Pablo Neruda: Poet of the People

( 1 )

Overview

Once there was a little boy named Neftalí who loved wild things wildly and quiet things quietly. From the moment he could talk, he surrounded himself with words. Neftalí discovered the magic between the pages of books. When he was sixteen, he began publishing his poems as Pablo Neruda.

Pablo wrote poems about the things he loved—things made by his friends in the café, things found at the marketplace, and things he saw in nature. He wrote about the people of Chile and their ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (15) from $1.99   
  • New (9) from $9.60   
  • Used (6) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Once there was a little boy named Neftalí who loved wild things wildly and quiet things quietly. From the moment he could talk, he surrounded himself with words. Neftalí discovered the magic between the pages of books. When he was sixteen, he began publishing his poems as Pablo Neruda.

Pablo wrote poems about the things he loved—things made by his friends in the café, things found at the marketplace, and things he saw in nature. He wrote about the people of Chile and their stories of struggle. Because above all things and above all words, Pablo Neruda loved people.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This gentle tribute to Chilean poet Neruda explores his formative experiences, from searching for "beetles and birds' eggs" in the forest to discovering his love for books. Paschkis incorporates Spanish and English words into her organic, stylized compositions (the opening scene features a literal river of words), while Brown lyrically chronicles Neruda's poetic subjects ("He wrote about buttons and feathers and shoes and hats. He wrote about velvet cloth the color of the sea") and highlights his devotion to the poor and suffering. Readers may not gain a real sense of Neruda's work from this collaboration, but Brown and Paschkis paint a compelling portrait of a man who saw the world as a joyful, complex, and beautiful poem waiting to be unveiled. Ages 1–4. (Mar.)
From the Publisher
 “A visual and thematic stunner.” —Kirkus Reviews, Starred Review

“Brown and Paschkis paint a compelling portrait of a man who saw the world as a joyful, complex, and beautiful poem waiting to be unveiled.” —Publishers Weekly

“Brown’s succinct lines read like a poem themselves, and they emphasize the infinite places writers find inspiration, from seashores to coal mines to the faces of people they love.” —Booklist

“Impassioned (story)telling combine with Paschkis’s vibrant, decorative style for a book high in child appeal.” —School Library Journal

“It all adds up to an intriguing taste of Neruda’s themes and concerns, winningly dramatized in the splendor of Paschkis’s illustrations.” —Horn Book Magazine

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
This story of the life of the Chilean poet and Nobel Prize winner known as Pablo Neruda begins in his boyhood. He loves nature but also surrounds himself with words and books. He decides to become a writer, publishing poems when he is still a teenager, leaving behind his original name, Neftali, for his pseudonym. He moves to Santiago, makes many friends, and writes poems about various things from what he sees in the market to those in nature, from stones from the mountain to crabs on the beach. He has many homes, including one in Spain. His love of all people leads him to support struggling workers. He must leave Chile to avoid arrest. But his "voice was heard across nations and oceans;" he is called "the poet of the people." Paschkis visualizes the simply told narrative with stylized figures and objects equally simply defined. They occupy the spaces above the caption-like text. Of major importance are the streams or ribbons of color that flow around figures and across pages. They bear words: geographic names, nouns in English and Spanish, titles of poems and books, etc. Perhaps we are being challenged to connect these isolated words into some part of the narrative. Among these on the jacket is "Neftali." Additional notes by the author include a list of some of Neruda's poetry and additional resources. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3—This introduction to Chile's Nobel Prize-winning poet celebrates the glorious qualities of words as it describes Neruda's delight in them. On the cover, a young Neftalí reaches out, and blue and green rivulets of Spanish and English swirl from his hand toward readers: "Luminescent/Sense/Nonsense/Nets/Neftalí/If/Laughter/La Luz/Azul/All." As Brown provides an overview of Neruda's life from childhood and his fortuitous tutelage under Gabriela Mistral through the activism that forced him to flee from home as an adult, and Paschkis paints words on ferns, skies, roads, and banners that surround and relate to the action depicted. While the boy shares a horseback ride with a friend, the leaves on the vine overhead read: "Ayer/Eye/Ojo/Why/Hoja/Sky/Hope/Open." Other dynamic spreads relate to the poet's collections of ships in bottles and rocks or his love of opposites and the beach. The final scene depicts the titles of his poems in a variety of languages as the author explains his international acclaim. The book concludes with a brief author's note about the poet. The attributes that Brown has selected to share and her simple, but impassioned telling combine with Paschkis's vibrant, decorative style for a book high in child appeal. Pair it with Roni Schotter's The Boy Who Loved Words (Random, 2006) or, for older children who are swept up in the particular allure of Neruda's life and poetry, share Pam Muñoz Ryan's The Dreamer (Scholastic, 2010).—Wendy Lukehart, Washington DC Public Library
Kirkus Reviews - Kikus Reviews

More than a heartwarming portrait of Chile's most revered poet, this splendid tribute to Pablo Neruda animates his global appeal with a visceral immediacy capable of seducing readers of any age. Brown's spare descriptions of the little boy who "loved wild things wildly and quiet things quietly" and grew to write poems about "velvet cloth the color of the sea," contrasts wonderfully with Paschkis' lush, earth-toned paintings that teem with the florid stream of words and images populating the inner world of the budding poetic consciousness. The word-laden illustrations, sporting names of authors in tree bark or swirling adjectives in the hollow of the moon, are a constant throughout the volume, spilling from Spanish to English, sound to sense—"arc oro orange azure azul ample apple simple timber timbre..."—and back again, with as great a depiction of creative processing as one's likely to see. At pains to depict Neruda above all as "a poet of the people," Brown encourages young readers to notice the suggestive world around them and then render it for others through language. She moves seamlessly from describing Neruda's poetic artistry to political activism, showing how an appreciation for the stones of Chile "tumbling down the mountaintops" could lead to his understanding of their value in "the hands of the stonecutters." A visual and thematic stunner. (author's note, bibliography)(Picture book. 4-11)

Kirkus Reviews

More than a heartwarming portrait of Chile's most revered poet, this splendid tribute to Pablo Neruda animates his global appeal with a visceral immediacy capable of seducing readers of any age. Brown's spare descriptions of the little boy who "loved wild things wildly and quiet things quietly" and grew to write poems about "velvet cloth the color of the sea," contrasts wonderfully with Paschkis' lush, earth-toned paintings that teem with the florid stream of words and images populating the inner world of the budding poetic consciousness. The word-laden illustrations, sporting names of authors in tree bark or swirling adjectives in the hollow of the moon, are a constant throughout the volume, spilling from Spanish to English, sound to sense—"arc oro orange azure azul ample apple simple timber timbre..."—and back again, with as great a depiction of creative processing as one's likely to see. At pains to depict Neruda above all as "a poet of the people," Brown encourages young readers to notice the suggestive world around them and then render it for others through language. She moves seamlessly from describing Neruda's poetic artistry to political activism, showing how an appreciation for the stones of Chile "tumbling down the mountaintops" could lead to his understanding of their value in "the hands of the stonecutters." A visual and thematic stunner. (author's note, bibliography)(Picture book. 4-11)

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780805091984
  • Publisher: Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
  • Publication date: 3/29/2011
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 716,526
  • Age range: 6 - 9 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 11.20 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Monica Brown is the author of several bilingual books for children inspired by her Peruvian-American heritage. She is a recipient of the Américas Award for Children’s Literature and a professor of English at Northern Arizona University.

www.monicabrown.net

Julie Paschkis has illustrated many award-winning books, including Glass Slipper, Gold Sandal: A Worldwide Cinderella by Paul Fleischman and Through Georgia’s Eyes by Rachel Rodríguez. For this book, Julie traveled to Chile to see Neruda’s home and the people that inspired him.

www.juliepaschkis.com

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 24, 2012

    No dialogue...creates dialogue?

    This book was not as entertaining as I thought it would be. At the same time, it was entertaining. I guess I would have to say that the fact that this book has absolutely no dialogue, it even lost my attention and the attention of my two year old. I am not sure if even a second grader would be able to keep interest in this book. Having said that, the illustrations are absolutely beautiful and creative. The book is about Pablo Neruda and words are hidden in the illustrations, they are words of different languages and they are words that go along with the pictures. it is brilliant. Even though this book has no dialogue, I think the illustrations could create dialogue in a bilingual classroom especially, and even in a non bilingual classroom that has english language learners in the classroom. Above all, this book is very informative. I even learned about the life of Pablo Neruda in this book and the illustrations are a lot of fun.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)