The Owl Who Was Afraid of the Dark by Jill Tomlinson, Paul Howard |, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Owl Who Was Afraid of the Dark

Owl Who Was Afraid of the Dark

by Jill Tomlinson, Paul Howard
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Jill Tomlinson’s gently instructive animal tales have had an enduring appeal, delighting children for decades. Funny and reassuring, and now beautifully repackaged, these are books to enjoy time and time again. Illustrator Paul Howard has collaborated on many books, including Bravest Ever Bear, written by the renowned Allan Ahlberg.

Overview

Jill Tomlinson’s gently instructive animal tales have had an enduring appeal, delighting children for decades. Funny and reassuring, and now beautifully repackaged, these are books to enjoy time and time again. Illustrator Paul Howard has collaborated on many books, including Bravest Ever Bear, written by the renowned Allan Ahlberg.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“‘The dark is scary,’ Plop tells Mommy Barn Owl, who wisely instructs him to learn a bit more about it before passing judgment.…As for the round, plump, and utterly fetching owl himself, he’s an irresistible ball of fluff who may well convert a host of readers to nighttime’s appeal.” —Publishers Weekly

Publishers Weekly
Howard's glorious nocturnal illustrations give new life to the late British author's 1968 tale of an owlet frightened of the night. "The dark is scary," Plop tells Mommy Barn Owl, who wisely instructs him to learn a bit more about it before passing judgment. Soon, Plop is off seeking new acquaintances, both human and animal, who tell him their favorite things about the evening, from fireworks and campfire singalongs to viewing the constellations ("The dark is wondrous. Look through the telescope," says one gentleman he meets). Tomlinson's reassuring tale is aimed squarely at preschoolers, who will thrill to a familiar scenario played out in an unusual setting. Howard's expertly shaded pastels evoke the owls' feather-softness against full-bleed illustrations in glowing, naturalistic colors, which he augments with smaller sepia vignettes. One particularly memorable scene features a close-up of Plop flanked by his parents, the three of them staring out at readers with the sparkle of a fireworks display reflected in their large eyes. As for the round, plump and utterly fetching Plop himself, he's an irresistible ball of fluff who may well convert a host of readers to nighttime's appeal. Ages 3-up. (Aug.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Adapted posthumously from the author's 1968 British "classic," this story aims to reassure nervous young children that the darkness is friendly. Plop, the baby barn owl, tells his parents that the nighttime is scary and they suggest he ask others how they feel about the dark. A boy tells Plop that fireworks are exciting; an old lady tells him that the dark is kind; a camping scout says the dark is fun; a girl tells him Santa can't come unless it's dark —never mind that Plop hasn't a clue who Santa is. And a black cat tells him that the dark is beautiful and shows him the sleeping British town. In this fantasy, an owl can talk to a cat without fear of reprisal, an astronomer can show an owl what the stars look like through a telescope, and everything turns out just right as Plop learns to love the night. Young children who accept that owls, at least in books, can talk to whatever or whomever they please, will find some comfort in the various interpretations of the pleasures of being out in the night and will find someone's opinion to identify with, although the old lady's is a stretch. While this anthropomorphic approach to the issue of night frights seems dated, at the very least the book provides adult readers with a conversational opener to help children explore their night feelings. Howard's pastel, pencil illustrations for this new edition depict the owl as a winsome, pudgy little fellow and the night activities are speckled with stars and points of light—a nice plus for lap reading. 2001 (orig. 1968), Candlewick, $15.99. Ages 3 to 8. Reviewer: Susan Hepler
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2-Plop the baby barn owl needs to overcome his fear of the night, because that's when he and his parents must go hunting. His understanding mother suggests that he ask various other creatures why they like the dark. A boy calls it exciting because he can see fireworks, an old lady finds it kind as she remembers past pleasures, a Boy Scout says it's fun because friends can sing around the campfire and drink cocoa, a girl maintains that it is necessary so that Santa can come, an astronomer terms it wondrous because he can see the constellations, and a cat simply points out the beauty of the sleeping town. Now convinced that the dark is just right, Plop becomes a night owl. This newly illustrated version of a British classic has winning full-page and page-and-a-half pastel pictures in midnight blues and soft daytime shades that show a sweetly fluffy owlet, his wide-eyed parents, and his new friends.-Patricia Pearl Dole, formerly at First Presbyterian School, Martinsville, VA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
New color illustrations introduce an English classic about a small barn owl-unfortunately and inexplicably named "Plop"-who learns to love the dark. At his mother's suggestion, Plop, who thinks the dark is scary, asks various people about it. Each (among them a boy, a scout, and an astronomer) gives him a personal reason for appreciating the night. At last, a black cat leads him away from his sleeping parents to the rooftops where, looking over the sleeping town, Plop realizes that the night really is beautiful, and that he really is a night bird. The full-page pastel illustrations are full of rich night hues of deep blue skies, light, and shadow, and smaller sketches on alternate pages show the little owl with his new acquaintances. Plop, though a fledged bird, appears smaller and softer than his owl parents and is a thoroughly endearing creature in these pictures, and the art carries the story over several weak spots. In one of Plop's less convincing encounters, a grandmotherly woman tells him that she likes the dark because it is kind, and she can forget that she is old-an idea more sentimental than true. In another-less universal than the fear of the dark that the tale addresses-a girl tells him that the dark is necessary so that Santa can come and fill the stockings for Christmas Day. But the fireworks that the boy invites Plop to watch are reflected in the big dark eyes of the young barn owl and his parents-a nicely dramatic depiction of the awe that night can hold. Parents and children are likely to overlook some pedestrian moments in the story for the overall reassurance it may bring. (Picture book. 4-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781405210935
Publisher:
Egmont UK
Publication date:
04/01/2005
Pages:
112
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.34(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Meet the Author


Jill Tomlinson's gently instructive animal tales have been charming children for decades. Illustrator Paul Howard has collaborated on many books, including Bravest Ever Bear.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >