Ozma of Oz (Illustrated - Trilogus Classics)

Ozma of Oz (Illustrated - Trilogus Classics)

4.3 31
by L. Frank Baum
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

This is the fourth book in the Illustrated Oz series, from Trilogus Classics. It has been published and may be enjoyed, along with the other books in this series, in no particular order.

While traveling to Australia with her Uncle Henry, Dorothy is swept overboard with a hen named Billina. They land in Ev, a country across the desert from Oz, and, together…  See more details below

Overview

This is the fourth book in the Illustrated Oz series, from Trilogus Classics. It has been published and may be enjoyed, along with the other books in this series, in no particular order.

While traveling to Australia with her Uncle Henry, Dorothy is swept overboard with a hen named Billina. They land in Ev, a country across the desert from Oz, and, together with new-found mechanical friend Tik-Tok, they must save Ev's royal family from the evil Nome King. With Princess Ozma's help, they finally return to Oz.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940012008657
Publisher:
Trilogus Media Group
Publication date:
12/27/2010
Series:
The Illustrated Oz , #3
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
4 MB
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

L. Frank Baum (1856-1919) is the author of 69 children's books, including the popular 14 titles of the Oz series. He was born Lyman Frank Baum on May 15, 1856 near Syracause, New York. He had a privileged, if isolated childhood, due to wealthy parents and a congenitally weak heart. Instructed by a seroes of tutors, he spent a great deal of time in his oilman father's library, voraciously reading. As a young man, Baum returned home after a brief stint at a military academy, there to indulge his tastes in writing, stamp collecting and raising chickens. He grew up a man of great charm and many interests, but very little direction. At various times in his career, he ran was a reporter, an actor, theatre manager and playwright. One of his productions became a hit, and he traveled with its touring company throughout the U.S. and Canada during the 1880s. Returning home on a break in the schedule, Baum met Maud Gage, whom he married in November 1882. She provided him with the stability and common sense he lecked, as well as the discipline their children would require. When Maud was pregnant with their first child, all his play's scenery, props and costumes were destroyed by fire. He returned home to work in the family's oil business, all the while writing a succession of plays that were never produced. In the late 1880's, Baum moved his wife and two sons to the Dakota territory, where he worked as a shopkeeper and a newspaper editor. In spite of his enjoyment of them, both positions failed him financially. By 1891, he and Maud had four sons, and the family moved for a better life to Chicago. First a newspaper reporter, Baum soon took a better paying job as a traveling crockery salesman. At the advice of his mother-in-law, he began to write down some of the stories he made up to tell his sons in the evening. One of these tales, Mother Goose in Prose, was published to moderate success in 1897. Baum quit the road and became the editor of a journal for window-dressers. In 1899, he teamed with artist W.W. Denslow, and in 1899 published the follow-up "Father Goose, His Book", which became a best seller. In 1900, one of the five children's books he published with illustrations again by Denslow, was "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz". The other 13 volumes followed in quick succession, intermingled with lesser works which eventually prompted Baum to reopen Oz, after declaring it closed midway through the series. He died in 1919, amid both failing health and a dwindling fortune.

Read More

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
May 15, 1856
Date of Death:
May 6, 1919
Place of Birth:
Chittenango, New York
Place of Death:
Hollywood, California
Education:
Attended Peekskill Military Academy and Syracuse Classical School

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Ozma of Oz 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 31 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
EXELENT book! Read it! P.S. and I MEAN IT!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ozma of Oz is a MUST READ. Children and adults alike will love Ozma of Oz. The full color illustrations are amazing. I also read The Wizard of Oz, and much prefer this installation in the Oz series. New characters like Princess Langwidere, a head collecting ruler, Tik Tok, the mechanical man, and Ozma are delightful and dynamic. Dorothy's adventure in this book is far more interesting, with more cliff hanger moments and evil tyrant, the Gnome King. Overall this book is far more intricate and includes handfulls of new characters and new stories that make the land of Oz that much more wonderful.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Is this the comic version?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved the book, I now cannot wait to see the movie!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
That phrse is on every couple pages and really takes you out of the book. Other thsn that its great.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
95 cents, not 95¿
Man_Of_La_Book_Dot_Com More than 1 year ago
Ozma of Oz by L. Frank Baum is the third story in the fic­tional series tak­ing place in the land of Oz. While cer­tainly not as pop­u­lar the first story in the series the rest are very imag­i­na­tiveas well. on a vaca­tion from Kansas to Aus­tralia, Uncle Henry and his niece Dorothy Gale are caught in a fierce storm which throws Dorothy off the ship. Dorothy finds her­self in a crate with Bil­lina, a yel­low hen. As the sur­vivors wash ashore, Dorothy dis­cov­ers that Bil­lina can talk and guess they are in a”fairy coun­try” but not Oz because of the seashore. Soon they meet Tik-Tok, a mechan­i­cal man and go to the Land of Ev. There our trav­el­ers meet Ozma, the Tin Woods­man, the Cow­ardly Lion, The Scare­crow as well as the Hun­gry Tiger who are there also to res­cue the royal family. Ozma of Oz by L. Frank Baum is less dark then the pre­vi­ous books, more fairy tale like but all fun­nier and less annoy­ing. I loved the parts where Ozma’s army, which con­sisted of many offi­cers but only one solider, was part of. From some rea­son that struck me as hillerious. I have to say that the rea­son I enjoyed Ozma of Oz more than the pre­vi­ous two is because the nar­ra­tive is more stream­lined. There are less side sto­ries and bet­ter focus on a sin­gle goal which is more tan­gi­ble than just an idea (“home”). Also, there is less chau­vin­ism and racism than the pre­vi­ous books, espe­cially book 2 The Mar­velous Land of Oz. The char­ac­ters, espe­cially the female ones, are no-nonsense and say what they mean straight and to the point. This is a fun read, short and worth the time spent.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago