The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Neuroscience

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Overview


The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Neuroscience is a state-of-the-art collection of interdisciplinary research spanning philosophy (of science, mind, and ethics) and current neuroscience. Containing chapters written by some of the most prominent philosophers working in this area, and in some cases co-authored with neuroscientists, this volume reflects both the breadth and depth of current work in this exciting field. Topics include the nature of explanation in neuroscience; whether and how current neuroscience is reductionistic; consequences of current research on the neurobiology of learning and memory, perception and sensation, neurocomputational modeling, and neuroanatomy; the burgeoning field of neuroethics and the neurobiology of motivation that increasingly informs it; implications from neurology and clinical neuropsychology, especially in light of some bizarre symptoms involving misrepresentations of self; the extent and consequences of multiple realization in actual neuroscience; the new field of neuroeudamonia; and the neurophilosophy of subjectivity.

This volume will interest philosophers working in numerous fields who wish to see how current neuroscience is being brought to bear directly on philosophical issues. It will also be of interest to neuroscientists who wish to learn how the research programs of some of their colleagues are being enriched by interaction with philosophers, and finally to those working in any interdisciplinary field who wish to see how two seemingly disparate disciplines--one traditional and humanistic, the other new and scientific--are being brought together to both disciplines' mutual benefit.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780195304787
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 7/27/2009
  • Series: Oxford Handbooks Series
  • Pages: 656
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 9.80 (h) x 2.20 (d)

Meet the Author

John Bickle is Professor of Philosophy, University of Cincinnati

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Table of Contents

Notes on the Contributors Editor's Introduction

Part I: Explanation, Reduction, and Methodology in Neuroscientific Practice:
Chapter 1: Molecules, systems, and behavior: Another view of memory consolidation Chapter 2: Biological clocks: Explaining with models of mechanisms Chapter 3: Methodology and reduction in the behavioral neurosciences: Object exploration as a case study, Chapter 4 The Science of Research and the search for molecular mechanisms of cognition

Part II: Learning and Memory:
Chapter 5: The lower bounds of cognition: What do spinal cords reveal?
Chapter 6: Lessons for cognitive science from neurogenomics Chapter 7: Neuroscience, learning, and the return to behaviorism

Part III: Sensation and Perception:
Chapter 8: fMRI: A modern cerebrascope? The case of pain Chapter 9: The enactive field, the embedded Neuron Chapter 10: The role of neurobiology in differentiating the senses Chapter 11: Enactivism's vision: Neurocognitive basis or neurocognitively baseless?

Part IV: Neurocomputation and Neuroanatomy:
Chapter 12: Space, time, and objects Chapter 13: Neurocomputational models: Theory, application, philosophical consequences Chapter 14: Neuroanatomy and cosmology

Part V: Neuroscience of Motivation, Decision Making, and Neuroethics:
Chapter 15: The emerging theory of motivation Chapter 16: Inference to the best decision Chapter 17: Emergentism at the crossroads of philosophy, neurotechnology, and the enhancement debate Chapter 18: What's neu in neuroethics?

Part VI: Neurophilosophy and Psychiatry: Chapter 19 Confabulations about people and their limbs, present or absent
Chapter 20: Delusional experience Chapter 21: The case for animal emotions: Modeling neuropsychiatric disorders

Part VII: Neurophilosophy:
Chapter 22: Levels and individual variation: Implications for the multiple realization of psychological properties Chapter 23: Neuro-eudaimonics, or Buddhists lead neuroscientists to the seat of happiness The neurophilosophy of subjectivity Chapter 24: The neurophilosophy of subjectivity Notes on the Contributors Editor's Introduction, John Bickle, (University of Cincinnati)
Part I: Explanation, Reduction, and Methodology in Neuroscientific Practice
1. Molecules, systems, and behavior: Another view of memory consolidation, William Bechtel, (University of California, San Diego)
2. Biological clocks: Explaining with models of mechanisms, Sarah K. Robins and Carl F. Craver, (Washington University, St. Louis)
3. Methodology and reduction in the behavioral neurosciences: Object exploration as a case study, Anthony Chemero and Charles J. Heyser, (Franklin and Marshall College)
4. The Science of Research and the search for molecular mechanisms of cognition, Alcino J. Silva, (University of California, Los Angeles) and John Bickle, (University of Cincinnati)
Part II: Learning and Memory
5. The lower bounds of cognition: What do spinal cords reveal?, Colin Allen, (Indiana University, Bloomington), Jim Grau, (Texas A&M University), and Mary Meagher, (Texas A&M University)
6. Lessons for cognitive science from neurogenomics, Alex Rosenberg, (Duke University)
7. Neuroscience, learning, and the return to behaviorism,, Peter Machamer, (University of Pittsburgh)
Part III: Sensation and Perception
8. fMRI: A modern cerebrascope? The case of pain, Valerie Gray Hardcastle, (University of Cincinnati) and C. Matthew Stewart, (Johns Hopkins University)
9. The enactive field, the embedded Neuron, Mazviita Chirimuuta, (Monash University, Australia) and Ian Gold, (McGill University)
10. The role of neurobiology in differentiating the senses, Brian L. Keeley, (Pitzer College)
11. Enactivism's vision: Neurocognitive basis or neurocognitively baseless?, Charles Wallis and Wayne Wright, (California State University, Long Beach)
Part IV: Neurocomputation and Neuroanatomy
12. Space, time, and objects, Rick Grush, (University of California, San Diego)
13. Neurocomputational models: Theory, application, philosophical consequences, Chris Eliasmith, (University of Waterloo)
14. Neuroanatomy and cosmology, Christopher Cherniak, (University of Maryland)
Part V: Neuroscience of Motivation, Decision Making, and Neuroethics
15. The emerging theory of motivation, Anthony Landreth, (University of California, Los Angeles)
16. Inference to the best decision, Patricia Smith Churchland, (University of California, San Diego)
17. Emergentism at the crossroads of philosophy, neurotechnology, and the enhancement debate, Eric Racine, (Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal) and Judy Illes, (University of British Columbia)
18. What's neu in neuroethics?, Adina Roskies, (Dartmouth College)
Part VI: Neurophilosophy and Psychiatry
19. Confabulations about people and their limbs, present or absent, William Hirstein, (Elmhurst College)
20. Delusional experience, Jennifer Mundale, (University of Central Florida) and Shaun Gallagher, (University of Central Florida and University of Hertfordshire)
21. The case for animal emotions: Modeling neuropsychiatric disorders, Kenneth Sufka, (University of Mississippi), Morgan Weldon, (University of Mississippi), and Colin Allen, (Indiana University, Bloomington)
Part VII: Neurophilosophy
22. Levels and individual variation: Implications for the multiple realization of psychological properties, Ken Aizawa, (Centenary College of Louisiana) and Carl Gillett, (Northern Illinois University)
23. Neuro-eudaimonics, or Buddhists lead neuroscientists to the seat of happiness; The neurophilosophy of subjectivity, Owen Flanagan, (Duke University)
24. The neurophilosophy of subjectivity, Peter Mandik, (William Paterson University)

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