Painted Ladies (Spenser Series #38)
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Painted Ladies (Spenser Series #38)

3.6 163
by Robert B. Parker
     
 

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The brilliant new Spenser novel from the beloved New York Times-bestselling author Robert B. Parker.

Called upon by The Hammond Museum and renowned art scholar Dr. Ashton Prince, Spenser accepts his latest case: to provide protection during a ransom exchange-money for a stolen painting.

The case becomes personal when Spenser

Overview

The brilliant new Spenser novel from the beloved New York Times-bestselling author Robert B. Parker.

Called upon by The Hammond Museum and renowned art scholar Dr. Ashton Prince, Spenser accepts his latest case: to provide protection during a ransom exchange-money for a stolen painting.

The case becomes personal when Spenser fails to protect his client and the valuable painting remains stolen. Convinced that Ashton Prince played a bigger role than just ransom delivery boy, Spenser enters into a daring game of cat-and-mouse with the thieves. But this is a game he might not come out of alive...

Completed the year before he passed away, Painted Ladies is Spenser and Robert B. Parker at their electrifying best.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
At the start of the lackluster 38th Spenser novel from late MWA Grand Master Parker, the iconic Boston PI agrees to protect art historian Ashton Prince during the exchange for cash of a rare painting held for ransom, 17th-century Dutch artist Franz Hermenszoon’s Lady with a Finch. When a bomb kills Prince during the botched exchange, Spenser naturally plans to even the score. And naturally, Spenser’s probing--into the painting’s complex history, Prince’s twisted life, the museum that owned the painting--leads to violent reactions. Spenser’s habitual wisecracking often comes across as merely smart-alecky, but as always he backs the attitude with performance. While this crime thriller is short on the kind of grit and character that earned Parker (1932–2010) an Edgar Award and numerous Shamus nominations, fans should still relish this probably final opportunity to enjoy the inimitable Spenser, who made his debut in 1973’s The Godwulf Manuscript. (Oct.)
Library Journal
Parker died this past January, making this the last in his long-running and popular series featuring wisecracking Boston PI Spenser. Like the series debut, The Godwulf Manuscript, the plot involves a missing artifact, a murder, and Spenser's determination to do the job he set out to do no matter who or what stands in his way. The missing artifact here is a stolen painting, and Spenser's client is an art professor who wants protection while ransoming it. Things, of course, are not quite what they seem, and the path to resolution is full of twists, betrayals, secrets, and good intentions gone horribly wrong. Parker's dialog is as sharp and snappy as ever. VERDICT Fans of the series and of mystery fiction in general will enjoy one last outing with Spenser, longtime lover Susan, and Pearl the Wonder Dog. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 5/1/10.]—Bradley A. Scott, Texas A&M Univ., Corpus Christi
Kirkus Reviews

Spenser's last case.

The opening sequence, in which Spenser (The Professional,2009, etc.)makes a monkey out of a college professor who clearly needs him more than Spenser needs the professor, hearkens back to the Boston private eye's very first case (The Godwulf Manuscript, 1973). This time, however, Parker adds a pleasing twist. As forensic art consultant and all-around twit Dr. Ashton Prince returns from his rendezvous with the thieves ransoming the 17th-century canvas Lady with a Finch to the waiting Spenser, whom he'd hired to accompany him on the drop-off, the package he's picked up in exchange for the ransom explodes, killing him. Although Spenserfeels honor-bound to avenge his late client, nobody wants his help or is interested in talking to him, and the more he finds out about Prince, the less he likes him. Working patiently, Spenser breaks down the defenses of insurance-resolution specialist Winifred Minor; her daughter Missy, one of the many coeds Prince seems to have pursued; Prince's daffy widow, oh-so-sensitive poet Rosalind Wellington; and Morton Lloyd, attorney to the museum from which the painting was stolen. Only after several more people have died does he realize how tenaciously the painted lady's provenance is entangled in the Holocaust, so that the case becomes, as he tells his ladylove Dr. Susan Silverman, "the most Jewish thing I've ever dealt with."

The yawning gap between the customary attitudinizing and the serious issues the tale raises make this far from Spenser's finest hour, yet one no serious fan will think of missing.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399156854
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
10/05/2010
Series:
Spenser Series, #38
Pages:
304
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.20(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Robert B. Parker was the author of more than fifty books. He died in January 2010.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
September 17, 1932
Date of Death:
January 18, 2010
Place of Birth:
Springfield, Massachusetts
Place of Death:
Cambridge, Massachusetts
Education:
B.A. in English, Colby College, 1954; M.A., Ph. D. in English, Boston University, 1957, 1971
Website:
http://robertbparker.net/

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Painted Ladies 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 163 reviews.
oaksquare More than 1 year ago
Sure, a lot of this is like a lot of other Spenser books but that's why I like it. It is like spending time with a good old friend. Parker could always write dialog that makes you laugh out loud and there are bits in here that are as good as they get. I grew up in the Brighton Neighborhood of Boston and Parker gets Boston right like so few authors do. If you have not read other Spenser books you might want to start with an earlier one. If you like Parker, get a copy and read it.
bookgirlSE More than 1 year ago
although hawk is absent from this book, it's a great last spencer book. i've been a parker fan for years and he will be greatly missed.
FoggyNotion More than 1 year ago
This was short but I have read every Spenser and was not dissapointed in this one, if you are new to Robert B. Parker start with the Spenser series number 1 (The Godwulf Manuscript) and work your way up. There are not many authors that can say so much with so few words. If you like mysteries with some humor, not to much gore, and characters that become like family this series is for you
GeryNC More than 1 year ago
Robert B. Parker at his BEST !! AND Spencer at HIS BEST !! Agreat read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You're all idiots if you thibk you can defeat us. <br> ~ An Ananymous Bloodclanner ;)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Yall are poops if you think you can defeat Bloodclan.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Runs in. ((I like soulslayers post about bloodclan, do you think we should ignore them for that reasom?))
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
BC WILL RAID YOU.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am going back to camp for now
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well nither do you! I wana claw someone right about now....
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Watch
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ummmmm..........
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Too many he said, I said. It was distracting.  I never had this problem before in a Spencer novel.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sounds more like Jessie Stone than the Spensers of past.
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