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Pages of Day and Night
     

Pages of Day and Night

5.0 1
by Adonis, Samuel Hazo (Translator)
 

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Calling poetry a "question that begets another question," Adonis sets into motion this stream of unending inquiry with difficult questions about exile, identity, language, politics, and religion. Repeatedly mentioned as a possible Nobel laureate, Adonis is a leading figure in twentieth-century Arabic poetry.

Restless and relentless, Adonis explores the pain and

Overview

Calling poetry a "question that begets another question," Adonis sets into motion this stream of unending inquiry with difficult questions about exile, identity, language, politics, and religion. Repeatedly mentioned as a possible Nobel laureate, Adonis is a leading figure in twentieth-century Arabic poetry.

Restless and relentless, Adonis explores the pain and otherness of exile, a state so complete that absence replaces identity and becomes the exile's only presence. Exile can take many forms for the Arabic poet, who must practice his craft as an outsider, separated not only from the nation of his birth but from his own language; in the present as in the past, that exile can mean censorship, banishment, or death. Through these poems, Adonis gives an exquisite voice to the silence of absence.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"This is an immensely satisfying new collection of poems—continuing the poet's restless, metaphysical exploration into 'everything strange.'" —Publishers Weekly

"[Adonis] writes from a profound understanding of and love for the Arabic culture from which he has been politically exiled. His poems are passionate, tragic, lyrical, evocative. . . . The translations, unlike many, stand on their own as poems."

 —Library Journal

Publishers Weekly
This is an immensely satisfying . . . collection of poems—continuing the poet's restless, metaphysical exploration into 'everything strange.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780810160811
Publisher:
Northwestern University Press
Publication date:
10/28/2000
Pages:
108
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.50(d)

Meet the Author

Adonis was born 'Ali Ahmad Sa'id in 1930 in Syria. He has taught at the Université de la Sorbonne-Nouvelle, the Collège de France, Georgetown University, and the University of Geneva. A poet, an editor, a translator, and a literary critic, Adonis is the author of more than twenty books, including The Stage and the Mirrors, A Tomb for New York, and The Transformation of the Lover.

Samuel Hazo is the McAnulty Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Duquesne University. A widely published poet, fiction writer, essayist, and translator, Hazo was named Pennsylvania's first state poet in 1993. His most recent works are the poetry collection As They Sail and the novel Stills.

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Pages of Day and Night 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
There is a transcendent kinship pervading the poetry of exile, one running from culture to culture, and ¿ as Adonis shows us ¿ from Adam, 'Choking quietly / with pain' (27), right up to the current `harvest of unborn children' (5). As he states in his preface, 'Absence and exile constitute the only presence' (xiv). Yet his is no insipid ornament of emotion; consider, 'The Stage and the Mirrors,': 'Suddenly I felt akin / to lightning / or a message / scratched in dust' (21); or, in 'The Sleep of Hands,': Today I offer my palms / to dead lands and muted / streets' (3). What Adonis shows us so intensely through these lines is a world redolent of broken lives, and journeys that never end, laid bare through an erudite and mystical poignancy. Here we find a link to the Hermetic poets of the early 20th century, especially Giuseppe Ungaretti, and an affinity with the best exile poets of Lithuania. Moreover, Adonis is a poet whose experience in the world underscores exile's broader witness. As fellow Arab poet Hadrat Ali wrote, 'Loss of a beloved is exile.' Such words serve as synecdoche for the profound loss and dispossession that Adonis speaks to. At the end of the book is a translation of Adonis' essay 'Poetry and Apolitical Culture.' One hopes, in the future, to see more English language essays of his poetics and criticism. Adonis is a perfect companion to the work of fellow Arab poets, particularly Mahmud Darwish and Sa'di Yusef.