Pacific Crossing

( 3 )

Overview

In a sequel to Gary Soto's Taking Sides, young Lincoln and Tony take up the martial art of Kempo and, much to their surprise, are selected as exchange students to Japan. After staying with a Japanese family, Lincoln learns that his Japanese family, and people everywhere, are not much different from his family in California.

Fourteen-year-old Mexican American Lincoln Mendoza spends a summer with a host family in Japan, encountering ...

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Overview

In a sequel to Gary Soto's Taking Sides, young Lincoln and Tony take up the martial art of Kempo and, much to their surprise, are selected as exchange students to Japan. After staying with a Japanese family, Lincoln learns that his Japanese family, and people everywhere, are not much different from his family in California.

Fourteen-year-old Mexican American Lincoln Mendoza spends a summer with a host family in Japan, encountering new experiences and making new friends.

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Editorial Reviews

Stephanie Zvirin
In this sequel to "Taking Sides" , Soto writes about open minds, not closed ones, as he turns once more to multicultural themes. Lincoln Mendoza, now happily out of the suburbs, is selected for a summer exchange program to Japan, where he will continue the martial arts training he began in San Francisco. Lincoln discovers that Mr. and Mrs. Ono and their son, Mitsuo--his host family--are congenial guardians and as eager to learn about the U.S. and his Mexican American heritage as 14-year-old Lincoln is to learn about Japan. Their cultural collisions are affable and gently humorous, as when Lincoln, who's not a good cook, prepares frijoles for his "family," and when he visits the "sento", a men's public bath, for the first time. The episodic plot is not particularly dramatic, except for one incident, when Lincoln, who can't drive, must rush an ailing Mr. Ono to the hospital. It's the language that seems to punch things up: Soto uses a heroic combination of contemporary American slang ("fresh," "bad") and Spanish and Japanese terms likely to have readers making good use of the book's two glossaries. Yet the strange word mix works more often than not; the story, though slight, is warm and winning; and its setting is strikingly authentic.
From the Publisher
"The author's keen understanding . . . produces a story that is both touching and enlightening."—Publishers Weekly
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780152591878
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 10/1/1992
  • Edition description: 1
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 144
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 8.61 (h) x 0.73 (d)

Meet the Author

Gary Soto 's first book for young readers, Baseball in April and Other Stories, won the California Library Association's Beatty Award and was named an ALA Best Book for Young Adults. He has since published many novels, short stories, plays, and poetry collections for adults and young people. He lives in Berkeley, California. Visit his website at www.garysoto.com .

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 3 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 3, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Good Way For Students to Learn about Other Cultures.

    Pacific Crossing is a well written book that keeps students' interest. It is about 2 hispanic boys who get the opportunity to live with families in Japan. It has an interesting story line in which one of the boys helps save the life of one of the members of the Japanese family with which he is living. While in Japan, the boys learn a lot about Japanese culture. To me, the most important lesson learned was the value of respect for elders. Since the story is about 2 hispanic students, the reader also learns about some Hispanic customs, as the boys share their customs with their host families. This book is a great read for 4th and 5th graders. The characters are very real. It is interesting, educational, a quick read, and introduces students to the author, Gary Soto, who has written several books that kids will enjoy.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2004

    Why did I waste my time?

    This was a horrible book and a terrible waste of time...

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2002

    I think that this book would be a good book for kids that are between ages 9-12

    I enjoyed this book because it showed how Gary Soto managed to get through life doing Kempo and playing with his friends, and teaching then something about it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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