The Overlook (Harry Bosch Series #13) [NOOK Book]

Overview

Near Mulholland Drive, Dr. Stanley Kent is found shot twice in the back of the head. It's the case LAPD detective Harry Bosch has been waiting for, his first since being recruited to the Homicide Special Squad. When he discovers that Kent had access to dangerous radioactive substances, what begins as a routine investigation becomes something darker, more deadly, and frighteningly urgent. Bosch is soon in conflict with not only his superiors but the FBI, which thinks the case is too important for just a cop. ...
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The Overlook (Harry Bosch Series #13)

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Overview

Near Mulholland Drive, Dr. Stanley Kent is found shot twice in the back of the head. It's the case LAPD detective Harry Bosch has been waiting for, his first since being recruited to the Homicide Special Squad. When he discovers that Kent had access to dangerous radioactive substances, what begins as a routine investigation becomes something darker, more deadly, and frighteningly urgent. Bosch is soon in conflict with not only his superiors but the FBI, which thinks the case is too important for just a cop. Complicating his job even more is the presence of Agent Rachel Walling, his onetime lover. Now guarding one slim advantage, Bosch relentlessly follows his own instincts, hoping they are still sharp enough to find the truth--and a killer who can annihilate an entire city.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Harry Bosch has been promoted from the LAPD Open Unsolved Unit to the Homicide Special Unit, but this supposedly greener pasture hasn't brought better sleep. His very first case at his new job involves the murder of a doctor with access to radioactive cesium. The investigation moves to red-alert status when it's discovered that a large quantity of the deadly material disappeared shortly before the killing. With the threat of an imminent terrorist attack hovering in his head, Bosch must not only track down the killers but also sidestep homeland security turf wars in the process. Thrilling with the deep tinge of reality.
Publishers Weekly

Reviewers were somewhat abrupt about perennial bestseller Connelly's 13th Harry Bosch novel: "a quick read, almost half the length of Connelly's previous novels," said one; "a tasty hors d'oeuvre" quipped another. How smart and fortunate for listeners that Hachette Audio has turned to veteran Connelly reader Len Cariou for some added weight. Cariou catches all the strength and sadness behind Bosch's minimal dialogue and is also perfect as Harry's LAPD colleagues, female and male. He is especially good at bringing to frightening life the real villains: the federal investigators, headed by a former Bosch lover, FBI agent Rachel Walling. The Feds are trying to take over the case of a body found on an overlook near Mulholland Drive-a doctor who turns out to have had access to radioactive materials stored at hospitals throughout L.A. All praise to Hachette for getting Cariou to help us through it. The production boasts original music by Frank Morgan. Simultaneous release with the Little, Brown hardcover (Reviews, Apr. 2). (May)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Forbes Magazine
Even though this book started as a serial—originally appearing in 16 installments in the New York Times Magazine—Connelly has molded it into a crisply written, smooth-flowing and gripping mystery. The hero, Harry Bosch, is an LAPD detective who’s had his share of internal battles with higher-ups, as well as with posturing politicians. The crime scene is the overlook above the Mulholland Dam in Los Angeles. A medical physicist has been executed, and his death may have been the work of terrorists. The victim had access to radioactive cesium, used in treating cancer. The terrorists had seized the physicist’s wife and told him to get as much cesium as possible, if he didn’t want her tortured and killed. He does so, but he—and not his wife—ends up being murdered. (1 Oct 2007)
—Steve Forbes
Library Journal

Series hero detective Harry Bosch, now of LAPD's Homicide Special Squad of the Robbery/Homicide division, is back with a vengeance. Connelly (Echo Park) delivers a masterly piece of contemporary fiction that goes beyond the average police procedural by drawing on the current fears of terrorism and the political ramifications created by attempts to thwart it. A medical physicist is murdered, and the radioactive material he worked with is stolen. Thus begins the search to find the killer and the urgent need to retrieve the materials. Again, the usual departmental and federal politics and the unexpected plot twists combine for a great work. Connelly's novels are quite simply only getting better with age; the banter of the murder investigation is smart and the action taut. This sixth narration of a Bosch mystery by Len Cariou is excellent and brings the characters to life. Highly recommended.
—Scott R. DiMarco

Library Journal
You've read it serialized in the New York Times magazine--or most of it, anyway, as there's new material here. Now get the book and prepare to be scared by the notion that radioactive cesium stolen from a doctor might lead to terrorism. With an eight-city tour. Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
In a 12-hour adventure first serialized in weekly installments in the New York Times Magazine, Harry Bosch finally catches a fresh case after years of resurrecting old ones (Echo Park, 2006, etc.), and it's a honey. Before he was shot to death at a scenic overlook on Mulholland Drive, Stanley Kent was a medical physicist who had access to the radioactive cesium used to treat uterine cancer. Because the murder looks like an execution, Bosch and his new partner, Ignacio ("call me Iggy") Ferras of LAPD Homicide Special, are under orders to grab the case from Hollywood Homicide. In a breathtakingly short time, though, it's grabbed from them by Rachel Walling, Bosch's former lover, and her take-no-prisoners FBI partner Jack Brenner. The reason: Shortly before he died, Kent had driven to St. Agatha's Clinic for Women and removed dozens of doses of cesium at the demand of the masked thugs who'd broken into his home, tied up his wife and threatened to rape and kill her. Alicia Kent is still alive, but her husband isn't, and the cesium has vanished. Captain Don Hadley, the well-connected nincompoop in charge of L.A.'s Department of Homeland Security, is convinced the threat of a dirty bomb is linked to anti-American provocateur Ramin Samir; the FBI is more intent on locating a Syrian terrorist who goes by the nickname Moby. But Bosch is convinced the Feds have missed important clues, and soon he's dug up an eyewitness to the crime and found new evidence at the Kent home. Both discoveries send him barreling into a series of jurisdictional battles that almost upstage the terrorist threat. A beautifully stripped-down case that makes up in tension and velocity what it lacks in amplitude. Serializationhasn't hurt Connelly any more than it did Charles Dickens, who's cited at several key points.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780316005227
  • Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
  • Publication date: 5/22/2007
  • Series: Harry Bosch Series , #13
  • Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 5,305
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Michael  Connelly
Michael Connelly is the author of the recent #1 New York Times bestsellers The Drop, The Fifth Witness, The Reversal, The Scarecrow, The Brass Verdict, and The Lincoln Lawyer, as well as the bestselling Harry Bosch series of novels. He is a former newspaper reporter who has won numerous awards for his journalism and his novels. He spends his time in California and Florida.

Biography

Best known for his dark police procedurals featuring the tough, complex and emotionally scarred LAPD detective, Hieronymous "Harry" Bosch, Michael Connelly has been called "infernally ingenious" (The New York Times), "one of those masters...who can keep driving the story forward in runaway locomotive style" (USA Today) and "the top rank of a new generation of crime writers" (The Los Angeles Times).

Consistently exquisite prose and engrossing storylines play an integral role in his swelling success. However, Connelly believes that solid character development is the most important key. As he explained to MagnaCumMurder.com, "I think books with weak or translucent plots can survive if the character being drawn along the path is rich, interesting and multi-faceted. The opposite is not true."

A native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Connelly attended the University of Florida; there he discovered the works of Raymond Chandler -- author of many classic Los Angeles-based noir dramas such as The Big Sleep, The Long Goodbye, and Farewell, My Lovely. The cases of Philip Marlowe inspired Connelly to be a crime novelist -- and by studying journalism, he put himself in the perfect position. "I went into journalism to learn the craft of writing and to get close to the world I wanted to write about -- police and criminals, the criminal justice system," he told MagnaCumMurder.com.

After graduation, Connelly worked the crime beat for two Florida newspapers. When a story he and a colleague wrote about the disastrous 1985 crash of Delta Flight 191 was short-listed for the Pulitzer, Connelly landed a gig in Marlowe's backyard, covering crime for one of the nation's largest newspapers -- The Los Angeles Times. Three years later, Harry Bosch was introduced in The Black Echo, which earned Connelly the Edgar Award for Best First Novel. Connelly has since won every major mystery honor, including the Anthony (The Poet, Blood Work) and the Macavity Award (Blood Work).

While Connelly has written stand-alone novels that don't feature his tragic protagonist Harry Bosch, he is best identified by his rigid, contentious and fiery -- but also immensely skilled and compassionate -- detective. According to The Boston Globe, the Bosch series "raises the hard-boiled detective novel to a new level...adding substance and depth to modern crime fiction."

Called "one of the most compelling, complex protagonists in recent crime fiction" (Newsweek) and "a terrific...wonderful, old-fashioned hero who isn't afraid to walk through the flames -- and suffer the pain for the rest of us" (The New York Times Book Review), Bosch faces unforgettable horrors every day -- either on the street or in his own mind. "Bosch is making up for wrongs done to him when he rights wrongs as a homicide detective," Connelly explained in an interview with his publisher. "In a way, he is an avenging angel."

Bosch is clearly a product of his deadly, unforgiving environment. "The philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche once wrote that when you look into the darkness of the abyss the abyss looks into you. Probably no other line or thought more inspires or informs my work," said Connelly in the same interview. With each passing novel, Bosch looks deeper and deeper into the abyss; and readers continue to return to see just how far he will gaze.

Good To Know

  • Michael Connelly received a huge career boost in 1994 when then President Bill Clinton was photographed walking out of a Washington bookstore with a copy of The Concrete Blonde under his arm. Connelly remarked to USA Today, "In the six years I've been writing books, that is the biggest thrill I've had."

  • Real events have always inspired Connelly's plots. His novel Blood Work was inspired by a friend who underwent transplant surgery and was coping with survivor's guilt, knowing someone had died in order for him to live. The book was later developed into a feature film starring Clint Eastwood, Angelica Huston, and Jeff Daniels.

  • One of Connelly's writing professors at the University of Florida was cult novelist Harry Crews.

  • Connelly named his most famous character after the 15th Century Dutch painter, Hieronymous Bosch. As he told Bookends UK in an interview, Bosch "created richly detailed landscapes of debauchery and violence and human defilement. There is a ‘world gone mad' feel to many of his works, including one called ‘Hell' -- of which a print hangs on the wall over the computer where I write." Some interesting outtakes from our interview with Connelly:

    "I wrote a mystery story as a class paper in high school. It was called The Perfect Murder. The protagonist's named was McEvoy, a name I later used for the protagonist in The Poet. Being a witness to a crime when I was 16 was what made me interested in crime novels and mystery stories."

    "I wrote my first real murder story as a journalist for the Daytona Beach News Journal in 1980. It was about a body found in the woods. Later, the murder was linked to a serial killer who was later caught and executed for his crimes."

    "Everything I want people to know about me is in my books."

  • Read More Show Less
      1. Hometown:
        Sarasota, Florida
      1. Date of Birth:
        July 21, 1956
      2. Place of Birth:
        Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
      1. Education:
        B.A. in Journalism, University of Florida, 1980
      2. Website:

    Read an Excerpt

    The Overlook


    By Michael Connelly

    Little, Brown and Company

    Copyright © 2007 Hieronymus, Inc.
    All right reserved.

    ISBN: 978-0-316-01895-1


    Chapter One

    The call came at midnight. Harry Bosch was awake and sitting in the living room in the dark. He liked to think that he was doing this because it allowed him to hear the saxophone better. By masking one of the senses he accentuated another.

    But deep down he knew the truth. He was waiting.

    The call was from Larry Gandle, his supervisor in Homicide Special. It was Bosch's first call out in the new job. And it was what he had been waiting for.

    "Harry, you up?"

    "I'm up."

    "Who's that you got playing?"

    "Frank Morgan, live at the Jazz Standard in New York. That's George Cables you're hearing now on piano."

    "Sounds like 'All Blues.'"

    "You nailed it."

    "Good stuff. I hate to take you away from it."

    Bosch used the remote to turn the music off.

    "What's the call, Lieutenant?"

    "Hollywood wants you and Iggy to come out and take over a case. They've already caught three today and can't handle a fourth. This one also looks like it might become a hobby. It looks like an execution."

    The Los Angeles Police Department had seventeen geographic divisions, each with its own station and detective bureau, including a homicide squad. But the divisional squads were the first line and couldn't get bogged down on long-running cases. When a murder came with any sort of political, celebrity or media attachment,it was usually shuttled down to Homicide Special, which operated out of the Robbery-Homicide Division in Parker Center. Any case that appeared to be particularly difficult and time-consuming - that would invariably stay active like a hobby - would also be an immediate candidate for Homicide Special. This was one of those.

    "Where is it?" Bosch asked.

    "Up on that overlook above the Mulholland Dam. You know the place?"

    "Yeah, I've been up there."

    Bosch got up and walked to the dining room table. He opened a drawer designed for silverware and took out a pen and a small notebook. On the first page of the notebook he wrote down the date and the location of the murder scene.

    "Any other details I should know?" Bosch asked.

    "Not a lot," Gandle said. "Like I said, it was described to me as an execution. Two in the back of the head. Somebody took this guy up there and blew his brains out all over that pretty view."

    Bosch let this register a moment before asking the next question.

    "Do they know who the dead guy is?"

    "The divisionals are working on it. Maybe they'll have something by the time you get over there. It's practically in your neighborhood, right?"

    "Not too far."

    Gandle gave Bosch more specifics on the location of the crime scene and asked if Harry would make the next call out to his partner. Bosch said he would take care of it.

    "Okay, Harry, get up there and see what's what, then call me and let me know. Just wake me up. Everybody else does."

    Bosch thought it was just like a supervisor to complain about getting woken up to a person he would routinely wake up over the course of their relationship.

    "You got it," Bosch said.

    Bosch hung up and immediately called Ignacio Ferras, his new partner. They were still feeling their way. Ferras was more than twenty years younger and from another culture. The bonding would happen, Bosch was sure, but it would come slowly. It always did.

    Ferras was awakened by Bosch's call but became alert quickly and seemed eager to respond, which was good. The only problem was that he lived all the way out in Diamond Bar, which would put his ETA at the crime scene at least an hour off. Bosch had talked to him about it the first day they had been assigned as partners but Ferras wasn't interested in moving. He had a family support system in Diamond Bar and wanted to keep it.

    Bosch knew that he would get to the crime scene well ahead of Ferras and that would mean he would have to handle any divisional friction on his own. Taking a case away from the divisional squad was always a delicate thing. It was a decision usually made by supervisors, not by the homicide detectives on the scene. No homicide detective worth the gold trim on his badge would ever want to give away a case. That just wasn't part of the mission.

    "See you there, Ignacio," Bosch said.

    "Harry," Ferras said, "I told you. Call me Iggy. Everybody does."

    Bosch said nothing. He didn't want to call him Iggy. He didn't think it was a name that matched the weight of the assignment and mission. He wished that his partner would come to that realization and then stop asking him.

    Bosch thought of something and added an instruction, telling Ferras to swing by Parker Center on his way in and pick up the city car they were assigned. It would add minutes to his arrival time but Bosch planned to drive his own car to the scene and he knew he was low on gas.

    "Okay, see you there," Bosch said, leaving names out.

    He hung up and grabbed his coat out of the closet by the front door. As he put his arms into it he glanced at himself in the mirror on the inside of the door. At fifty-six years old he was trim and fit and could even stand to add a few pounds, while other detectives his age were getting round in the middle. In Homicide Special, there was a pair of detectives known as Crate and Barrel because of their widening dimensions. Bosch didn't have to worry about that.

    The gray had not yet chased all of the brown out of his hair but it was getting close to victory. His dark eyes were clear and bright and ready for the challenge awaiting him at the overlook. In his own eyes Bosch saw a basic understanding of homicide work, that when he stepped out the front door he would be willing and able to go the distance - whatever that entailed - to get the job done. It made him feel as though he were bulletproof.

    He reached across his body with his left hand to pull the gun out of the holster on his right hip. It was a Kimber Ultra Carry. He quickly checked the magazine and the action and then returned the weapon to its holster.

    He was ready. He opened the door.

    The lieutenant had not known a lot about the case but he had been right about one thing. The crime scene was not far from Bosch's home. He dropped down to Cahuenga and then took Barham across the 101 Freeway. From there it was a quick run up Lake Hollywood Drive to a neighborhood of homes clustered on the hills surrounding the reservoir and the Mulholland Dam. They were expensive homes.

    He worked his way around the fenced reservoir, stopping only for a moment when he came upon a coyote in the road. The animal's eyes caught the headlights and glowed brightly. It then turned and sauntered slowly across the road, disappearing into the brush. It was in no hurry to get out of the way, almost daring Bosch to do something. It reminded him of his days on patrol, when he saw the same challenge in the eyes of most of the young men he encountered on the street.

    After passing the reservoir he took Tahoe Drive farther up into the hills and then connected with the eastern terminus of Mulholland Drive. There was an unofficial overlook of the city here. It was posted with NO PARKING and OVERLOOK CLOSED AT DARK signs. But these were routinely ignored at all hours of the day and night.

    Bosch pulled in behind the grouping of official vehicles - the Forensics van and the coroner's wagon as well as several marked and unmarked police cars. There was an outer perimeter of yellow police tape surrounding the crime scene and inside this boundary was a silver Porsche Carrera with its hood open. It had been sectioned off by more yellow tape and this told Bosch that it was most likely the victim's car.

    Bosch parked and got out. A patrol officer assigned to the outer perimeter took down his name and badge number - 2997 - and allowed him under the yellow tape. He approached the crime scene. Two banks of portable lights had been erected on either side of the body, which was in the center of a clearing that looked down upon the city. As Bosch approached he saw forensics techs and coroner's people working on and around the body. A tech with a video camera was documenting the scene as well.

    "Harry, over here."

    Bosch turned and saw Detective Jerry Edgar leaning against the hood of an unmarked detective cruiser. He had a cup of coffee in his hand and appeared to be just waiting. He pushed himself off the car as Bosch came over.

    Edgar had been Bosch's partner once, back when he had worked in Hollywood Division. Back then Bosch was a team leader on the homicide squad. Now Edgar was in that position.

    "Been waiting on somebody from RHD," Edgar said. "Didn't know it would be you, man."

    "It's me."

    "You working this solo?"

    "No, my partner's on the way."

    "Your new partner, right? I haven't heard from you since that mess over in Echo Park last year."

    "Yeah. So what do you have here?"

    Bosch didn't want to talk about Echo Park with Edgar. With anyone, as a matter of fact. He wanted to stay focused on the case at hand. It was his first call out since his transfer to Homicide Special. He knew there would be a lot of people watching his moves. Some of them would be people hoping he would fail.

    Edgar turned so that Bosch could see what was spread out on the trunk of the car. Bosch took out glasses and put them on as he leaned in close to look. There wasn't a lot of light but he could see an array of evidence bags. The bags separately contained items taken from the body. These included a wallet, a key ring and a clip-on name tag. There was also a money clip with a thick fold of currency and a BlackBerry that was still on, its green light flashing and ready to transmit calls its owner would never make or receive.

    "The coroner's guy just gave me all of this," Edgar said. "They should be done with the body in about ten minutes."

    Bosch picked up the bag containing the ID tag and angled it toward the light. It said Saint Agatha's Clinic for Women. On it was a photograph of a man with dark hair and dark eyes. It identified him as Dr. Stanley Kent. He was smiling at the camera. Bosch noticed that the ID tag was also a swipe key that could open locked doors.

    "You talk to Kiz much?" Edgar asked.

    It was a reference to Bosch's former partner, who had transferred after Echo Park to a management job in the OCP - the office of the chief of police.

    "Not too much. But she's doing fine."

    Bosch moved on to the other evidence bags and wanted to move the conversation away from Kiz Rider and onto the case at hand. "Why don't you run down what you've got for me, Jerry?" he said.

    "Happy to," Edgar said. "The stiff was found about an hour ago. As you can see from the signs out on the street, there is no parking up here and no loitering after dark. Hollywood always has a patrol swing by here a few times a night to chase lookyloos away. Keeps the rich locals up here happy. I am told that house over there is Madonna's. Or it was."

    He pointed to a sprawling mansion about a hundred yards from the clearing. The moonlight silhouetted a tower rising from the structure. The mansion's exterior was striped in alternating hues of rust and yellow like a Tuscan church. It was on a promontory that afforded anyone looking through its windows a magnificent, sweeping view of the city below. Bosch imagined the pop star up in the tower looking down on the city that lay at her command.

    Bosch looked back at his old partner, ready for the rest of the report.

    "The patrol car swings around about eleven and sees the Porsche with the hood open. Engine's in the back of those Porsches, Harry. It means the trunk was open."

    "Got it."

    "Okay, so you knew that already. Anyway, the patrol car pulls up, they don't see anybody in or around the Porsche, so the two officers get out. One of them walks out into the clearing and finds our guy. He's facedown and has two in the back of the head. An execution, clean and simple."

    Bosch nodded at the ID tag in the evidence bag.

    "And this is the guy, Stanley Kent?"

    "Looks that way. The tag and the wallet both say he's Stanley Kent, forty-two years old from just around the corner on Arrowhead Drive. We ran the plate on the Porsche and it comes back to a business called K and K Medical Physicists. I just ran Kent through the box and he came up pretty clean. He's got a few speeding tickets on the Porsche but that's it. A straight shooter."

    Bosch nodded as he registered all the information.

    "You are going to get no grief from me, taking over this case, Harry," Edgar said. "I got one partner in court this month and I left my other one at the first scene we caught today - a three-bagger with a fourth victim on life support at Queen of Angels."

    Bosch remembered that Hollywood ran its homicide squad in three-man teams instead of the traditional partnerships.

    "Any chance the three-bagger is connected to this?"

    He pointed to the gathering of technicians around the body on the overlook.

    "No, that's a straight gang shoot-'em-up," Edgar said. "I think this thing is a whole different ball game and I'm happy for you to take it."

    "Good," Bosch said. "I'll cut you loose as soon as I can. Anybody look in the car yet?"

    "Not really. Waiting on you."

    "Okay. Anybody go to the victim's house on Arrowhead?"

    "No on that, too."

    "Anybody knock on any doors?"

    "Not yet. We were working the scene first."

    Edgar obviously had decided early that the case would be passed to RHD. It bothered Bosch that nothing had been done but at the same time, he knew it would be his and Ferras's to work fresh from the start, and that wasn't a bad thing. There was a long history in the department of cases getting damaged or bungled while in transition from divisional to downtown detective teams.

    He looked at the lighted clearing and counted a total of five men working on or near the body for the forensics and coroner's teams.

    "Well," he said, "since you're working the crime scene first, did anybody look for foot impressions around the body before you let the techs approach?"

    Bosch couldn't keep the tone of annoyance out of his voice.

    "Harry," Edgar said, his tone now showing annoyance with Bosch's annoyance, "a couple hundred people stand around on this overlook every damn day. We coulda been looking at footprints till Christmas if we'd wanted to take the time. I didn't think we did. We had a body lying out here in a public place and needed to get to it. Besides that, it looks like a professional hit. That means the shoes, the gun, the car, everything's already long gone by now."

    Bosch nodded. He wanted to dismiss this and move on.

    "Okay," he said evenly, "then I guess you're clear."

    Edgar nodded and Bosch thought he might be embarrassed.

    "Like I said, Harry, I didn't expect it to be you." Meaning he would not have dogged it for Harry, only for somebody else from RHD.

    "Sure," Bosch said. "I understand."

    After Edgar left, Bosch went back to his car and got the Maglite out of the trunk. He walked back to the Porsche, put on gloves and opened the driver-side door. He leaned into the car and looked around. On the passenger seat was a briefcase. It was unlocked and when he popped the snaps it opened to reveal several files, a calculator and various pads, pens and papers. He closed it and left it in its place. Its position on the seat told him that the victim had likely arrived at the overlook by himself. He had met his killer here. He had not brought his killer with him. This, Bosch thought, might be significant.

    He opened the glove box next and several more clip-on IDs like the one found on the body fell to the floorboard. He picked them up one by one and saw that each access badge had been issued by a different local hospital. But the swipe cards all bore the same name and photo. Stanley Kent, the man (Bosch presumed) who was lying dead in the clearing.

    He noticed that on the back of several of the tags there were handwritten notations. He looked at these for a long moment. Most were numbers with the letters L or R at the end and he concluded that they were lock combinations.

    Bosch looked farther into the glove box and found even more IDs and access key cards. As far as he could tell, the dead man - if he was Stanley Kent - had clearance access to just about every hospital in Los Angeles County. He also had the combinations to security locks at almost every one of the hospitals. Bosch briefly considered that the IDs and key cards might be counterfeits used by the victim in some sort of hospital scam.

    Bosch returned everything to the glove box and closed it. He then looked under and between the seats and found nothing of interest. He backed out of the car and went to the open trunk.

    The trunk was small and empty. But in the beam of his flashlight he noted that there were four indentations in the carpet lining the bottom. It was clear that something square and heavy with four legs or wheels had been carried in the trunk. Because the trunk was found in the open position it was likely that the object - whatever it was - had been taken during the killing.

    "Detective?"

    (Continues...)



    Excerpted from The Overlook by Michael Connelly Copyright © 2007 by Hieronymus, Inc.. Excerpted by permission.
    All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
    Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.
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    See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 179 Customer Reviews
    • Posted November 29, 2011

      Not his best

      I have read all of the Harry Bosch books in order and I must say that I was a bit disappointed in this book. It just didn't hold my interest as much as the rest of Michael Connellly books I have read. I love the Harry Bosch series, but it is beginning to look like Harry is one of those types that likes to hold back information to make himself look better and I am a bit disappointed that my favorite character would be so selfish. However, even though this book was not one of my favorites, I am going to continue to read the Harry Bosch series until I have read them all. I think every writer puts out one or two books that just don't quite measure up to some of their previous books and this may have been one of those for Michael Connelly. Just my 2 cents worth...

      2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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    • Posted October 19, 2011

      Only a 161 pages

      Great Bosch read but not worth the money.

      2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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    • Posted January 20, 2012

      u must check this book

      a body has been found on the overlook near Mulholland drive the victim, identified as Dr. Stanley Kent, has two bullet holes in the back of his head from what it looks like. an execution- style shooting. LAPD detective harry Bosch is called out to Investigate.it is the case he has been waiting for, his first since being Recruited to the City homicide special squad. As soon as Bosch begins retracing Dr.Kent steps, contradictions emerge.while Kent Dosen't seem to organized crime, he did have access to dangerous rodioactive substances from just about every hopital in los Angeles country. what begins as a routine homicide investigation opens up before bosch into something much larger and more dangerous and much more.

      1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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    • Posted September 24, 2011

      more from this reviewer

      Too Simple

      CD unnabridged/Thriller: I thought this reading was abridged because it was only five CDs. However, it is just a really short book. This is my first Connelly book and it was a disappointment. It is really simple, too simple. There is no character development and it seem like Connelly phoned it in to his editor.
      The narrator should stay away from audiobooks. I am sure he is a good actor, but he has no upper register. Therefore he cannot do female voices. Everyone but Bosch, his partner and maybe a few others have a raspy voice. The victim's wife, 20-year old male, Rachel, and several others, all have sound like little old men trying to get words out.

      1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted January 31, 2014

      Highly Recommended

      Love Harry Bosch series

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    • Posted October 18, 2013

      Fine story

      A fine story in the continuing saga.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted October 4, 2013

      Not his best

      Was a little on the weak side not like Harry Bosch.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted May 27, 2013

      Easy Read but not one of his best

      Somewhat predictable and not up to Michael's best

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    • Posted May 17, 2013

      more from this reviewer

      What's up with Harry Bosch?

      I have to agree with many other reviewers of this short Harry Bosch tale ... none of the characters, especially Harry Bosch, are particularly likable. I think this is the first book in this genre that I found the main character to be a complete jerk and found it nearly impossible to care about. I did think the ending was an unexpected twist. It was a short, quick read ... wouldn't say I enjoyed the book. I guessing other books in this series must be better or there wouldn't be so many of them.

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    • Posted January 18, 2013

      Highly Recommended you have to read it for yourself

      Of all the Harry Bosch books I have read, I started from book one and I am working through the series, this was the best. In true Connelly form you are left in wonderment when discovering who really did what. The twists and turns keep you reading to the end. I think this book was the hardest to put down.

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    • Posted December 17, 2012

      more from this reviewer

      Not one of my favorites in the series

      a short book and not as good as his others in the Bosh Series. This was his first case since he left the LAPD's Open Unsolved Unit for the prestigious Homicide Special squad. Harry was called out to investigate a murder which involved national security. A doctor with access to a dangerous radioactive substance is found murdered in the trunk of his car. Retracing his steps, Harry learns that a large quantity of radioactive cesium was stolen shortly before the doctor's death. With the cesium in unknown hands, Harry fears the murder could be part of a terrorist plot to poison a major American city. Soon, Bosch is in a race against time, not only against the culprits, but also against the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI (in the form of Harry's one-time lover Rachel Walling), who are convinced that this case is too important for the likes of the LAPD.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted December 11, 2012

      Disappointing

      Disappointing. Too short. Too simple. Same old same old. Ebook was padded with two long excerpts from other books. Annoying.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted October 18, 2012

      Y do u want to no wat people look like?

      0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    • Posted September 21, 2012

      Highly recommended - hard to put down

      Michael Connelly pull's you into the story and has you pulling for Harry. He writes so well that you don't get lost in the technical part of it, you actually understand it, and find that you've been pulled into that world, just amazing. I love the Harry Bosch series and now that I have it on my nook it's easier to read in bed.

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    • Posted September 16, 2012

      Highly recommend

      Read anything you can get hold of by Michael Connelly, especially Harry Bosch series. Character development is excellent. Plots have excellent details and good pace. Good reads.

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    • Posted September 10, 2012

      Great short read

      This book was like all Michael Connelly stories (well writen). It held my attention and had several interesting twists. The only problem I have is the length of the story was so short it was disappointing.

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    • Posted August 26, 2012

      awesome

      awesome

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    • Posted May 23, 2012

      Fantastic

      Another great Bosch story!

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    • Posted May 1, 2012

      Highly Recommend

      Each installment in the series just keeps getting better. Michael Connelly has the knack to keep the reader glued to the page. Harry is one person I'd want on my side. Innocent or guilty, Harry wants the truth and you better not get in his way.

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    • Anonymous

      Posted April 12, 2012

      Alex

      Kay. Lol

      0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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    See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 179 Customer Reviews

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