Oxford Handbook of Developmental Behavioral Neuroscience

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $38.02
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 73%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (7) from $38.02   
  • New (4) from $87.28   
  • Used (3) from $38.02   

Overview


The Oxford Handbook of Developmental Behavioral Neuroscience is a seminal reference work in the burgeoning field of developmental behavioral neuroscience, which has emerged in recent years as an important sister discipline to developmental psychobiology. This handbook, part of the Oxford Library of Neuroscience, provides an introduction to recent advances in research at the intersection of developmental science and behavioral neuroscience, while emphasizing the central research perspectives of developmental psychobiology. Contributors to the Oxford Handbook of Developmental Behavioral Neuroscience are drawn from a variety of fields, including developmental psychobiology, neuroscience, comparative psychology, and evolutionary biology, demonstrating the opportunities to advance our understanding of behavioral and neural development through enhanced interactions among parallel disciplines.

In a field ripe for collaboration and integration, the Oxford Handbook of Developmental Behavioral Neuroscience provides an unprecedented overview of conceptual and methodological issues pertaining to comparative and developmental neuroscience that can serve as a roadmap for researchers and a textbook for educators. Its broad reach will spur new insights and compel new collaborations in this rapidly growing field.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Christopher J Graver, PhD, ABPP-CN(Madigan Healthcare System)
Description: This book takes a multidisciplinary look at development psychobiology and updates the literature in this immense field.
Purpose: The editors aim to bring together information on theories and research regarding neural development that will apply to a large multidisciplinary research community.
Audience: The book will appeal to a wide range of scientists in the neurosciences, including cognitive neuroscientists, psychologists, developmental researchers, geneticists, and biologists. It assumes a moderately advanced level of biological and neuroscience knowledge; it is not intended for those new to the field. The editors and contributing authors provide a variety of knowledgeable perspectives.
Features: The initial chapters lay the groundwork for the rest of the book. While these are dense and make for slow reading, figures and tables gradually increase in number and quality. A nice summary table in the first chapter on neural development details various transcription factor genes and their CNS target. A second table nicely details the effects of chorion on behavioral variables. The figures become increasingly helpful and many are in high quality color. The discussion of phenotypic diversity in the face of a single genome is well handled. Later chapters begin to explore the development of individual brain systems in much more detail. The studies discussed range from animal to human and encompass various levels of analysis, such as single-cell recordings with high spatial localization and temporal distinction all the way to behavioral analysis of infants. Topics also are wide ranging from the most basic neuronal development to the highly complex cognitive functions of memory and adaptation. Each chapter begins with an abstract and is laid out in clear subsections with concluding paragraphs. The references are practically overflowing and generally current, and the index is highly detailed.
Assessment: This is a comprehensive and detailed look at developmental behavioral neuroscience from a variety of perspectives and research methodologies. It will be an exceedingly constructive companion for researchers and students alike.
From The Critics
Reviewer:Christopher J. Graver, PhD(Madigan Army Medical Center)
Description:This book takes a multidisciplinary look at development psychobiology and updates the literature in this immense field.
Purpose:The editors aim to bring together information on theories and research regarding neural development that will apply to a large multidisciplinary research community.
Audience:The book will appeal to a wide range of scientists in the neurosciences, including cognitive neuroscientists, psychologists, developmental researchers, geneticists, and biologists. It assumes a moderately advanced level of biological and neuroscience knowledge; it is not intended for those new to the field. The editors and contributing authors provide a variety of knowledgeable perspectives.
Features:The initial chapters lay the groundwork for the rest of the book. While these are dense and make for slow reading, figures and tables gradually increase in number and quality. A nice summary table in the first chapter on neural development details various transcription factor genes and their CNS target. A second table nicely details the effects of chorion on behavioral variables. The figures become increasingly helpful and many are in high quality color. The discussion of phenotypic diversity in the face of a single genome is well handled. Later chapters begin to explore the development of individual brain systems in much more detail. The studies discussed range from animal to human and encompass various levels of analysis, such as single-cell recordings with high spatial localization and temporal distinction all the way to behavioral analysis of infants. Topics also are wide ranging from the most basic neuronal development to the highly complex cognitive functions of memory and adaptation. Each chapter begins with an abstract and is laid out in clear subsections with concluding paragraphs. The references are practically overflowing and generally current, and the index is highly detailed.
Assessment:This is a comprehensive and detailed look at developmental behavioral neuroscience from a variety of perspectives and research methodologies. It will be an exceedingly constructive companion for researchers and students alike.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Christopher J. Graver, PhD, ABPP-CN(Madigan Healthcare System)
Description: This book takes a multidisciplinary look at development psychobiology and updates the literature in this immense field.
Purpose: The editors aim to bring together information on theories and research regarding neural development that will apply to a large multidisciplinary research community.
Audience: The book will appeal to a wide range of scientists in the neurosciences, including cognitive neuroscientists, psychologists, developmental researchers, geneticists, and biologists. It assumes a moderately advanced level of biological and neuroscience knowledge; it is not intended for those new to the field. The editors and contributing authors provide a variety of knowledgeable perspectives.
Features: The initial chapters lay the groundwork for the rest of the book. While these are dense and make for slow reading, figures and tables gradually increase in number and quality. A nice summary table in the first chapter on neural development details various transcription factor genes and their CNS target. A second table nicely details the effects of chorion on behavioral variables. The figures become increasingly helpful and many are in high quality color. The discussion of phenotypic diversity in the face of a single genome is well handled. Later chapters begin to explore the development of individual brain systems in much more detail. The studies discussed range from animal to human and encompass various levels of analysis, such as single-cell recordings with high spatial localization and temporal distinction all the way to behavioral analysis of infants. Topics also are wide ranging from the most basic neuronal development to the highly complex cognitive functions of memory and adaptation. Each chapter begins with an abstract and is laid out in clear subsections with concluding paragraphs. The references are practically overflowing and generally current, and the index is highly detailed.
Assessment: This is a comprehensive and detailed look at developmental behavioral neuroscience from a variety of perspectives and research methodologies. It will be an exceedingly constructive companion for researchers and students alike.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780195314731
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 11/10/2009
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 784
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 1.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Mark S. Blumberg is the F. Wendell Miller Professor of Psychology at the University of Iowa. He is the author of three books and more than eighty journal articles and book chapters on a wide variety of subjects. He currently serves as Editor-in-Chief of the journal Behavioral Neuroscience.

John H. Freeman is Professor of Psychology at the University of Iowa. He is the author of more than sixty journal articles and currently serves as Associate Editor of the journal Behavioral Neuroscience.

Scott R. Robinson is Associate Professor of Psychology and head of the Laboratory for Comparative Ethogenesis at the University of Iowa. He has authored more than 100 journal articles and chapters on various subjects in ethology and developmental psychobiology. He has also edited one book on fetal behavioral development.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1. The Value of Truly Comparative and Holistic Approaches in the Neurosciences
Patrick Bateson
2. Developmental Systems Theory
Timothy D. Johnston
3. Rethinking Epigenesis and Evolution in Light of Developmental Science
Robert Lickliter and Hunter Honeycutt
4. Brain Development: Genes, Epigenetic Events, and Maternal Environments
Pierre L. Roubertoux, Marc Jamon, and Michèle Carlier
5. Programmed Cell Death during Nervous System Development: Mechanisms, Regulation, Functions, and Implications for Neurobehavioral Ontogeny
Ronald W. Oppenheim, Carol Milligan, and Woong Sun
6. Development of GABAergic Signaling: From Molecules to Emerging Networks
Kai Kaila, Peter Blaesse, and Sampsa T. Sipilä
7. Neural Activity and Visual System Development
Tony del Rio and Marla B. Feller
8. Early Patterns of Electrical Activity in the Developing Cortex
Rustem Khazipov and Gyorgy Buzsaki
9. Experience in the Perinatal Development of Action Systems
Michele R. Brumley and Scott R. Robinson
10. Development of Spinal Cord Locomotor Networks Controlling Limb Movements
Laurent Vinay, Edouard Pearlstein, and François Clarac
11. Development of Spinal Motor Networks Controlling Axial Movements
Keith Sillar
12. Role of Spontaneous Movements in Imprinting an Action-Based Body Representation in the Spinal Cord
Jens Schouenborg
13. Developmental and Comparative Neuroscience: Epigenetics, Evolution, and Behavior Development of Sound Localization Mechanisms
Daniel J. Tollin
14. Early Sensory Experience, Behavior, and Gene Expression in Caenorhabditis elegans
Evan Ardiel, Susan Rai, and Catharine H. Rankin
15. Development of Central Visceral Circuits
Linda Rinaman and Thomas J. Koehnle
16. Maternal Care as a Modulating Influence on Infant Development
Frances A. Champagne and James P. Curley
17. Mechanisms of Plasticity in the Development of Cortical Somatosensory Maps
Reha S. Erzurumlu
18. Cross-Modal Plasticity in the Mammalian Neocortex
Sarah J. Karlen, Deborah L. Hunt, and Leah Krubitzer
19. Factors Influencing Neocortical Development in the Normal and Injured Brain
Bryan Kolb, Celeste Halliwell, and Robbin Gibb
20. The Form and Function of Infant Sleep: From Muscle to Neocortex
Mark S. Blumberg and Adele M. H. Seelke
21. Perinatal Gonadal Hormone Influences on Neurobehavioral Development
Joseph S. Lonstein
22. Development of Ingestive Behavior: The Influence of Context and Experience on Sensory Signals Modulating Intake
Susan E. Swithers
23. Multilevel Development: The Ontogeny of Individual and Group Behavior
Jeffrey R. Alberts and Jeffrey C. Schank
24. Ontogeny of Multiple Memory Systems: Eyeblink Conditioning in Rodents and Humans
Mark E. Stanton, Dragana Ivkovich Claflin, and Jane Herbert
25. The Ontogeny of Fear Conditioning
Rick Richardson and Pamela S. Hunt
26. Developmental Neurobiology of Cerebellar Learning
John H. Freeman
27. Developmental Neurobiology of Olfactory Preference and Avoidance Learning
Regina M. Sullivan, Stephanie Moriceau, Tania Roth, and Kiseko Shionova
28. Development of the Hippocampal Memory System: Creating Networks and Modifiable Synapses
Teodore C. Dumas and Jerry W. Rudy
29. Development of Medial Temporal Lobe Memory Processes in Non-Human Primates
Alyson Zeamer, Maria C. Alvarado, and Jocelyne Bachevalier
30. Episodic Memory: Comparative and Developmental Issues
Michael Colombo and Harlene Hayne
31. Hormones and the Development of Communication-Related Social Behavior in Birds
Elizabeth Adkins-Regan
32. The Development of Anti-Predator Behavior
Jill M. Mateo
33. Comparative Perspectives on the Missing Link: Communicative Pragmatics
Julie Gros-Louis, Meredith J. West, and Andrew P. King
34. From Birds to Words: Perception of Structure in Social Interactions Guides Vocal Development and Language Learning
Michael H. Goldstein and Jennifer A. Schwade
35. Relaxed Selection and the Role of Epigenesis in the Evolution of Language
Terrence W. Deacon

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)