag cloud with a city in the distance. The text states: "Once upon a time a teeny-tiny baby was born." Babies aren't born alone on hillsides, and even though this one is smiling, the picture doesn't seem reassuring. Adopted children need to know that they were born like other children, and did not appear magically without human connection. Also, though the text realistically recounts the new parents' first-day nervousness, the baby is pictured as smiling throughout instead of showing a range of reactions to different activities and situations.Nancy Schimmel, formerly at San Mateo County Library, CA
Kirkus Reviews
A happy, colorful book about a man and woman dreaming of their soon-to-be-born adopted baby, receiving the news of her birth, and flying to the "faraway place" where they meet their child. Based on Katz's experience adopting a Central American infant and bright with mixed-media illustrations suggestive of folk art, this is a book for adults to use with children who were adopted in similar circumstances. The message is reassuring: "Forever and always we will be your mommy and daddy. Forever and always you will be our child." The birth mother is gently described as another lady in whose tummy "you grew like a flower," but who "wasn't able to take care of you, so Mommy and Daddy came to adopt you and bring you home." The baby has dark hair like the mother's and dark eyes like both parents' but with duskier skin than either. As in Jamie Lee Curtis and Laura Cornell's Tell Me Again About the Night I Was Born (1996), both text and pictures are suffused with anticipation and joyful welcome at the baby's arrival.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780805067071
  • Publisher: Square Fish
  • Publication date: 7/28/2001
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 130,326
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.83 (w) x 7.69 (h) x 0.09 (d)

Meet the Author

Karen Katz

Karen Katz has written and illustrated many books for children, including The Colors of Us, Can You Say Peace, My First Ramadan, Counting Kisses and Where is Baby’s Belly Button. Long inspired by folk art from around the world, she was inspired to write Over the Moon, her first book, when she and her husband adopted their daughter from Guatemala, and she wanted to tell the story of welcoming Lena into their lives. Katz loves to paint and experiment with texture, color, collage and pattern. Besides an author and illustrator, she has been a costume designer, quilt maker, fabric artist and graphic designer. Katz and her family divide their time between New York City and Saugerties, New York.

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    1. Education:
      Tyler School of Art, Philadelphia; Yale Graduate School of Art and Architecture
    2. Website:

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 4 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Over the Moon

    One of my children's favorite adoption stories. They love to reread this, ask questions and make comparisons with their own adoption stories. The author explains "waiting for the baby," "the call," and does a great job of introducing the birthmother into the discussion. Beautiful illustrations. Nice addition to the family library and to explain international adoption to other children.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2007

    Described our experience perfectly

    I searched everywhere for an adoption story that fit our experience and this one did. There are so many wonderful stories of adoption out there, but you have to find the one that describes your journey. This story did it for us in a simple and beautiful way. The pictures and colors are delightful. I have trouble reading through it without getting teary and remembering our trip to get our daughter. Thank you for this very special story.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2006

    LOVE IT!

    I bought this book for my 5-year old daughter..she LOVES it. I add her name and make it her story. The illustrations are a delight and the story so true..this could have been our tale of adoption

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

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