Overreach: Leadership in the Obama Presidency

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Overview

When Barack Obama became president, many Americans embraced him as a transformational leader who would fundamentally change the politics and policy of the country. Yet, two years into his administration, the public resisted his calls for support and Congress was deadlocked over many of his major policy proposals. How could this capable new president have difficulty attaining his goals? Did he lack tactical skills?

In Overreach, respected presidential scholar George Edwards argues that the problem was strategic, not tactical. He finds that in President Obama's first two years in office, Obama governed on the premise that he could create opportunities for change by persuading the public and some congressional Republicans to support his major initiatives. As a result, he proposed a large, expensive, and polarizing agenda in the middle of a severe economic crisis. The president's proposals alienated many Americans and led to a severe electoral defeat for the Democrats in the 2010 midterm elections, undermining his ability to govern in the remainder of his term.

Edwards shows that the president's frustrations were predictable and the inevitable result of misunderstanding the nature of presidential power. The author demonstrates that the essence of successful presidential leadership is recognizing and exploiting existing opportunities, not in creating them through persuasion. When Obama succeeded in passing important policies, it was by mobilizing Democrats who were already predisposed to back him. Thus, to avoid overreaching, presidents should be alert to the limitations of their power to persuade and rigorously assess the possibilities for obtaining public and congressional support in their environments.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Obama’s team entered office under the assumption that “the recession left public opinion malleable and highly responsive to bold leadership,” but this study of Obama’s efforts to achieve too much too quickly shows how wrong this belief was. Political scientist Edwards (The Strategic President), a presidency scholar at Texas A&M, points out that given the recession, Bush’s massive TARP program, and several industry bailouts, a risk averse public was wary of new governmental initiatives. Using the bruising and barely won battle over health care reform as a case study, he reveals that a plurality of the public never favored it while the president has had difficulty framing the debate against a welter of competing media voices. Edwards’s analysis is particularly strong on the collapse of bipartisanship in Congress, and he marshals an impressive amount of data on public opinion and congressional voting records. However, his overall thesis that presidents “are not in strong positions to create opportunities for legislative success” but must use existing opportunities, is not fully fleshed out. He also falls short by ending with a discussion of the 2011 debt ceiling showdown instead of potential ways for Obama’s administration to move forward. Despite such omissions, this remains a clear, well-documented study of the limits on presidential power and influence. (Apr.)
Organiser
A valuable addition to the understanding of US polity.
— R. Balashankar
Organiser - R. Balashankar
A valuable addition to the understanding of US polity.
Choice
In Overreach, Edwards applies 'lessons learned' from his previous work on presidential leadership to the Obama presidency. Edwards argues that presidents do not create political opportunities, but must identify political openings and capitalize on existing political opportunities. . . . A readable book that will find a home in undergraduate courses on the U.S. presidency.
Books and Ideas.net - Aurelie Godet
Overreach is a clear and instructive essay, which, with an impressive amount of data (polls, television audience statistics, Congressional voting, and so on), confirms the arguments Edwards has been making since 2003.
Books and Ideas.net - Aurélie Godet
Overreach is a clear and instructive essay, which, with an impressive amount of data (polls, television audience statistics, Congressional voting, and so on), confirms the arguments Edwards has been making since 2003.
American Review of Politics - Richard W. Waterman
For more than two decades George C. Edwards has been carefully laying out a clear and consistently articulated argument about the nature of American politics. . . . Edwards's body of work is interesting in that each book builds upon the others. His newest book, Overreach: Leadership in the Obama Presidency, links his prior insights together and extends them into an analysis and critique of one incumbent president, Barack Obama.
From the Publisher

"[A] clear, well-documented study of the limits on presidential power and influence."--Publishers Weekly

"A valuable addition to the understanding of US polity."--R. Balashankar, Organiser

"In Overreach, Edwards applies 'lessons learned' from his previous work on presidential leadership to the Obama presidency. Edwards argues that presidents do not create political opportunities, but must identify political openings and capitalize on existing political opportunities. . . . A readable book that will find a home in undergraduate courses on the U.S. presidency."--Choice

"Overreach is a clear and instructive essay, which, with an impressive amount of data (polls, television audience statistics, Congressional voting, and so on), confirms the arguments Edwards has been making since 2003."--Aurélie Godet, Books and Ideas.net

"For more than two decades George C. Edwards has been carefully laying out a clear and consistently articulated argument about the nature of American politics. . . . Edwards's body of work is interesting in that each book builds upon the others. His newest book, Overreach: Leadership in the Obama Presidency, links his prior insights together and extends them into an analysis and critique of one incumbent president, Barack Obama."--Richard W. Waterman, American Review of Politics

"This book can stand on its own as a worthy case study of what to do and to avoid as America's most well-known and influential policy maker. I recommend this book for those who want to understand the contemporary Presidency and its relationship with Congress as it really is."--Gino J. Tozzi, Jr., Political Studies Review

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691153681
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 3/25/2012
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 248
  • Sales rank: 1,291,741
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author


George C. Edwards III is University Distinguished Professor of Political Science and the Jordan Chair in Presidential Studies at Texas A&M University. His many books include "The Strategic President." He is the editor of "Presidential Studies Quarterly."
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Table of Contents


Preface ix
Introduction 1
Chapter 1: Assessing Opportunities: Public Support 9
Chapter 2: Creating Opportunities? Going Public 36
Chapter 3: Evaluating Strategic Choices: Leading the Public 80
Chapter 4: Assessing Opportunities: Congressional Support 116
Chapter 5: Creating Opportunities? Leading Congress 135
Chapter 6: Evaluating Strategic Choices: Passing Legislation 157
Chapter 7: Persuasion and Opportunity in Presidential Leadership 179
Notes 189
Index 225
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