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Paddy's Lament, Ireland 1846-1847: Prelude to Hatred
     

Paddy's Lament, Ireland 1846-1847: Prelude to Hatred

4.5 4
by Thomas Gallagher
 

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Ireland in the mid-1800s was primarily a population of peasants, forced to live on a single, moderately nutritious crop: potatoes. Suddenly, in 1846, an unknown and uncontrollable disease turned the potato crop to inedible slime, and all Ireland was threatened. Index.

Overview


Ireland in the mid-1800s was primarily a population of peasants, forced to live on a single, moderately nutritious crop: potatoes. Suddenly, in 1846, an unknown and uncontrollable disease turned the potato crop to inedible slime, and all Ireland was threatened. Index.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780156707008
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
05/28/1987
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
372
Sales rank:
221,472
Product dimensions:
5.31(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.91(d)

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Paddy's Lament, Ireland 1846-1847: Prelude to Hatred 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
You can go through life and if you are fortunate you will come across something that will change your views and maybe even your life. This book is that something. As an english man who was in Birmingham during the 1973 Pub bombings I was initially very angered by the act and for several years was very anti Irish. A few years later I visited Dublin and purchased this book. While reading it I was completely moved to tears on so many occassions. What happened to the Irish was nothing more than as one reviewer stated 'An attempt by the Brits at Total Genocide'. The famine was not an Irish famine it was the failure of the potato crop right across Europe. The Brits turned it into the Irish famine as their solution to the Irish problem. Shame on them for they sowed the seeds to a problem that justifiably exists today. They reduced the Irish population from its existing 8 million in the 1800s to its existing 4 million today by its policy of starvation and forced exile. However in doing so they enriched the world with Irish exiles who brought their humor their skills and their love of life. On today March 17th if you have even a little bit of Irish in you, hold your head high for you are indeed the chosen people.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Just as Sinead O'Connor says in one of her songs, 'There never was one; there was no famine.' This book shows why such a proud race, The Celtic race, has such a deep seeded hostility towards 'The Crown'. The Irish need to protect their land, history, language, and especially their ancient bloodlines that had been (and to this day are threatened)to be eliminated from existence. The English tried back in 1846 and were almost successful in making the Irish extinct. The English Government was no better than Hitler and his lackies. The key word in this wonderful book is 'Eventual mass annihilation, complete and utter Genocide.'
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago