Ozma Of Oz

( 30 )

Overview

Ozma of Oz, published on July 29, 1907, was the third book of L. Frank Baum's Oz series. It was the first in which Baum was clearly intending a series of Oz books. Where at the end of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Dorothy's silver shoes were lost in the desert, at the end of Ozma of Oz, Glinda tells her the magic belt she could wish herself home with would likewise be lost, and Dorothy carefully gives it to Princess Ozma, in order that she might go home but the magic still be preserved, and they arrange that Ozma ...
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Ozma of Oz

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Overview

Ozma of Oz, published on July 29, 1907, was the third book of L. Frank Baum's Oz series. It was the first in which Baum was clearly intending a series of Oz books. Where at the end of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Dorothy's silver shoes were lost in the desert, at the end of Ozma of Oz, Glinda tells her the magic belt she could wish herself home with would likewise be lost, and Dorothy carefully gives it to Princess Ozma, in order that she might go home but the magic still be preserved, and they arrange that Ozma will use it to wish Dorothy back to Oz at need.
It is also the first book where the majority of the action takes place outside of the Land of Oz. Only the final two chapters take place in Oz itself. This reflects a subtle change in theme: in the first book, Oz is the dangerous land through which Dorothy must win her way back to Kansas; in the third, Oz is the end and aim of the book. Dorothy's desire to return home is not as desperate as in the first book, and it is her uncle's need for her rather than hers for him that makes her return.
It was illustrated throughout in color by artist John R. Neill.
The book bore the following dedication: "To all the boys and girls who read my stories - and especially to the Dorothys - this book is lovingly dedicated."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781161447170
  • Publisher: Kessinger Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 5/23/2010
  • Pages: 122
  • Product dimensions: 0.31 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 7.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Born in New York in 1856, Frank Baum had his first best-selling children's book with 1899's Father Goose, His Book. The following year, Baum scored an even bigger hit with The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and went on to write 13 more Oz books before his death in 1919. His stories have formed the basis for such popular films as The Wizard of Oz (1939) and Oz the Great and Powerful (2013).

Lyman Frank Baum was born on May 15, 1856, in Chittenango, New York. In 1900, Frank Baum wrote one of the most famous works of children's literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, later known as The Wizard of Oz. He enjoyed a comfortable upbringing as the son of a barrel factory owner who also had some success in the oil business. Named "Lyman" after an uncle, Baum hated his first name and chose to be called by his middle name "Frank" instead.

Baum's education began with tutors at home in his early years. At the age of 12, he went to the Peekskill Military Academy. Baum left the school after a health crisis two years later, apparently suffering from some type of heart condition. Never earning a high school degree, he spent his early adulthood exploring his interest in acting and writing for the stage.

Biography

Dorothy, Toto, the Scarecrow, Aunt Em -- where would our national psyche be without The Wonderful Wizard of Oz? L. Frank Baum, who created a story with an indelible, sometimes haunting impression on so many people, led a life that had a fairy-tale quality of its own.

Baum was born in 1856 to a family that had made a fortune in the oil business. Because he had a heart condition, his parents arranged for him to be tutored privately at the family’s Syracuse estate, “Roselawn.” As an adult, though, Baum flourished and failed at a dizzying variety of ventures, from writing plays to a stint with his family’s medicinal oil business (where he produced a potion called “Baum’s Castorine”), to managing a general store, to editing the Aberdeen Pioneer in Aberdeen, South Dakota. In 1897, following his mother-in-law’s advice, Baum wrote down the stories that he told his children. The firm of Way & Williams published the stories under the title Mother Goose in Prose, with illustrations by Maxfield Parrish, and Baum’s career as a writer was launched.

With the publication of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz in 1900, Baum gained instant success. The book, lavishly produced and featuring voluptuous illustrations by William Wallace Denslow, was the bestselling children’s book of the year. It also set a new standard for children’s literature. As a commentator for the September 8, 1900 New York Times described it, “The crudeness that was characteristic of the oldtime publications...would now be enough to cause the modern child to yell with rage and vigor...” The reviewer praised the book’s sheer entertainment value (its “bright and joyous atmosphere”) and likened it to The Story of the Three Bears for its enduring value. As the film industry emerged in the following years, few books were as manifestly destined for adaptation, and although it took almost four decades for a movie studio to translate Baum’s vision to film, the 1939 film did for the movies what Baum’s book had done for children’s literature: that is, raised the imaginative and technical bar higher than it had been before.

The loss of parents, the inevitable voyage toward independence, the yearning for home -- in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Baum touched upon a child’s primal experiences while providing a rousing story of adventure. As his health declined, Baum continued the series with 14 more Oz books (his publisher commissioned more by other authors after his death), but none had quite the effect on the reading public that the first one did. Baum died from complications of a stroke in 1919.

Good To Know

Baum founded the National Association of Window Trimmers and published a magazine for the window-trimming trade – he also raised exotic chickens.

Buam was married to Maud Gage, a daughter of the famous women’s rights advocate Matilda Joslyn Gage.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Floyd Akers, Laura Bancroft, George Brooks, Edith Van Dyne, Schuyler Staunton, John Estes Cooke, Suzanne Metcalf, Louis F. Baum, Lyman Frank Baum (full name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      May 15, 1856
    2. Place of Birth:
      Chittenango, New York
    1. Date of Death:
      May 6, 1919
    2. Place of Death:
      Hollywood, California

Read an Excerpt

Ozma of Oz


By L. Frank Baum

Kessinger Publishing

Copyright © 2004 L. Frank Baum
All right reserved.

ISBN: 1419139878

The Girl in the Chicken Coop

The wind blew hard and joggled the water of the ocean, sending ripples across its surface. Then the wind pushed the edges of the ripples until they became waves, and shoved the waves around until they became billows. The billows rolled dreadfully high: higher even than the tops of houses. Some of them, indeed rolled as high as the tops of tall trees, and seemed like mountains; and the gulfs between the breat billows were like deep valleys.

All this mad dashing and splashing of the waters of the big ocean, which the mischievouswind caused without any good reason whatever, resulted in a terrible storm, and a storm on the ocean is liable to cut many queer pranks and do a lot of damage.

At the time the wind began to blow, a ship was sailing far out upon the waters. When the waves began to tumble and toss and to grow bigger and bigger the ship rolled up and down, and tipped sidewise -- first one way and then the other -- and was jostled around so roughly that even the sailor-men had to hold fast to the ropes and railings to keep themselves from being swept away by the wind or pitched headlong into the sea.

And the clouds were so thick in the sky that the sunlight couldn't get through them; so that the day grew dark as night, which added to theterrors of the storm.

The Captain of the ship was not afraid, because he had seen storms before, and had sailed his ship through them in safety; but he knew that his passengers would be in danger if they tried to stay on deck, so he put them all into the cabin and told them to stay there until after the storm was over, and to keep brave hearts and not be scared, and all would be well with them.

Now, among these passengers was a little Kansas girl named Dorothy Gale, who was going with hey Uncle Henry to Australia, to visit some relatives they had never before seen. Uncle Henry, you must know, was not very well, because he had been working so hard on his Kansas farm that his health had given way and left him weak and nervous. So he left Aunt Em at home to watch after the hired men and to take care of the farm, while he traveled far away to Australia to visit his cousins and have a good rest.

Dorothy was eager to go with him on this journey, and Uncle Henry thought she would be good company and help cheer him up; so he decided to take her along. The little girl was quite an experienced traveller, for she had once been carried by a cyclone as far away from home as the marvelous Land of Oz, and she had met with a good many adventures in that strange country before she managed to get back to Kansas again. So she warn't easily frightened, whatever happened, and when the wind began to howl and whistle, and the waves began to tumble and toss, our little girl didn't mind the uproar the least bit.

"0f course we'll have to stay in the cabin," she said to Uncle Henry and the other passengers, "and keep as quiet as possible until the storm is over.

For the Captain says if we go on deck we may be blown overboard."

No one wanted to risk such an accident as that, you may be sure; so all the passengers stayed huddled up in the dark cabin, listening to the shrieking of the storm and the creaking of the masts and rigging and trying to keep from bumping into one another when the ship tipped sidewise.

Dorothy had almost fallen asleep when she was aroused with a start to find that Uncle Henry was missing. She couldn't imagine where he had gone, and as he was not very strong she began to worry about him, and to fear he might have been careless enough to go on deck. I n that case he would be in great danger unless he instantly came down again.

The fact was that Uncle Henry had gone to lie down in his little sleeping-berth, but Dorothy did not know that. She only remembered that Aunt Em had cautioned her to take good care of her uncle, so at once she decided to go on deck and find him, in spite of the fact that the tempest was now worse than ever, and the ship was plunging in a really dreadful manner. Indeed, the little girl found it was as much as she could do to mount the stairs to the deck, and as soon as she got there the wind struck her so fiercely that it almost tore away the skirts of her dress. Yet Dorothy felt a sort of joyous excitement in defying the storm, and while she held fast to the railing she peered around through the gloom and thought she saw the dim form of a man clinging to a mast not faraway from her. This might be her uncle, so she called as loudly as she could:

"Uncle Henry! Uncle Henry!"

But the wind screeched and howled so madly that she scarce heard her own voice, and the man certainly failed to hear her, for he did not move.

Dorothy decided she must go to him; so she made a dash forward, during a lull in the storm, to where a big square chicken-coop had been lashed to the deck with ropes. She reached this place in safety, but no sooner had she seized fast hold of the slats of the big box in which the chickens were kept than the wind, as if enraged because the little girl dared to resist its power, suddenly redoubled its fury. With a scream like that of an angry giant it tore away the ropes that held the coop and lifted it high into the air, with Dorothy still clinging to the slats.



Continues...


Excerpted from Ozma of Oz by L. Frank Baum Copyright © 2004 by L. Frank Baum. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 30 )
Rating Distribution

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(17)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 30 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2012

    A-W-E-S-O-M-E awesome, awesome TOTALLY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    EXELENT book!
    Read it!

    P.S. and I MEAN IT!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2008

    A reviewer

    Ozma of Oz is a MUST READ. Children and adults alike will love Ozma of Oz. The full color illustrations are amazing. I also read The Wizard of Oz, and much prefer this installation in the Oz series. New characters like Princess Langwidere, a head collecting ruler, Tik Tok, the mechanical man, and Ozma are delightful and dynamic. Dorothy's adventure in this book is far more interesting, with more cliff hanger moments and evil tyrant, the Gnome King. Overall this book is far more intricate and includes handfulls of new characters and new stories that make the land of Oz that much more wonderful.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2014

    Comic Comic?

    Is this the comic version?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2013

    Like

    ?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2013

    Highly recommended book!

    I loved the book, I now cannot wait to see the movie!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2013

    Digitized by google

    That phrse is on every couple pages and really takes you out of the book. Other thsn that its great.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2012

    Sorry...

    95 cents, not 95¿

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  • Posted May 26, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Very Imaginative

    Ozma of Oz by L. Frank Baum is the third story in the fic­tional series tak­ing place in the land of Oz. While cer­tainly not as pop­u­lar the first story in the series the rest are very imag­i­na­tiveas well.

    on a vaca­tion from Kansas to Aus­tralia, Uncle Henry and his niece Dorothy Gale are caught in a fierce storm which throws Dorothy off the ship. Dorothy finds her­self in a crate with Bil­lina, a yel­low hen.

    As the sur­vivors wash ashore, Dorothy dis­cov­ers that Bil­lina can talk and guess they are in a”fairy coun­try” but not Oz because of the seashore. Soon they meet Tik-Tok, a mechan­i­cal man and go to the Land of Ev. There our trav­el­ers meet Ozma, the Tin Woods­man, the Cow­ardly Lion, The Scare­crow as well as the Hun­gry Tiger who are there also to res­cue the royal family.

    Ozma of Oz by L. Frank Baum is less dark then the pre­vi­ous books, more fairy tale like but all fun­nier and less annoy­ing. I loved the parts where Ozma’s army, which con­sisted of many offi­cers but only one solider, was part of. From some rea­son that struck me as hillerious.

    I have to say that the rea­son I enjoyed Ozma of Oz more than the pre­vi­ous two is because the nar­ra­tive is more stream­lined. There are less side sto­ries and bet­ter focus on a sin­gle goal which is more tan­gi­ble than just an idea (“home”).

    Also, there is less chau­vin­ism and racism than the pre­vi­ous books, espe­cially book 2 The Mar­velous Land of Oz. The char­ac­ters, espe­cially the female ones, are no-nonsense and say what they mean straight and to the point.

    This is a fun read, short and worth the time spent.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2011

    ?

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 25, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    Best book ever!

    I love the whole Wizard of Oz series and I love L.Frank Baum too! This is a wonderful book full of "Nomes", princesses, giants, armies, machines and more! I think everyone should read it!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2013

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    Posted December 1, 2008

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    Posted December 23, 2009

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    Posted May 11, 2010

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    Posted April 22, 2009

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    Posted February 7, 2010

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    Posted August 15, 2013

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    Posted October 10, 2009

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