The Oxford Handbook of Sound Studies

Overview


Written by the world's leading scholars and researchers in the emerging field of sound studies, The Oxford Handbook of Sound Studies offers new and fully engaging perspectives on the significance of sound in its material and cultural forms. The book considers sounds and music as experienced in such diverse settings as shop floors, laboratories, clinics, design studios, homes, and clubs, across an impressively broad range of historical periods and national and cultural contexts....
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (9) from $29.77   
  • New (5) from $39.00   
  • Used (4) from $29.77   
Sending request ...

Overview


Written by the world's leading scholars and researchers in the emerging field of sound studies, The Oxford Handbook of Sound Studies offers new and fully engaging perspectives on the significance of sound in its material and cultural forms. The book considers sounds and music as experienced in such diverse settings as shop floors, laboratories, clinics, design studios, homes, and clubs, across an impressively broad range of historical periods and national and cultural contexts.

Science has traditionally been understood as a visual matter, a study which has historically been undertaken with optical technologies such as slides, graphs, and telescopes. This book questions that notion powerfully by showing how listening has contributed to scientific practice. Sounds have always been a part of human experience, shaping and transforming the world in which we live in ways that often go unnoticed. Sounds and music, the authors argue, are embedded in the fabric of everyday life, art, commerce, and politics in ways which impact our perception of the world. Through an extraordinarily diverse set of case studies, authors illustrate how sounds -- from the sounds of industrialization, to the sounds of automobiles, to sounds in underwater music and hip-hop, to the sounds of nanotechnology -- give rise to new forms listening practices. In addition, the book discusses the rise of new public problems such as noise pollution, hearing loss, and the "end" of the amateur musician that stem from the spread and appropriation of new sound- and music-related technologies, analog and digital, in many domains of life.

Rich in vivid and detailed examples and compelling case studies, and featuring a companion website of listening samples, this remarkable volume boldly challenges readers to rethink the way they hear and understand the world.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"The wealth of audiovisual examples in these links and the breadth of the topics covered make this handbook a valuable scholarly reference and teaching resource. Bibliographies and notes at the end of each essay and the comprehensive index increase the book's usefulness as a reference tool...Essential." --Choice

"A substantial and commendable addition to its field of study, laying out current trends among its most prominent scholars while also looking ahead to issues that can shape future scholarly investigation of sound and human experience." --ARSC Journal

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780199995813
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • Publication date: 4/1/2013
  • Series: Oxford Handbooks Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 612
  • Product dimensions: 6.60 (w) x 9.60 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Trevor Pinch is Professor of Science and Technology Studies at Cornell University, and author or co-author of several books including Analog Days: The Invention and Impact of the Moog Synthesizer (2002, with Frank Trocco) and The Golem at Large: What You Should Know About Technology (1993, 1998, with Harry Collins).

Karin Bijsterveld is Professor of Science, Technology and Modern Culture at Maastricht University. She is author of Mechanical Sound: Technology, Culture and Public Problems of Noise in the Twentieth Century (2008), and co-editor of Sound Souvenirs: Audio Technologies, Memory and Cultural Practices (2009, with José van Dijck).

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Contributors
List of Figures
Introduction: New Keys to the World of Sound - Trevor Pinch and Karin Bijsterveld
SECTION I: REWORKING MACHINE SOUND: SHOP FLOOR & TEST SITES
1. The Garden in the Machine: Listening to Early American Industrialization - Mark M. Smith
2. Turning a Deaf Ear? Industrial Noise and Noise Control in Germany since the 1920s - Hans-Joachim Braun
3. "Sobbing, whining, rumbling": Listening to Automobiles as Social Practice - Stefan Krebs
4. Selling Sound: Testing, Designing, and Marketing Sound in the European Car Industry - Eefje Cleophas and Karin Bijsterveld
SECTION II: STAGING SOUND FOR SCIENCE AND ART: THE FIELD
5. Sound Sterile: Making Scientific Field Recordings in Ornithology - Joeri Bruyninckx
6. Underwater Music: Tuning Composition to the Sounds of Science - Stefan Helmreich
7. A Grey Box: The Phonograph in Laboratory Experiments and Field Work, 1900-1920 - Julia Kursell
SECTION III. STAGING SOUND FOR SCIENCE AND ART: THE LAB
8. From Scientific Instruments to Musical Instruments: The Tuning Fork, Metronome, and Siren - Myles W. Jackson
9. Conversions: Sound and Sight, Military and Civilian - Cyrus Mody
10. The Search for the 'Killer Application': Drawing the Boundaries Around the Sonification of Scientific Data - Alexandra Supper
SECTION IV: SPEAKING FOR THE BODY: THE CLINIC
11. Inner and Outer Sancta: Ear Plugs and Hospitals - Hillel Schwartz
12. Sounding Bodies: Medical Studies and the Acquisition of Stethoscopic Perspectives - Tom Rice
13. Do Signals Have Politics? Inscribing Abilities in Cochlear Implants - Mara Mills
SECTION V: EDITING SOUND: THE DESIGN STUDIO
14. Sound and Player Immersion in Digital Games - Mark Grimshaw
15. The Sonic Playpen: Sound Design and Technology in Pixar's Animated Shorts - William Whittington
16. The Avant-garde in the Family Room: American Advertising and the Domestication of Electronic Music in the 1960s and 1970s - Timothy Taylor
SECTION VI: CONSUMING SOUND AND MUSIC: THE HOME AND BEYOND
17. Visibly Audible: The Radio Dial as Mediating Interface - Andreas Fickers
18. From Listening to Distribution: Non-official Music Practices in Hungary and Czechoslovakia from the 1960s to the 1980s - Trever Hagen with Tia DeNora
19.The Amateur in the Age of Mechanical Music - Mark Katz
20. Online Music Sites as Sonic Sociotechnical Communities: Identity, Reputation, and Technology at ACIDplanet.com - Trevor Pinch and Katherine Athanasiades
SECTION VII: MOVING SOUND AND MUSIC: DIGITAL STORAGE
21. Analog turns Digital: Hip-hop, Technology, and the Maintenance of Racial Authenticity - Ray Fouche
22. iPod Culture: The Toxic Pleasures of Audiotopia - Michael Bull
23. The Recording that Never Wanted to be Heard, and Other Stories of Sonification - Jonathan Sterne and Mitchell Akiyama
Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)