Owly & Wormy, Friends All Aflutter!

Overview

Owly and Wormy want some butterflies! But when they come home from the nursery with a plant that will attract some fluttering friends, all that show up are fat, green bug things. Bug things are NOT butterflies! But, they are nice and fun and good at sleep outs under the stars and always up for a game of checkers. Fat, green bug might even be better than butterflies! Let’s be friends forever! But, the bug things can’t stay. When the bugs build their cocoons, Owly and Wormy think they have no friends left at all. ...

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Overview

Owly and Wormy want some butterflies! But when they come home from the nursery with a plant that will attract some fluttering friends, all that show up are fat, green bug things. Bug things are NOT butterflies! But, they are nice and fun and good at sleep outs under the stars and always up for a game of checkers. Fat, green bug might even be better than butterflies! Let’s be friends forever! But, the bug things can’t stay. When the bugs build their cocoons, Owly and Wormy think they have no friends left at all. They wait. And wait. And wait. And one day…their dreams have come true…and all a flutter! Owly’s friends are back….AND they've turned into butterflies.

Bold, graphic and full of fun, this wordless storybook will give pre-reader the wings they need to start reading on their own, and a firm footing on the idea of metamorphosis.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Fans of Runton's series of graphic novels know about Owly and Wormy's warm friendship and Owly's love for all living things. In the duo's first picture book, Owly learns that in order to attract the butterflies he yearns for, he must plant milkweed in his garden; however, he and Wormy are disconcerted by the caterpillars that show up. Since there's no text, their heated discussion is portrayed through speech balloons containing miniature illustrations and energetic punctuation: " = !" Wormy protests. " ≠ !" " = home," a baseball-capped caterpillar explains tearfully. Owly is a round ball with enormous, expressive eyes and pointy ears; tiny, blobby Wormy often perches on his head. Runton's colors are unabashedly cheerful—lemony yellows, sky blues, and velvety purple for night scenes—and clever, rewarding touches abound (when Owly gets a brainstorm, it's an efficient compact fluorescent light bulb that appears). Even very young children will be able to puzzle out the story's details from the expressions on the characters' faces, and Runton's unvarnished sentimentality creates an atmosphere of absolute security. Ages 3–7. (Mar.)
From the Publisher
Graphic novelist Runton trades off page count for picture-book-bright hues and tones in his first all-color Owly story. (Owly has been appearing in his own eponymous graphic-novel series since 2004.) Related in large and easy-to-follow pictures, the wordless episode (helped by occasional exchanges in rebuses) pairs sweet-natured Owly and his vermiform sidekick with two caterpillars who appear on a milkweed plant, become good friends and playmates through a variety of weathers, mysteriously disappear for some weeks and then, in a joyful denouement, at last emerge as monarch butterflies. Owly’s simple emotional ups and downs register as clearly as ever—so does the sense of time’s slow passage—and the huge-eyed bird radiates appeal even more strongly here than in his previous appearances as a line-drawn figure. The author/illustrator’s customary warm humor pervades this wee story: Wormy, upon seeing the chewed milkweed leaves, “speaks” in a rebus that illustrates a sick-looking flower with a thermometer in its mouth; an idea that strikes Owly combines old convention with newfangled eco-consciousness with a curly florescent light bulb that hovers over his head. New format, new look, same “Aw, shucks” story, art and characters. - KIRKUS, February 1, 2011, *STAR

Owly and Wormy, Friends All Aflutter!
Andy Runton, S&S/Atheneum, $15.99 (40p) ISBN 978-1-4169-5774-4
Fans of Runton's series of graphic novels know about Owly and Wormy's warm friendship and Owly's love for all living things. In the duo's first picture book, Owly learns that in order to attract the butterflies he yearns for, he must plant milkweed in his garden; however, he and Wormy are disconcerted by the caterpillars that show up. Since there's no text, their heated discussion is portrayed through speech balloons containing miniature illustrations and energetic punctuation: "[picture of milkweed] = [picture of butterflies]!" Wormy protests. "[picture of milkweed] ... [picture of caterpillars]!" "[Milkweed] = home," a baseball-capped caterpillar explains tearfully. Owly is a round ball with enormous, expressive eyes and pointy ears; tiny, blobby Wormy often perches on his head. Runton's colors are unabashedly cheerful—lemony yellows, sky blues, and velvety purple for night scenes—and clever, rewarding touches abound (when Owly gets a brainstorm, it's an efficient compact fluorescent light bulb that appears). Even very young children will be able to puzzle out the story's details from the expressions on the characters' faces, and Runton's unvarnished sentimentality creates an atmosphere of absolute security. Ages 3–7.

Publishers Weekly, January 10, 2011

Owly and Wormy, Friends All Aflutter!.

Runton, Andy (Author) , Runton, Andy (Illustrator)

Mar 2011. 40 p. Atheneum, hardcover, $15.99. (9781416957744).
Wormy and Owly, the stars of Runton’s Owly comics, here make the leap into their first picture book.
Wormy is taken with a flock of passing butterflies, so the two ask a raccoon florist what kind of flower
they should plant to attract some. When the recommended flower becomes home to two little green
caterpillars, they’re a bit put off but soon take a shine to the critters. But then the caterpillars disappear
before they have a chance to say good-bye. As in the Owly comics, symbols and small pictures take the
place of words in the dialogue balloons (e.g., when the raccoon wishes the duo good luck by “saying ” a
four-leafed clover). The story’s midsection is perhaps a little too drawn out for a compact picture-book
read, and kids hip to where butterflies come from will easily predict the final twist. On the other hand, the
opportunity to decode the dialogue visuals will keep viewers engaged throughout this gently challenging
offering. The big cartoon illustrations? A blast!
— Ian Chipman
BOOKLIST
, February 15, 2011

Children's Literature - Phyllis Kennemer
When Owly spots some butterflies in the distance, he thinks about how lovely it would be to have some nearby. He buys a milkweed plant from Mrs. Raccoon at the nursery and plants it in his yard. He places signs with pictures of butterflies around the plant and waits. Finally two bugs take up residence in the plant, but they do not resemble butterflies. They are look more like fat green worms. Owly is disappointed, but he allows the bugs to stay when they explain that they have no other home. He and Wormy befriend the strange creatures as they share many activities together. Then one day the bugs tell Owly and Wormy that they are leaving. Owly and Wormy miss their friends and mark the calendar with days that they have been gone. After a time, they notice some strange pods on the milkweed plant and watch in wonder as their bug friends emerge as butterflies. The reader knows they are the same creatures because one wears a bow and the other wears a baseball cap throughout. This wordless story is told entirely in brightly colored illustrations. Even the thought bubbles over the heads of the characters use pictures and symbols. Owly is a happy, round shaped bird and Wormy appears as a small yellow character perched on Owly's head most of the time. A good beginning book for young children to "read" by themselves. Part of the "Owly and Wormy" series. Reviewer: Phyllis Kennemer, Ph.D.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—Wildly popular as a graphic novel for elementary students, Owly is introduced to the younger set through a picture-book format. Essentially wordless, the story is told through illustrations and thought bubbles filled with pictures and symbols. The story begins as the two friends watch butterflies depart their garden. Owly's thought bubble shows three butterflies, an arrow, and a big question mark: Where are they going and why? He and Wormy decide that flowers will bring them back and begin an elaborate solution. Instead of butterflies, though, they are distraught to find two caterpillars munching away on the leaves. Though they initially tell the caterpillars to scram, the pals are swayed by their tearful plea that the plant is their home. The four become fast friends, at least until the caterpillars mysteriously disappear. Older readers will immediately guess what happened, but it is still fun to see Owly and Wormy's delight when their friends miraculously reappear. The large, full-color format makes the book easy for young readers to decode. Round, comforting shapes abound, particularly Owly with his bulbous eyes. With its cheerful palette, cartoon characters, and humorous expressions and details, this is a thoroughly endearing story.—Suzanne Myers Harold, Multnomah County Library System, Portland, OR
Kirkus Reviews

Graphic novelist Runton trades off page count for picture-book-bright hues and tones in his first all-color Owly story. (Owly has been appearing in his own eponymous graphic-novel series since 2004.) Related in large and easy-to-follow pictures, the wordless episode (helped by occasional exchanges in rebuses) pairs sweet-natured Owly and his vermiform sidekick with two caterpillars who appear on a milkweed plant, become good friends and playmates through a variety of weathers, mysteriously disappear for some weeks and then, in a joyful denouement, at last emerge as monarch butterflies. Owly's simple emotional ups and downs register as clearly as ever—so does the sense of time's slow passage—and the huge-eyed bird radiates appeal even more strongly here than in his previous appearances as a line-drawn figure. The author/illustrator's customary warm humor pervades this wee story: Wormy, upon seeing the chewed milkweed leaves, "speaks" in a rebus that illustrates a sick-looking flower with a thermometer in its mouth; an idea that strikes Owly combines old convention with newfangled eco-consciousness with a curly florescent light bulb that hovers over his head. New format, new look, same "Aw, shucks" story, art and characters. (Picture book. 2-5)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781416957744
  • Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date: 3/8/2011
  • Edition description: Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing
  • Pages: 40
  • Sales rank: 348,946
  • Age range: 3 - 7 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Andy Runton has always loved to draw. After college, he began a career in corporate America, but left when he decided to follow his heart (and love of comic books). He hasn’t looked back. Andy’s artwork portrays his affection for wildlife, especially little birds. He says he is happiest when he’s outside under a big Georgia sky. He lives in the greater-Atlanta area where he works full-time on Owly comics, books, and graphic novels. Visit him online at AndyRunton.com.

Andy Runton has always loved to draw. After college, he began a career in corporate America, but left when he decided to follow his heart (and love of comic books). He hasn’t looked back. Andy’s artwork portrays his affection for wildlife, especially little birds. He says he is happiest when he’s outside under a big Georgia sky. He lives in the greater-Atlanta area where he works full-time on Owly comics, books, and graphic novels. Visit him online at AndyRunton.com.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2012

    Meoe

    I love owly and am now the first one to write a review. I feel special.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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