The Oxford Handbook of Social Relations in the Roman World

Overview


The study of Roman society and social relations blossomed in the 1970s. By now, we possess a very large literature on the individuals and groups that constituted the Roman community, and the various ways in which members of that community interacted. There simply is, however, no overview that takes into account the multifarious progress that has been made in the past thirty-odd years. The purpose of this handbook is twofold. On the one hand, it synthesizes what has heretofore been accomplished in this field. On ...
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Overview


The study of Roman society and social relations blossomed in the 1970s. By now, we possess a very large literature on the individuals and groups that constituted the Roman community, and the various ways in which members of that community interacted. There simply is, however, no overview that takes into account the multifarious progress that has been made in the past thirty-odd years. The purpose of this handbook is twofold. On the one hand, it synthesizes what has heretofore been accomplished in this field. On the other hand, it attempts to configure the examination of Roman social relations in some new ways, and thereby indicates directions in which the discipline might now proceed.

The book opens with a substantial general introduction that portrays the current state of the field, indicates some avenues for further study, and provides the background necessary for the following chapters. It lays out what is now known about the historical development of Roman society and the essential structures of that community. In a second introductory article, Clifford Ando explains the chronological parameters of the handbook. The main body of the book is divided into the following six sections: 1) Mechanisms of Socialization (primary education, rhetorical education, family, law), 2) Mechanisms of Communication and Interaction, 3) Communal Contexts for Social Interaction, 4) Modes of Interpersonal Relations (friendship, patronage, hospitality, dining, funerals, benefactions, honor), 5) Societies Within the Roman Community (collegia, cults, Judaism, Christianity, the army), and 6) Marginalized Persons (slaves, women, children, prostitutes, actors and gladiators, bandits). The result is a unique, up-to-date, and comprehensive survey of ancient Roman society.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"The Oxford Handbook of Social Relations in the Roman World is a valuable guide to many directions in contemporary research, and both editor and authors are to be congratulated for providing an essential resource." --Classical Journal

"These are all wonderful essays that make the book a very rewarding read. This is a superb volume: both the editor and the contributors have to be congratulated for producing it!" --Bryn Mawr Classical Review

"Peachin introduces and edits an exemplary contribution to the current academic genre of handbooks/companions to topics/authors. Thirty-five internationally known scholars of Roman History contribute significant studies on a wide range of topics not well discussed in standard compendia on Roman literature and history. All students of Roman society, from undergraduate to scholars, will profitably and enjoyably read everything in this handbook. Highly Recommended." --CHOICE

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780195188004
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 12/31/2010
  • Series: Oxford Handbooks Series
  • Pages: 768
  • Product dimensions: 7.10 (w) x 9.80 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Michael Peachin is Professor of Classics, New York University

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements; Abbreviations; I. Prefatory Material - 1. Introduction to the Volume (Michael Peachin); 2. From Republic to Empire (Clifford Ando); II. Mechanisms of Socialization - 3. Making Romans in the Family (Josiah Osgood); 4. Primary Education (Marietta Horster); 5. Rhetorical Education (Joy Connolly); 6. Philosophy as Socio-Political Upbringing (Johannes Hahn); 7. Law and Social Formation in the Roman Empire (Dennis P. Kehoe); III. Mechanisms of Communication and Interaction - 8. Literature and Communication (Charles W. Hedrick, Jr.); 9. Epigraphy and Communication (Elizabeth A. Meyer); 10. Communicating with Tablets and Papyri (Andrea Jördens); 11. Coins and Communication (Carlos F. Noreña); IV. Communal Contexts for Social Interaction - 12. Élite Self-Representation in Rome (Harriet I. Flower); 13. Public Speaking in Rome: A Question of Auctoritas (Francisco Pina Polo); 14. The Second Sophistic (Thomas A. Schmitz); 15. Roman Society in the Courtroom (Leanne Bablitz); 16. Public Entertainments (Kathleen M. Coleman); 17. Socializing at the Baths (Garrett G. Fagan); V. Modes of Interpersonal Relations - 18. Roman Honor (J.E. Lendon); 19. Friendship among the Romans (Koenraad Verboven); 20. Hospitality among the Romans (John Nicols); 21. Roman Dining (Katherine M.D. Dunbabin and William J. Slater); 22. Violence in Roman Social Relations (Garrett G. Fagan); VI. Societies Within the Roman Community - 23. Organized Societies: Collegia (Jonathan S. Perry); 24. The Roman Army (David Potter); 25. Graeco-Roman Cultic Societies (John Scheid); 26. Ancient Jewish Social Relations (Seth Schwartz); 27. Christian Society (Adam H. Becker); VII. Marginalized Persons - 28. Slaves in Roman Society (Leonhard Schumacher); 29. Women in Roman Society (Kristina Milnor); 30. Children in the Roman Family and Beyond (Jens-Uwe Krause); 31. Roman Prostitutes and Marginalization (Thomas A.J. McGinn); 32. Between Marginality and Celebrity: Entertainers and Entertainments in Roman Society (Hartmut Leppin); 33. Magicians and Astrologers (J.B. Rives); 34. The Roman Bandit (Latro) as Criminal and Outsider (Werner Riess); 35. Physically Deformed and Disabled People (Johannes Stahl)

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