Owen & Mzee: The Language of Friendship
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Owen & Mzee: The Language of Friendship

4.5 13
by Hatkoff, Paula Kahumbu, Craig Hatkoff
     
 

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The in-demand follow-up to the New York Times bestseller, OWEN & MZEE, the friendship that has touched millions around the world.

In this exciting follow-up to OWEN & MZEE, the New York Times bestselling story about an orphaned baby hippo named Owen and the 130-year-old giant turtle, Mzee, Craig Hatkoff explores the language of love, friendship, and nurturance

Overview


The in-demand follow-up to the New York Times bestseller, OWEN & MZEE, the friendship that has touched millions around the world.

In this exciting follow-up to OWEN & MZEE, the New York Times bestselling story about an orphaned baby hippo named Owen and the 130-year-old giant turtle, Mzee, Craig Hatkoff explores the language of love, friendship, and nurturance that these two incredible creatures share with one another. This book traces their first year together, including their adorable playful ways and the unique "language" that they have developed.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

PW STARRED
Those who were captivated byOwen & Mzee: The True Story of a Remarkable Friendship -about the bond between a baby hippo orphaned by the 2004 tsunami and an adult tortoise living in the same Kenyan sanctuary-will find this follow-up equally mesmerizing. Again, Greste's crisp color photographs reveal these inseparable animal companions at remarkably close range. A standout sequence of nine frames allows readers to observe one of the unique ways the pair communicates: the now two-year-old Owen, signaling Mzee to move to the left, nudges the 130-year-old turtle's left rear foot. The two also communicate in their own "language," a deep rumbling sound that is not intuitive to either species. The authors (a youngster, her father and the manager of the Kenyan park) do raise questions about how the friendship will progress, as Owen grows to his adult size of 7,000 pounds, and his caretakers worry that he could unintentionally harm Mzee. Nonetheless, readers of all ages will likely concur with the authors' observation: "No matter how things turn out, the story of their friendship will always remind the world that when you need a friend, one will be there for you." Youngsters will eagerly await the next chapter in this extraordinary companionship. Ages 4-8.(Jan.)

Kirkus
In 2005, this father-daughter team, with the ecologist and the photographer, chronicled the irresistible story of the baby hippopotamus, orphaned by the December 2004 tsunami, which imprinted on the more-than-a-century-old Aldabra tortoise in a nature preserve in Kenya. Owen and
Mzee's story continues, with unexpected communication and devotion between the animals and the unexpected difficulties (Owen acts much more like a tortoise than a hippo). The photographs continue to be quite wonderful, and it is hard not to agree with the astonishment in the text: These animals communicate, play, eat and live together, though they are utterly dissimilar in every way. Their story is recapitulated in this volume, so even if they don't own the first, eager young readers can catch right up and be mesmerized, mystified and charmed. (natural history, maps, notes) (Picture book. 5-10)
. . .

Owen and Mzee are perhaps nature's most endearing odd couple. Owen is an orphaned baby hippo; his real-life best friend, Mzee, is a 130-year-old giant turtle. Having made their debut in 2006's hit photo-essay Owen & Mzee: The True Story of a Remarkable Friendship, the pair return in a cute follow-up that shows how their unlikely friendship flourished during the subsequent year.
Publishers Weekly
Those who were captivated by Owen & Mzee: The True Story of a Remarkable Friendship-about the bond between a baby hippo orphaned by the 2004 tsunami and an adult tortoise living in the same Kenyan sanctuary-will find this follow-up equally mesmerizing. Again, Greste's crisp color photographs reveal these inseparable animal companions at remarkably close range. A standout sequence of nine frames allows readers to observe one of the unique ways the pair communicates: the now two-year-old Owen, signaling Mzee to move to the left, nudges the 130-year-old turtle's left rear foot. The two also communicate in their own "language," a deep rumbling sound that is not intuitive to either species. The authors (a youngster, her father and the manager of the Kenyan park) do raise questions about how the friendship will progress, as Owen grows to his adult size of 7,000 pounds, and his caretakers worry that he could unintentionally harm Mzee. Nonetheless, readers of all ages will likely concur with the authors' observation: "No matter how things turn out, the story of their friendship will always remind the world that when you need a friend, one will be there for you." Youngsters will eagerly await the next chapter in this extraordinary companionship. Ages 4-8. (Jan.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature - Phyllis Kennemer
The extraordinary friendship between a small hippopotamus and a mature tortoise is further explored through describing the ways in which these two communicate with each other. Owen the hippo and Mzee the tortoise were introduced to the world in the first book, which described Owen's dramatic rescue after the tsunami and his incredible attraction to Mzee, who actually began exhibiting some mothering qualities which are not natural for reptiles. Their camaraderie has strengthened over the past year. They eat at the same times and travel through the grounds together—Owen slowing his pace to stay in sync with Mzee's deliberate movements. They communicate through nips and nudges when changing directions. But the most remarkable aspect of their friendship is a unique series of sounds they use together, which are not normal sounds for either hippos or turtles. When Mzee needed to be hospitalized for two weeks because of an infection, Owen made friends with Toto, a younger tortoise. Now the three friends spend most of their time together. The caretakers are concerned, however. Owen seems to have adapted fully to tortoise ways and does not seem to be aware that he is a hippopotamus. He is already twice the size of Mzee and could inadvertently injure his friend. It is unlikely that Owen would be accepted into an established pod of hippos. A possible solution exists in placing Owen with Cleo, another orphaned hippo who lives alone. Owen's story is not over. Another installment can most likely be expected. The large full-color photographs of Haller Park and the interactions of these friends are remarkable, adding meaning and insight to the understanding of this phenomenon of nature. A map ofKenya and further factual information about Owen, Mzee, and Haller Park appear in the back of the book.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 4
Owen & Mzee: The True Story of a Remarkable Friendship (Scholastic, 2006) chronicled the fascinating story of a baby hippo who was orphaned by the December 2004 tsunami and the bond he formed with Mzee, a 130-year-old Alhambra tortoise at a wildlife sanctuary in Kenya. This sequel updates readers on the status of that friendship a year and a half later, particularly with regard to the way this unusual duo has learned to communicate with one another. They apparently call back and forth, making sounds that hippos and tortoises do not usually make. The authors honestly discuss the issues that will face these two friends in the future, as their caretakers become increasingly concerned that Owen could become a danger to Mzee as he continues to grow. Other problems and possible solutions are discussed. The text is clearly written and accompanied by numerous high-quality, full-color photos of this unique pair. Children captivated by the first book will be thrilled to discover this one, and enough background information is provided so that readers coming to the story for the first time will be comfortable. A first purchase for most libraries.
—Grace OliffCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
In 2005, this father-daughter team, with the ecologist and the photographer, chronicled the irresistible story of the baby hippopotamus, orphaned by the December 2004 tsunami, which imprinted on the more-than-a-century-old Aldabra tortoise in a nature preserve in Kenya. Owen and Mzee's story continues, with unexpected communication and devotion between the animals and the unexpected difficulties (Owen acts much more like a tortoise than a hippo). The photographs continue to be quite wonderful, and it is hard not to agree with the astonishment in the text: These animals communicate, play, eat and live together, though they are utterly dissimilar in every way. Their story is recapitulated in this volume, so even if they don't own the first, eager young readers can catch right up and be mesmerized, mystified and charmed. (natural history, maps, notes) (Picture book. 5-10)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439899598
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
02/01/2007
Series:
Owen & Mzee Series
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
534,583
Product dimensions:
10.60(w) x 9.50(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
980L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author


Craig Hatkoff is the co-founder of the Tribeca Film Festival and of Turtle Pond Publications. Both Owen & Mzee: The True Story of a Remarkable Friendship and Owen & Mzee: The Language of Friendship are New York Times bestsellers. He lives with his wife and their two daughters in Manhattan.

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Owen & Mzee 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
MargieannVA More than 1 year ago
This is surely worth the read and your time as it is a book on friendship and acceptance and can be tailored for many age levels. Enjoy!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lilypad74 More than 1 year ago
A truly inspiring story of unlikely friendship rising out of disaster. This true tale amazes and delights as it recounts the heroic rescue of Owen, a baby hippo orphaned in the 2004 tsunami and follows him to an animal sanctuary where he meets the slow-moving Mzee, a giant tortoise. The patience of Mzee as Owen "adopts" him is depicted in touching photos detailing persistence, playfulness and loyalty as the two become acquainted and attached to each other. Children and adults alike will come to love the two as their friendship grows and blossoms. A beautiful story on every level, it teaches how appearances don't count...it's what in your heart that matters.
gege More than 1 year ago
a most amazing true story about the power of love and how a baby hippo decided that a giant tortoise was his new protector and mother.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A very special book. Recommended for children from five and up and their parents.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is documented with pictures of an elderly giant tortoise and an orphaned baby hippo that found each other after the tsunami in 2004. It's the story of an unlikely friendship between two animals. Readers will be moved by the example of love and companionship of a mammal and a reptile. To find out how they discovered each other and became friends, read this book!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Owen and Mzee was a good book because it is true and realistic. Owen Mzee is a about a hippopotamus who lives with his family. One day Owen got separated from his family and brought to the zoo. Then he met Mzee, a 150 year old turtle. Owen and Mzee were best friend but the problem Owen thought Mzee was her mother. Someone should read this book because I think it¿s a great book
Guest More than 1 year ago
The inspiring true story of two great friends, a baby hippo named Owen and a 130-yr-old giant tortoise named Mzee (Mm-ZAY). When Owen was stranded after the Dec 2004 tsunami, villagers in Kenya worked tirelessly to rescue him. Then, to everyone's amazement, the orphan hippo and the elderly tortoise adopted each other. Now they are inseparable, swimming, eating, and playing together. Adorable photos e-mailed from friend to friend quickly made them worldwide celebrities. Here is a joyous reminder that in times of trouble, friendship is stronger than the differences that too often pull us apart.