The Oxford English Literary History, 1960-2000: The Last of England?

The Oxford English Literary History, 1960-2000: The Last of England?

5.0 1
by Randall Stevenson
     
 

The Oxford English Literary History is the new century's definitive account of a rich and diverse literary heritage that stretches back for a millennium and more.

Each of these groundbreaking volumes offers a leading scholar's considered assessment of the authors, works, cultural traditions, events, and ideas that shaped the literary voices of their age. The

…  See more details below

Overview

The Oxford English Literary History is the new century's definitive account of a rich and diverse literary heritage that stretches back for a millennium and more.

Each of these groundbreaking volumes offers a leading scholar's considered assessment of the authors, works, cultural traditions, events, and ideas that shaped the literary voices of their age. The series will enlighten and inspire not only everyone studying, teaching, and researching in English Literature, but all serious readers.

In the 1960s literature began to throw off its post-war weariness. New voices, new visions, and new commitments emerged and continued to reshape writing profoundly and excitingly throughout the rest of the century. Critics have scarcely begun to chart the scale and diversity of these changes. This new volume in The Oxford English Literary History maps them comprehensively. It also identifies the historical, social and intellectual pressures which brought them about. Throughout, literary developments are dexterously related to the wider evolution of English experience in the late twentieth century—to shadows of war and loss of empire; declining influences of class; shifting relations between the genders; emergent minority and counter-cultures; the broadening democratization of contemporary life in general. Analyses of the rise of literary theory, of publishing and the book trade, and of the pervasive influences of modernism and postmodernism contribute further to an impressively comprehensive, insightful account of this period—a far more imaginative and exciting one for English writing than has yet been generally recognized.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"This is an extraordinary book, both in its learning and its easy-going accessibility: an authoritative, yet truly companionable companion to modern English literature."—The Scotsman

"If you want to get a sense of the larger patterns to be found in the kaleidoscope of recent and contemporary writing then this book is a very good place to start."—Stefan Collini, Guardian Review

"The new Oxford English Literary History series [is] destined to become a standard academic source.... Advanced undergraduates will join lifelong learners in praising these volumes as sources of renewed and renewable literary energy."—The Providence Journal

Library Journal
In these volumes, former Edinburgh English professors King and Stevenson analyze recent English literary history, focusing on literary contributions produced in, or closely related to, England. Dedicating large sections to poetry, drama, and narrative, Stevenson links key literary events e.g., the rise of literary theory to relevant cultural history of the 1960s to today, from the declining influence of class to emerging minority and countercultures. Not surprisingly, Stevenson's broader focus has generated controversy in the United Kingdom, particularly regarding his evaluation of influential poets like Philip Larkin. Meanwhile, King surveys important contributions from West Indian, African, and Indian writers who settled in England, using a chronological organization, with each chapter covering prose, poetry, and drama. Exemplifying the books' differing approaches is their treatment of writer Linton Kwesi Johnson. Both praise him for developing a distinctive West Indian literary voice, but King's portrait is far more focused, including more personal background and details about his political contributions. Ultimately, King's work is more concise and readable overall, while Stevenson's is a helpful commentary that lacks a unifying thesis. Both books are best suited to university students and scholars. John McRae and Ronald Carters present a more concise survey of recent literature in The Routledge Guide to Modern English Writing. Likewise, Catherine Innes offers a broader guide in A History of Black and Asian Writing: 1700-2000. Marianne Orme, Des Plaines P.L., IL Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780198184232
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
02/01/2004
Series:
Oxford English Literary History Series, #12
Pages:
640
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 5.70(h) x 1.60(d)

Meet the Author

Randall Stevenson is Reader in English Literature and Deputy Head of Department at the University of Edinburgh. He is the author of Modernist Fiction; Reader's Guide to the Twentieth Century Novel in Britain, The British Novel Since the Thirties, as well as many articles on modernist and postmodernist fiction.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

The Oxford English Literary History, 1960-2000: The Last of England? 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Manirul More than 1 year ago
Awesome....! Awful..!