Overcoming School Anxiety: How to Help Your Child Deal with Separation, Tests, Homework, Bullies, Math Phobia, and Other Worries [NOOK Book]

Overview

Every year, more than 68 million students of every age find themselves worrying excessively about their first day of school, even before it begins. Their hearts race, their stomachs turn, and their palms sweat just thinking about getting on the school bus for the first time, that first pop quiz, or that notoriously strict teacher. For parents of these children, nothing can be more upsetting than dropping their kids off on the first day of school, wondering how they will cope. Now, they can stop worrying and start...
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Overcoming School Anxiety: How to Help Your Child Deal with Separation, Tests, Homework, Bullies, Math Phobia, and Other Worries

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Overview

Every year, more than 68 million students of every age find themselves worrying excessively about their first day of school, even before it begins. Their hearts race, their stomachs turn, and their palms sweat just thinking about getting on the school bus for the first time, that first pop quiz, or that notoriously strict teacher. For parents of these children, nothing can be more upsetting than dropping their kids off on the first day of school, wondering how they will cope. Now, they can stop worrying and start helping. As a seasoned psychotherapist, Diane Peters Mayer has successfully treated hundreds of elementary school students suffering from this common disorder. In Overcoming School Anxiety, she shows parents how to deal with a wide variety of problems, from test and homework anxiety, to bullying, and fear of speaking up in class. Mayer also offers easy-to-learn techniques for children including breathing and relaxation exercises, focusing techniques, and tips on proper diet and exercise that help relieve stress. Filled with real-life examples as well as proven advice for working with teachers, principals, and counselors, this is the only comprehensive guide that will enable every parent to help a child cope, build confidence, and succeed in school.
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal

In her latest book, psychotherapist Mayer (The Everything Health Guide to Controlling Anxiety) addresses the myriad sources of school-related anxiety. She explains the symptoms, causes, effects, and treatments for separation anxiety, school refusal, panic disorders, phobias, homework anxiety, test anxiety, perfectionism, and bullying. She discusses how life issues such as low self-esteem, family conflict, or physical and emotional challenges can exacerbate school anxiety. Belly (diaphragmatic) breathing, mindfulness, and facing fears are the major techniques delineated to overcome these problems. Parents should learn the exercises and then guide the child through them in daily practice. A School Anxiety Scale helps children rate their anxiety level. The impact of nutrition and exercise are briefly outlined. Descriptions of therapies, medicines, and alternative treatments complete the book. Because so many topics are mentioned, this is not a conclusive resource, but it complements books like Aureen Pinto Wagner's Worried No More. For parents whose children are emotionally and physically sick about school, this book will help them examine the problem and introduce solutions. Recommended for public libraries.
—Janet Clapp

From the Publisher

"Its [Overcoming School Anxiety] sensible deconstruction of anxiety's causes will help many parents who find t at their child's stress levels impede optimal school performance." ForeWord magazine

"Remarkably well written, and with the average parent in mind comprising her primary readership, Diane Peters Mayer presents a superb 'primer' concerning an oft described (but usually poorly interpreted) familiar topic of general interest to many (if not all ?) parents." --Metapsychology Online Reviews

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780814412886
  • Publisher: AMACOM
  • Publication date: 7/2/2008
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: 1
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 193,827
  • File size: 445 KB

Meet the Author

Diane Peters Mayer, MSW (Doylestown, PA), has been a psychotherapist in private practice for more than 18 years. She specializes in working with children and adults who have anxiety attacks, school anxiety, and panic attacks.
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Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

What Is School Anxiety?

Everyone experiences anxiety. And many adults and chil-dren experience quite a bit of stress in their daily lives that can lead to more anxiety. There are many causes of school anxiety, and children who have it may feel stressed out and unhappy five days a week, nine months out of the year.

Chuck, a fifth grader, has severe test anxiety that has been building for days about an upcoming social studies test. As soon as he gets out of bed on the morning of the test, he begins to think about it, which causes his stomach to knot, his breathing to become shallow, and his heart to pound. By the time Chuck sits down to breakfast, his head is aching and he says he feels sick and wants to stay home.

Mika, in third grade, is being bullied and ostracized by a popular group of girls whom she would like to be part of. They are nice to her one day, but either don't talk to her or make fun of her the next. Not knowing how this group will treat her from day to day has Mika anxious almost all of the time. Every morning is a fight just to get her out of bed and to the school bus on time, leaving Mika and her parents exhausted.

Children who are stressed about school on a daily basis become anxious. They have to contend with the physical and mental manifestations of anxiety, which are uncomfortable, even distressing at times. In this chapter you will learn how and why anxiety begins, what the symptoms of anxiety are, the effects of school anxiety, and how to begin to help your child.

Is Anxiety Always a Bad Thing?

Anxiety is a normal aspect of life and of being human, and it has a positive side to it, too. In order to have a zest for life, to go after dreams, to be mentally alert, and to achieve goals, anxiety is one of the driving forces that can help. Although that adrenaline rush is necessary to reach one's personal best, anxiety needs to be channeled for positive use.

Conrad, in sixth grade, has been playing the cello since third grade. He is talented, loves to practice, and is one of the soloists in his school orchestra. Starting a day or two before each concert, his stomach tightens up whenever he thinks about playing. A few hours before the concert, he feels jumpy and is unable to relax. He rehearses his solo over and over again in his mind. Minutes before his solo, stress hormones course through his body, his breathing becomes rapid, and all his senses are heightened. But instead of causing him to fall apart with anxiety, these physical changes sharpen his abilities, and he plays his part perfectly and with intense feeling. The audience goes wild after he finishes.

Every performer, every person who wants to reach optimal performance, must learn how to take control of anxiety instead of being controlled by it, and use it in a positive way to enhance his or her life. Anxiety is also a motivator for making necessary life changes. For example, if your sixth-grade child underachieves because she doesn't feel like putting out an effort, but begins to worry about not making the grade in middle school, then her anxiety can jump-start her into becoming a good student.

Anxiety is also a normal response to life situations, such as experiencing the death of a loved one, having an illness, experiencing parental divorce, starting at a new school, taking a test, or getting the lead in the school play, which all create normal levels of anxiety and response.

Anxiety Differs from Fear

The words fear and anxiety are often used interchangeably, but they have different meanings. Fear is something external, specific, and definable. For example, if your child is waiting at the school bus stop and a car veers in her direction, her brain will instantly signal to her body, "Danger!" In a split second, her brain sends messages to her legs to jump out of the way to safety. The fear of being hurt by the car can be explained in specific terms. If you ask her, she'll say she was afraid and reacted by jumping out of the way.

Anxiety, on the other hand, is nonspecific; it's intangible in nature. There is no real bodily danger. For example, if your child is afraid to leave home to go to school, and you question why, he may not be able to give you a concrete answer, because anxious feelings are often hard to define. Maybe he fears something will happen to you when he is gone, or you will forget to pick him up at the bus stop, even though that has never happened. The "what-ifs"—the intense worry about the possibility that those things might happen—are what cause anxiety, making it very difficult for him to separate from you even for a few hours.

What Happens When Anxiety Turns Negative?

Anxiety becomes a problem when it causes emotional pain and suffering and disrupts your child's ability to function well at school and in daily life. When anxiety becomes that severe and chronic it is called a disorder. If your child has severe school anxiety, she will be limited in every area of development in her life because of the intensity of the feelings and symptoms. Anxiety disorders affect over 20 million adults, adolescents, and children in the United States, making it the number one mental health issue. Americans spend billions of dollars annually trying to alleviate anxious suffering by traditional and alternative modes of treatment.

Over 6 million school-age children suffer from school anxiety, trying to cope with physical and mental symptoms that are upsetting, even terrifying, at times.

What Is Anxiety?

Anxiety is defined as a state of intense agitation, foreboding, tension, and dread, occurring from a real or perceived threat of impending danger. The experience of anxiety is unique for each person, but it does have general physical and emotional characteristics.

It is important to note that the physical and mental symptoms of anxiety such as rapid heartbeat, stomachaches, and headaches are also found in many other medical conditions, like heart problems. If you, your child, or anyone in your family experiences persistent physical complaints, don't assume the cause is stress related but have the person checked by your family physician immediately.

Anxiety is a mind-body reaction that occurs instantaneously, and its effects are felt physiologically, behaviorally, and psychologically all at the same time. There are dozens of symptoms of anxiety that range from mild, such as having butterflies before answering a question in class, to severe, such as blanking out or having a panic attack when called to the board to solve a problem. It is important for you to be familiar with the symptoms of anxiety so you can explain to your child what is happening to him when he gets anxious. For example, if your child understands that the intense adrenaline rush he feels when anxiety hits cannot harm him, it may prevent his anxiety from spiraling out of control into a panic attack—instead he could learn to say to himself, "I know this is just a chemical in my body that is making me feel bad, but it can't really hurt me." Physical symptoms include the following:

• Shallow breathing and hyperventilation

• Intense rush of adrenaline and other stress hormones

• Pounding heartbeat, heart palpitations, and sweating

• Shaky limbs and trembling

• Body and muscle tension

• Dry mouth

• Headaches

• Nausea, diarrhea, and/or vomiting

Other physical manifestations of anxiety include skin eruptions, hives and rashes, fatigue, and eating and sleeping problems. The mental and emotional symptoms are equally distressing and include feeling overwhelmed, loss of concentration, feeling out of control, helplessness, hopelessness, anger, and shame. Behaviors in your child to watch for include acting-out behaviors such as angry outbursts and tantrums; refusal to go to school or to do homework; crying; inability to sleep; curtailment of activities; and avoidance of social situations, places, and certain people.

What Is School Anxiety?

School anxiety is being used as a broad term in this book. It refers, in part, to the problems from home that children bring to school including having an anxiety disorder; being learning disabled; or dealing with family issues, such as divorce or childhood trauma. However, the school environment can be a problematic place, too, with its emphasis on evaluation, achievement, and testing. Other factors might include peer pressure, being bullied, or not getting along with a teacher. This book will cover the myriad causes of school anxiety.

The Short- and Long-Term Effects of School Anxiety

Children with severe school anxiety are unlikely to outgrow it. However, the ways that anxiety manifests its effects can be damaging, making intervention and treatment essential to a child's health and well-being. Short-term effects of school anxiety include the following:

• Missing out on important schoolwork if frequent absences or school refusal occur, stunting intellectual development and creating a record of poor academic performance

• Not being able to relate well to peer group reduces social growth

• Potential increase in frustration levels, stress, and tension among family members

Long-term effects of school anxiety can include chronic anxiety or the development of an anxiety disorder, chronic underachievement in school, low self-esteem, and difficulties in achieving a satisfying personal and professional adulthood.

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Table of Contents

Contents

Foreword by Deirdre Shaffer....................xv
Preface....................xvii
Acknowledgments....................xix
How to Use the Overcoming School Anxiety Program....................xxi
CHAPTER 1 What Is School Anxiety?....................1
CHAPTER 2 Anxiety Is a Mind-Body Experience....................10
CHAPTER 3 Help! My Child Won't Go to School....................20
CHAPTER 4 My Child Can't Stop Worrying....................31
CHAPTER 5 My Child Panics and Avoids Situations....................42
CHAPTER 6 My Child Fears People, Places, and Things....................55
CHAPTER 7 My Child Has Homework Anxiety....................67
CHAPTER 8 My Child Has Test Anxiety....................77
CHAPTER 9 My Child Is a Perfectionist....................88
CHAPTER 10 Building Your Child's Self-Esteem....................100
CHAPTER 11 My Child Is Being Bullied....................112
CHAPTER 12 Parental and Family Conflict and Issues....................123
CHAPTER 13 My Child Has Learning, Physical, or Emotional Challenges....................135
CHAPTER 14 Learn to Breathe to Feel at Ease....................147
CHAPTER 15 "Be Present" for School Success....................159
CHAPTER 16 Learning to Let Go and Flow....................169
CHAPTER 17 Eat Right to Feel Right....................180
CHAPTER 18 Getting Physical with Your Child....................191
CHAPTER 19 What Are Traditional Medical Treatments for Children?....................201
CHAPTER 20 What Are Alternative Treatments for Children?....................211
Wrap-Up....................221
Resources....................223
Index....................225
About the Author....................233
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First Chapter

OVERCOMING SCHOOL ANXIETY

How to Help Your Child Deal with Separation, Tests, Homework, Bullies, Math Phobia, and Other Worries
By DIANE PETERS MAYER

AMACOM

Copyright © 2008 Diane Peters Mayer
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-0-8144-1288-6


Chapter One

What Is School Anxiety?

* * *

Everyone experiences anxiety. And many adults and children experience quite a bit of stress in their daily lives that can lead to more anxiety. There are many causes of school anxiety, and children who have it may feel stressed out and unhappy five days a week, nine months out of the year.

Chuck, a fifth grader, has severe test anxiety that has been building for days about an upcoming social studies test. As soon as he gets out of bed on the morning of the test, he begins to think about it, which causes his stomach to knot, his breathing to become shallow, and his heart to pound. By the time Chuck sits down to breakfast, his head is aching and he says he feels sick and wants to stay home.

Mika, in third grade, is being bullied and ostracized by a popular group of girls whom she would like to be part of. They are nice to her one day, but either don't talk to her or make fun of her the next. Not knowing how this group will treat her from day to day has Mika anxious almost all of the time. Every morning is a fight just to get her out of bed and to the school bus on time, leaving Mika and her parents exhausted.

Children who are stressed about school on a daily basis become anxious. They have to contend with the physical and mental manifestations of anxiety, which are uncomfortable, even distressing at times. In this chapter you will learn how and why anxiety begins, what the symptoms of anxiety are, the effects of school anxiety, and how to begin to help your child.

Is Anxiety Always a Bad Thing?

Anxiety is a normal aspect of life and of being human, and it has a positive side to it, too. In order to have a zest for life, to go after dreams, to be mentally alert, and to achieve goals, anxiety is one of the driving forces that can help. Although that adrenaline rush is necessary to reach one's personal best, anxiety needs to be channeled for positive use.

Conrad, in sixth grade, has been playing the cello since third grade. He is talented, loves to practice, and is one of the soloists in his school orchestra. Starting a day or two before each concert, his stomach tightens up whenever he thinks about playing. A few hours before the concert, he feels jumpy and is unable to relax. He rehearses his solo over and over again in his mind. Minutes before his solo, stress hormones course through his body, his breathing becomes rapid, and all his senses are heightened. But instead of causing him to fall apart with anxiety, these physical changes sharpen his abilities, and he plays his part perfectly and with intense feeling. The audience goes wild after he finishes.

Every performer, every person who wants to reach optimal performance, must learn how to take control of anxiety instead of being controlled by it, and use it in a positive way to enhance his or her life. Anxiety is also a motivator for making necessary life changes. For example, if your sixth-grade child underachieves because she doesn't feel like putting out an effort, but begins to worry about not making the grade in middle school, then her anxiety can jump-start her into becoming a good student.

Anxiety is also a normal response to life situations, such as experiencing the death of a loved one, having an illness, experiencing parental divorce, starting at a new school, taking a test, or getting the lead in the school play, which all create normal levels of anxiety and response.

Anxiety Differs from Fear

The words fear and anxiety are often used interchangeably, but they have different meanings. Fear is something external, specific, and definable. For example, if your child is waiting at the school bus stop and a car veers in her direction, her brain will instantly signal to her body, "Danger!" In a split second, her brain sends messages to her legs to jump out of the way to safety. The fear of being hurt by the car can be explained in specific terms. If you ask her, she'll say she was afraid and reacted by jumping out of the way.

Anxiety, on the other hand, is nonspecific; it's intangible in nature. There is no real bodily danger. For example, if your child is afraid to leave home to go to school, and you question why, he may not be able to give you a concrete answer, because anxious feelings are often hard to define. Maybe he fears something will happen to you when he is gone, or you will forget to pick him up at the bus stop, even though that has never happened. The "what-ifs"—the intense worry about the possibility that those things might happen—are what cause anxiety, making it very difficult for him to separate from you even for a few hours.

What Happens When Anxiety Turns Negative?

Anxiety becomes a problem when it causes emotional pain and suffering and disrupts your child's ability to function well at school and in daily life. When anxiety becomes that severe and chronic it is called a disorder. If your child has severe school anxiety, she will be limited in every area of development in her life because of the intensity of the feelings and symptoms. Anxiety disorders affect over 20 million adults, adolescents, and children in the United States, making it the number one mental health issue. Americans spend billions of dollars annually trying to alleviate anxious suffering by traditional and alternative modes of treatment.

Over 6 million school-age children suffer from school anxiety, trying to cope with physical and mental symptoms that are upsetting, even terrifying, at times.

What Is Anxiety?

Anxiety is defined as a state of intense agitation, foreboding, tension, and dread, occurring from a real or perceived threat of impending danger. The experience of anxiety is unique for each person, but it does have general physical and emotional characteristics.

It is important to note that the physical and mental symptoms of anxiety such as rapid heartbeat, stomachaches, and headaches are also found in many other medical conditions, like heart problems. If you, your child, or anyone in your family experiences persistent physical complaints, don't assume the cause is stress related but have the person checked by your family physician immediately.

Anxiety is a mind-body reaction that occurs instantaneously, and its effects are felt physiologically, behaviorally, and psychologically all at the same time. There are dozens of symptoms of anxiety that range from mild, such as having butterflies before answering a question in class, to severe, such as blanking out or having a panic attack when called to the board to solve a problem. It is important for you to be familiar with the symptoms of anxiety so you can explain to your child what is happening to him when he gets anxious. For example, if your child understands that the intense adrenaline rush he feels when anxiety hits cannot harm him, it may prevent his anxiety from spiraling out of control into a panic attack—instead he could learn to say to himself, "I know this is just a chemical in my body that is making me feel bad, but it can't really hurt me." Physical symptoms include the following:

Shallow breathing and hyperventilation

Intense rush of adrenaline and other stress hormones

Pounding heartbeat, heart palpitations, and sweating

Shaky limbs and trembling

Body and muscle tension

Dry mouth

Headaches

Nausea, diarrhea, and/or vomiting

Other physical manifestations of anxiety include skin eruptions, hives and rashes, fatigue, and eating and sleeping problems. The mental and emotional symptoms are equally distressing and include feeling overwhelmed, loss of concentration, feeling out of control, helplessness, hopelessness, anger, and shame. Behaviors in your child to watch for include acting-out behaviors such as angry outbursts and tantrums; refusal to go to school or to do homework; crying; inability to sleep; curtailment of activities; and avoidance of social situations, places, and certain people.

What Is School Anxiety?

School anxiety is being used as a broad term in this book. It refers, in part, to the problems from home that children bring to school including having an anxiety disorder; being learning disabled; or dealing with family issues, such as divorce or childhood trauma. However, the school environment can be a problematic place, too, with its emphasis on evaluation, achievement, and testing. Other factors might include peer pressure, being bullied, or not getting along with a teacher. This book will cover the myriad causes of school anxiety.

The Short- and Long-Term Effects of School Anxiety

Children with severe school anxiety are unlikely to outgrow it. However, the ways that anxiety manifests its effects can be damaging, making intervention and treatment essential to a child's health and well-being. Short-term effects of school anxiety include the following:

Missing out on important schoolwork if frequent absences or school refusal occur, stunting intellectual development and creating a record of poor academic performance

Not being able to relate well to peer group reduces social growth

Potential increase in frustration levels, stress, and tension among family members

Long-term effects of school anxiety can include chronic anxiety or the development of an anxiety disorder, chronic underachievement in school, low self-esteem, and difficulties in achieving a satisfying personal and professional adulthood.

Why Is My Child Anxious?

The answer to why a child has anxiety is complex. There is no known single cause of anxiety and many experts believe it is caused by a combination of innate characteristics and external experiences, situations, and events.

Heredity

DNA is a personal blueprint, determining height, hair color, body type, and innate talents. Even a person's attitude about life, certain behaviors, emotional structure, and the degree of sensitivity to internal and external stimuli have been linked to genetics through years of research. Anxiety and many related disorders seem to run in families.

Biology

The physical and mental manifestations of anxiety create an intense arousal to real or perceived dangers. The nervous system, which includes the brain, spinal cord, organs, nerves, and chemicals in the body, produces these symptoms and emotions. Many experts believe that people who experience high arousal to perceived danger have a malfunction in brain chemicals that send messages throughout the body telling it that there is real danger that needs to be responded to even when there is no actual threat.

Personality Type

The intrinsic qualities and characteristics that include beliefs, attitudes, thoughts, emotions, habits, and behaviors make up personality. How these biological, psychological, and sociological factors combine in a unique way as a personality continues to tantalize researchers. Children who experience a high degree of anxiety seem to share many of the same personality traits and characteristics, which include:

Greater degree of creativity and imagination; may have vivid mental images of himself in scary or terrifying situations leading to worry about the future; finds it difficult if not impossible to turn off these images.

Difficulty in or fear of expressing feelings because others may get angry, or fear of losing control of emotions.

Rigid thinking, for example, life is black or white, right or wrong; may be inflexible and unforgiving toward self and others.

Perfectionism—a setup for failure and anxiety because of the attempt to achieve unrealistic goals and the focus on minor mistakes and flaws instead of seeing the positive side of things.

Other personal characteristics associated with anxiety include having an excessive need for acceptance and approval from others to feel worthwhile; being extremely sensitive to criticism; comparing oneself negatively to others; and being unaware of or ignoring a high degree of stress to the point where anxiety manifests itself in other ways, for example, as a feeling of physical illness.

Childhood and Family Factors

Mental health experts agree that childhood experiences, including the parents' style of parenting, combine with the child's innate qualities, such as the child's degree of emotional sensitivity, in the development of anxiety disorders.

It is not uncommon for parents to blame themselves for their child's anxiety. Maybe a parent is anxious and feels the child has learned to be anxious or is overly sensitive because of hereditary factors. Some parents blame themselves for feeling helpless to stop their child's suffering. Perhaps you blame yourself for your child's school anxiety. If so, remember that being a parent is a difficult job—and we spend quite a bit of it flying by the seat of our pants, trying to figure out what is best for our child. This book is not about blame; it is about teaching you, the parent, how to help your child make changes that will lead to the development of good life-coping skills, a sense of confidence and capability, and a reduction in or end to school anxiety.

Suggested changes are provided at the end of each chapter and include taking a look at your household and the environment in which your child lives; deciding what aspects of it, if any, are contributing to your child's anxiety; and then following guidelines on what to do to change things to help your child. For example, if you are a highly stressed and anxious parent, you can learn how to de-stress and relax yourself, and then teach your anxious child how to calm himself too. If you are overprotective of your child, you can learn that instead of rescuing him all the time, you can work on teaching him how to solve problems, make decisions, and learn how to face his fear, so that his self-confidence will grow.

Learning, Physical, and Emotional Disabilities

Disabilities such as learning disorders, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism, and cerebral palsy are likely to cause academic and social struggles, which can lead to feelings of being stupid and lazy and to being isolated by peers.

Medications

Medications such as over-the-counter antihistamines or cold remedies may cause anxiety in sensitive children. Caffeine found in sodas or the sports drinks targeted to elementary school athletes is closely associated with anxiety, as is nicotine.

Significant Life Events/Traumatic Events

Major life events have an impact on how children feel and behave. Big changes often lead to anxiety, such as a move to a new school, the death of a parent, or a parent leaving for military duty, making it difficult for children to function in school without distress. Traumatic events, such as physical and sexual attacks, leave children feeling vulnerable and helpless and may lead to stress disorders that can have a negative impact on their ability to function well in the learning environment.

* * *

There are many resources available to help your child overcome school anxiety, which are discussed in this book. You will read about stress and why anxiety develops, and what exactly your child is experiencing when she is crying and begging you to let her stay home. Several chapters discuss in detail specific types of anxiety such as separation anxiety disorder, social anxiety, panic attacks, and the avoidance of situations. Also included are chapters on the anxiety produced by the demands of school, such as testing, doing homework, and dealing with bullies. Later in the book are chapters that have step-by-step instructions on how to teach your child to ease anxiety and take control of his anxiety instead of having it control him. These include the use of breathing, mental visualization, role playing, taking mock tests at home, and other techniques for overcoming school anxiety.

If your child has school anxiety, you have probably experienced a range of emotions from worry to frustration, maybe anger, and even downright fear about how your child is feeling and behaving and trying to figure out what in the world you can do about it. The book you hold in your hands contains information and a holistically oriented program that can assist you in helping your child become a successful, happy student.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from OVERCOMING SCHOOL ANXIETY by DIANE PETERS MAYER Copyright © 2008 by Diane Peters Mayer. Excerpted by permission of AMACOM. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2013

    Awful

    This book stinks. It doesn't help at all! My daughter is anxious and when I read the book and tried the techniques, it just made it worse!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2013

    How

    How do i dekete books????

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted January 9, 2012

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