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The Oxford Handbook of Free Will / Edition 1
     

The Oxford Handbook of Free Will / Edition 1

5.0 1
by Robert Kane
 

ISBN-10: 0195178548

ISBN-13: 9780195178548

Pub. Date: 01/13/2005

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

This comprehensive reference provides an exhaustive guide to current scholarship on the perennial problem of Free Will--perhaps the most hotly and voluminously debated of all philosophical problems. While reference is made throughout to the contributions of major thinkers of the past, the emphasis is on recent research. The essays, all previously unpublished, combine

Overview

This comprehensive reference provides an exhaustive guide to current scholarship on the perennial problem of Free Will--perhaps the most hotly and voluminously debated of all philosophical problems. While reference is made throughout to the contributions of major thinkers of the past, the emphasis is on recent research. The essays, all previously unpublished, combine the work of established scholars with younger thinkers who are beginning to make significant contributions. Taken as a whole, the Handbook provides an engaging and accessible roadmap to the state of the art thinking on this enduring topic.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780195178548
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
01/13/2005
Series:
Oxford Handbooks Series
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
656
Product dimensions:
9.70(w) x 6.70(h) x 1.90(d)

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

Contributors
1. Introduction: The Contours of Contemporary Free Will Debates
PART I: THEOLOGY AND FREE WILL
2. Divine Foreknowledge and Human Freedom
PART II: PHYSICS, DETERMINISM AND INDETERMINISM
3. Quantum Physics, Consciousness and Free Will
4. Chaos, Indeterminism and Free Will
5. The Causal Closure of Physics
PART III: THE CONSEQUENCE ARGUMENT FOR INCOMPATIBILISM
6. The Consequence Argument Revisited
7. A Compatibilist Reply to the Consequence Argument
PART IV: COMPATIBILIST PERSPECTIVES ON FREEDOM AND RESPONSIBILITY
8. Compatibilism Without Frankfurt: Dispositional Analyses of Free Will
9. Contemporary Compatibilism: Mesh Theories and Reasons-Responsive Theories
10. Moral Sense and the Foundations of Responsibility
11. Whose Still Afraid of Determinism? Rethinking Causes and Possibilities
PART V: MORAL RESPONSIBILITY, ALTERNATIVE POSSIBILITIES AND FRANKFURT-TYPE EXAMPLES
12. Frankfurt-type Examples and Semi-Compatibilism
13. Frankfurt-friendly Libertarianism
14. Obligation, Reason and Frankfurt Examples
PART VI: LIBERTARIAN PERSPECTIVES ON FREE AGENCY AND FREE WILL
15. Agent-Causal Theories of Freedom
16. Alternatives for Liberarians
17. Freedom and Action Without Causation: Noncausal Theories of Freedom and Purposive Agency
18. Free Will is Not a Mystery
19. Rethinking Free Will: New Perspectives on an Ancient Problem
PART VII: FURTHER VIEWS AND ISSUES: HARD DETERMINISM, HARD INCOMPATIBILISM, ILLUSIONISM, REVISIONISM, PROMISES AND ROLLBACKS
20. Free Will Skepticism and Meaning in Life
21. Free Will, Fundamental Dualism and the Centrality of Illusion
22. Effects, Determinism, Neither Compatibilism Nor Incompatibilism, Consciousness
23. Revisionist Accounts of Free Will: Origins, Varieties and Challenges
24. A Promising Argument
25. Rollbacks, Endorsement and Indeterminism
26. Free Will and Science
27. Contributions of Neuroscience to the Free Will Debate
28. Free Will and the Bounds of the Self
29. Intuitions about Free Will, Determinism and Bypassing
References
Index

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The Oxford Handbook of Free Will 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I first encountered Kane's facility with the notoriously-challenging problem of free will in his book *The Significance of Free Will.* At that time, I realized that Kane had an almost suspicious talent for articulating my own objections, and then articulating a response that usually satisfied me more than my own. While such a talent may be a bit threatening for readers who occasionally find themselves desiring to claim their own victories, Kane's affability and enthusiasm always seem to leave the reader with a sense of pride in having participated in his well-authenticated jaunts. This book, in particular, highlights Kane's skills as both an original author and an editor with an honest eye for the best arguments of his opponents. It will certainly become a staple, if it has not already, for professional scholars of free will and curious by-standers alike. The *Oxford Handbook of Free Will* draws together balanced selections from the most relevant authors in the field, and-despite its depth-manages to cover a range broad enough that the book would be equally well placed on the shelves of theologians, philosophers, and physicians. My main criticism is that the compilation does not contain some selections I find relevant for the debate. Then again, such a problem *should* be inevitable for a field as contested as that of free will, and is minimized by Kane's need to balance his equations. The Oxford group has again demonstrated their wisdom in selecting Kane as the editor of this volume. Compared to its competitors in the often-dreary pantheon of free-will texts, this volume will leave you energized to jump into the next argument (rather than feeling deflated by the fact that there remain more arguments to be broached).