Pain and Its Relief Without Addiction: Clinical Issues in the Use of Opioids and Other Analgesics / Edition 2

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Overview

Pain and Its Relief Without Addiction will help people in pain understand why their pain is not always adequately relieved, as well as help reverse the failure of current medical practice to routinely alleviate pain. As noted by a 1992 publication of the United States Department of Health Services, this devastating trend contributes to unnecessary discomfort, longer recovery periods, and compromised patient outcomes. By reading this book, frustrated physicians and, perhaps more importantly, persons in pain can acquire a better understanding of the nature of pain, its connection to the emotions and psychological state of patients, and the impact particular drugs have on the body; this will facilitate relief from pain among a higher percentage of the population.

Opioid analgesics comprise many of the chapters in Pain and Its Relief Without Addiction. Author Barry Stimmel, MD, describes the principles to be followed in prescribing opioid analgesics to relieve pain while maintaining one’s daily activities without any limitation in function. The available opioids are described, and the differences between them are reviewed to allow you—as a physician, health care provider, or even a patient—to gain a better insight into the one(s) to use for both acute and chronic pain states. The point that is emphasized is that dependency on an analgesic to relieve pain is no different than dependency on medications to lower blood pressure, prevent heart attacks, treat diabetes, etc. What should be avoided is “addiction,” a condition where function is impaired rather than enhanced.

Pain and Its Relief Without Addiction is a guidebook designed to assist physicians and other health professionals in developing a practical approach to pain management and to give patients a fuller understanding of their pain. You’ll gain specific information about:

  • management of acute and chronic pain
  • pain in children
  • pain and cancer
  • pain and AIDS
  • psychological support of persons in pain
  • theories of pain perception
  • the anatomy of pain

    In Pain and Its Relief Without Addiction, you’ll learn the basic concepts of drug dependence, tolerance, and withdrawal, the pharmacological actions and side effects of drugs used to provide analgesia, and the fundamental steps to be taken in proper pharmacological treatment of pain. The book produces more effective and more informed communication among physicians, other health professionals, and patients so that together they can achieve better pain relief. As Pain and Its Relief Without Addiction illustrates, it is crucial that both patients and physicians understand clearly the terms describing drug use and the behavioral, biochemical, and cellular concepts underlying dependence, tolerance, and withdrawal. Finally, you will acquire a knowledge of all the potential causes of pain and the appropriate steps for intervention.

    Medical students, new practitioners, and those wishing to reconsider their approaches to pain management will benefit from the book’s coverage of general principles for pain control, the use of drug combinations to provide the most effective relief, methods for treating pain in different populations (such as the elderly and persons with chronic medical conditions), and alternative options for failed treatment. The scope of Pain and Its Relief Without Addiction reaches from nonprescription medications, such as aspirin, to NSAIDS, like ibuprofen, to narcotic analgesics to stimulants such as amphetamines and caffeine. It is the most comprehensive book available on various drugs, their desired effects and side effects, and their use to alleviate pain.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Barry Egener, MD (Oregon Health and Science University)
Description: This is a comprehensive handbook for the pharmacologic treatment of pain. As well as offering practical suggestions for using traditional opiate and nonopiate analgesics, it discusses their potentiators, adjunctive therapies, and drugs with purported but unestablished efficacy, such as marijuana. Not only ignorance, but also attitudes and a misguided sense of morality are barriers to the relief of pain. This book combats all three by addressing their cognitive underpinnings. The book's major strength is the breadth of its treatment of the subject. It combines conceptual principles of pain management, addiction, and physiology with the details of basic anatomy, pharmacology, inappropriate prescribing, and special populations necessary for the rational treatment of pain.
Purpose: The purpose is to lessen the burden of unrelieved pain.
Audience: Because of the complex social issues that bear on the treatment of pain, this second edition's broad audience is the physician, the healthcare team, and the public at large. This perspective is consistent with the emerging biopsychosocial concept of disease: the notion that illness affects not only the patient, but all those in relationship to the affected individual. The challenge of writing for such a diverse group is balancing breadth and depth, being comprehensive without pedantic detail. For the most part, the book succeeds. The physician will find all the details necessary to competently use any pain reliever; the patient will find an explanation for the choice, drug interactions, and side effects.
Features: The excellent organization, table of contents, and index make it a practical reference text. The references and brand names are current. There are numerous figures and tables, although many of the latter are simple lists.
Assessment: What I found most interesting is how the book juxtaposes what is known about the treatment of pain with how medicine and society use that knowledge. The sections on drug dependence, the effects of emotion on pain, unrelieved pain, and governmental regulation are particularly relevant to the question of why physician and patient often choose to leave pain unrelieved. Because the audience is broad, the reader may need to consult one of the references to elucidate a particular detail, such as why one should avoid the common practice of combining over-the-counter analgesics. This book is an excellent resource for practitioners and patients advocating a more rational approach to pain management.
Barry Egener
This is a comprehensive handbook for the pharmacologic treatment of pain. As well as offering practical suggestions for using traditional opiate and nonopiate analgesics, it discusses their potentiators, adjunctive therapies, and drugs with purported but unestablished efficacy, such as marijuana. Not only ignorance, but also attitudes and a misguided sense of morality are barriers to the relief of pain. This book combats all three by addressing their cognitive underpinnings. The book's major strength is the breadth of its treatment of the subject. It combines conceptual principles of pain management, addiction, and physiology with the details of basic anatomy, pharmacology, inappropriate prescribing, and special populations necessary for the rational treatment of pain. The purpose is to lessen the burden of unrelieved pain. Because of the complex social issues that bear on the treatment of pain, this second edition's broad audience is the physician, the healthcare team, and the public at large. This perspective is consistent with the emerging biopsychosocial concept of disease: the notion that illness affects not only the patient, but all those in relationship to the affected individual. The challenge of writing for such a diverse group is balancing breadth and depth, being comprehensive without pedantic detail. For the most part, the book succeeds. The physician will find all the details necessary to competently use any pain reliever; the patient will find an explanation for the choice, drug interactions, and side effects. The excellent organization, table of contents, and index make it a practical reference text. The references and brand names are current. There are numerousfigures and tables, although many of the latter are simple lists. What I found most interesting is how the book juxtaposes what is known about the treatment of pain with how medicine and society use that knowledge. The sections on drug dependence, the effects of emotion on pain, unrelieved pain, and governmental regulation are particularly relevant to the question of why physician and patient often choose to leave pain unrelieved. Because the audience is broad, the reader may need to consult one of the references to elucidate a particular detail, such as why one should avoid the common practice of combining over-the-counter analgesics. This book is an excellent resource for practitioners and patients advocating a more rational approach to pain management.

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780789001269
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 4/28/1997
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 434
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Table of Contents

Contents
I. Physiological Concepts of Pain and Dependence

  • The Anatomy of Pain
  • Neuroregulators and Pain
  • Basic Concepts of Dependence, Tolerance, and Withdrawal
  • The Effects of Emotion on Pain
  • II. Drugs Used to Relieve Pain
  • Nonnarcotic Analgesics and Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs
  • Narcotic (Opioid) Analgesics I: Narcotic Agonists
  • Narcotic Analgesics II: The Narcotic (Opioid) Agonists-Antagonists
  • The Stimulants
  • Barbiturates, Nonbarbiturate Hypnotics, and Minor Tranquilizers
  • The Major Tranquilizers
  • The Antidepressants
  • Marijuana
  • III. The Practical Management of Pain
  • General Principles of Pain Management
  • Management of Acute and Chronic Pain
  • Unrelieved Pain: The Role of the Physician
  • IV. Management of Pain in Special Populations
  • Pain Relief in Children and the Elderly
  • Relieving Pain in Malignant Disorders: The Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome and Persons With Cancer
  • Management of Pain in Special Populations: Persons Tolerant to or Dependent on Opioids
  • Index
  • Reference Notes Included
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