Owl at Home (I Can Read Book Series: Level 2)

Owl at Home (I Can Read Book Series: Level 2)

4.6 23
by Arnold Lobel
     
 

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Celebrated author and illustrator Arnold Lobel welcomes you to Owl's cozy home in this Level 2 I Can Read book. Parents and beginning readers who enjoy Lobel's Frog and Toad series will fall in love with these warm stories featuring Owl. Owl lives by himself in a warm little house. But whether Owl is inviting Winter in on a snowy night or welcoming a new friend he

Overview

Celebrated author and illustrator Arnold Lobel welcomes you to Owl's cozy home in this Level 2 I Can Read book. Parents and beginning readers who enjoy Lobel's Frog and Toad series will fall in love with these warm stories featuring Owl. Owl lives by himself in a warm little house. But whether Owl is inviting Winter in on a snowy night or welcoming a new friend he meets while on a stroll, Owl always has room for visitors! This beloved classic was created for kids who read on their own but still need a little help.

Supports the Common Core Learning Standards

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061974212
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
06/28/2011
Series:
I Can Read Book 2 Series
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
64
Sales rank:
186,878
Lexile:
370L (what's this?)
File size:
19 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
6 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Arnold Lobel (1933-1987) was the award-winning author and illustrator of many beloved children's books, including the classic I Can Read books about Frog and Toad, and the Caldecott Medal winning Fables.

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Owl at Home 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Owl at Home is one of the finest pieces of children's 'read-it-myself' literature. The gentle stories of the quintessentially innocent-of-the-ways-of-the-world Owl fill children with comfort and teach life lessons in the simplest of words. When Owl sees the moon on an evening stroll, he is filled with joy. When the moon dips out of sight, he is bereft, as though a close friend has died. 'It is always sad to say goodbye to a friend,' said Owl. When a close friend of my son's grandparents died, he was quiet and thoughtful about the sadness he saw around him. In a gathering of adults, someone apologized to him for not being playful that day. The Owl-wise 4 year old quietly patted his shoulder, 'It's alright. It is always sad to say goodbye to a friend.' The whole room fell silent. With simplicity and clarity, Owl at Home provides words that serve us all for many years.
gleyshull More than 1 year ago
I used to read this book to my kids on many many evenings. I loved it myself so much I bought it again recently, even though said kids are in their 20's with no grandkids in sight. I especially liked the last story, Owl and the Moon: "What a good, round friend you are!"
Guest More than 1 year ago
Owl At Home is the only ¿Owl¿ book that Lobel produced. Composed of five delightful tales, children will be delighted at the antics of owl and his misunderstandings! In the story, The Guest, Owl invites winter into his home with all of her fury! Snow is everywhere and his pea soup becomes frozen. Shooing winter out the door, she closes the door with a bang and Owl settles down once his fire is lit and warmth seeps back into this home. His soup thaws and Owl is once again contented! Strange Bumps is hysterical as Owl tries to figure out why there are two bumps at the end of his bed, under his covers! Owl¿s gyrations under the bed and under the covers are guaranteed to bring many laughs! Owl cannot figure out where they came from or why they will not leave. He finally settles into his easy chair in front of the fire to get a good night¿s sleep! Tear-Water Tea is delightful as we see Owl cooking is favorite tear-water tea with his own tears. He thinks of all the sad things he can, such as mornings nobody saw because everybody was sleeping and pencils that are too short to use. Filling up his kettle with his tears, he is ready to enjoy his favorite tea! A tad bit salty for me though. Upstairs and Downstairs depicts Owl running up and down his stairs to check on how the upstairs is doing and how the downstairs is doing. Owl does this all day long and into the evening and he discovers how tired he is and he cannot be in two places at once! Owl and the Moon is a cute tale of Owl befriending the Moon. Owl knows that the Moon cannot fit through his door, and it saddens him that the Moon, his friend, cannot come into his house. Getting ready for bed, Owl notices that Moon is shining outside and has indeed followed him home. Going to sleep, Owl is no longer sad, as his friend is right outside his door. Another wonderful Lobel, which is sure to delight and please readers young and old alike! I wish that Lobel had written more books on Owl!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I remember reading this with my mum when I was a kid, especially on cold winter nights. I'm fairly certain that most children will love it as much as I myself have. :)
HomeSchoolBookReview More than 1 year ago
Arnold Lobel won a Newbery Medal Award for one of his "Frog and Toad" books, which I think are excellent. The popularity of "Frog and Toad" may possibly overshadow the fact that Lobel has written a number of other very enjoyable books, such as Mouse Soup and Lucille. Owls are usually thought of as wise creatures, but Owl at Home is about a somewhat silly owl who lets the winter wind into his house to warm up (and finds his house getting cold), is scared when he goes to bed by strange bumps under his covers (where his feet are), uses tears to make tea (which is a little salty), tries to be both upstairs and downstairs at the same time by running up and down the stairs really fast, and tries to keep the moon from following him home. Young children should like these funny stories, and beginning readers can have the satisfaction of reading them on their own.
Carrielynn More than 1 year ago
What a fun book. I love reading it to my kids.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My grandson loves to read this book. He is four and really likes the stories.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Beautifully written, wonderful characters
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was a darling story that can make anyone laugh!! I really liked owl's outlook on life and I think that kids will get it, too.
WildStar More than 1 year ago
I bought this book to send to my son so he had a book to read in his son's kindergarten class. Periodically they allow parents to come in and read to the class. I selected this one because the story of the owl seems so cute and I know the children would like it, especially my grandson.
queenmaryg More than 1 year ago
The children were very excited that they could read this on their own with very little assistance from me.
psycheKK More than 1 year ago
For the past few weeks, my almost-five-year-old little boy has been having nightmares about owls.  The only way he will go to sleep is if our youngest cat, Molly Kitten, will curl up on his bed with him.  She will stay awake until my son falls asleep.  We thought these nightmares were imaginary because neither my husband nor I had seen an owl... until one night.  My husband was just putting my son back into bed and telling him there are no owls when he heard, "Whooooo.  Whoooo."  He looked out the window and saw two glowing owl eyes.  Molly jumped up to the window, tapped on the glass with her paw, and the owl flew away. The other day, I took my son to the bookstore and let him pick out any book he wanted.  He picked out Owl At Home, so we bought it and took it home and read it.  Owl At Home is a very likable owl, as likable, in fact, as Frog and Toad.  He just doesn't get the same attention that Frog and Toad do.  It's a pity, really, because apparently owls do need a positive mascot when it comes to kids.  This book, like the Frog and Toad books, is written and illustrated with scads of charm that holds up well to repeated, and often very slow, readings.  Sometimes the "classics" really are the best.
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