Painting the Web

Overview

Do you think that only professionals with expensive tools and years of experience can work with web graphics? This guide tosses that notion into the trash bin.

Painting the Web is the first comprehensive book on web graphics to come along in years, and author Shelley Powers demonstrates how readers of any level can take advantage of the graphics and animation capabilities built into today's powerful browsers. She covers GIFs, JPEGs, and PNGs, raster and vector graphics, CSS, ...

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Painting the Web

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Overview

Do you think that only professionals with expensive tools and years of experience can work with web graphics? This guide tosses that notion into the trash bin.

Painting the Web is the first comprehensive book on web graphics to come along in years, and author Shelley Powers demonstrates how readers of any level can take advantage of the graphics and animation capabilities built into today's powerful browsers. She covers GIFs, JPEGs, and PNGs, raster and vector graphics, CSS, Ajax effects, the canvas objects, SVG, geographical applications, and more — everything that designers (and non-designers) use to literally paint the Web.

More importantly, Shelley's own love of web graphics shines through in every example. Not only can you master the many different techniques, you also can have fun doing it.

Topics in Painting the Web include:

  • GIF, JPEG, PNG, lossy versus lossless compression, color management, and optimization
  • Photo workflow, from camera to web page, including a review of photo editors, workflow tools, and RAW photo utilities
  • Tricks for best displaying your photos online
  • Non-photographic raster images (icons and logos), with step-by-step tutorials for creating popular "Web 2.0" effects like reflection, shiny buttons, inlays, and shadows
  • Vector graphics
  • An SVG tutorial, with examples of all the major components
  • Tips and tricks for using CSS
  • Interactive effects with Ajax such as accordions and fades
  • The canvas object implemented in most browsers
  • Geographical applications such as Google Maps and Yahoo Maps, with programming and non-programming examples
  • Visual effects such as forms and data displays in table or graphics
  • Web design for the non-designer

Graphics are not essential to the web experience, but they do make the difference between a site that's functional and one that's lively, compelling, and exciting. Whether you want to spruce up a website, use photos to annotate your stories, create hot graphics, or provide compelling displays for your data, this is the book for you.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780596515096
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 5/23/2008
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 656
  • Sales rank: 992,426
  • Product dimensions: 6.90 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Shelley Powers has been writing about technical topics—from the first release of Java to the latest graphics tools—for more than 12 years. Her recent books, all published with O'Reilly, have covered the semantic web, Ajax, JavaScript, Unix, and now the world of web graphics. She's an avid amateur photographer and web graphics aficionado who enjoys applying her latest experiments on her many web sites.

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Table of Contents

Preface;
How to Use This Book;
How This Book Is Organized;
Conventions Used in This Book;
Using Code Examples;
How to Contact Us;
Safari® Books Online;
Acknowledgments;
Chapter 1: You Must Have Fun;
1.1 What Was Good Enough for Grandpappy…;
1.2 Draw Me!;
1.3 $$$$$$$$$$$$;
1.4 Graphics: Taste Great, Less Filling;
1.5 It Hurts! Make It Stop!;
1.6 Web Graphics Hall of Shame;
1.7 On with the Wondrous Variety;
Chapter 2: Imagine;
2.1 Raster Graphics and RGB Color 101;
2.2 JPEG;
2.3 GIF: Lossless and Paletted;
2.4 PNG;
2.5 Images: Annotated, Embedded, and Optimized;
2.6 Steal This: Images, Copyright, and Hotlinking;
2.7 Image Storage;
Chapter 3: Photographs: From Camera to Web Page;
3.1 The Web Photographer's Workflow;
3.2 Working with RAW Images;
3.3 Editing Photos: Bending Light;
3.4 Color Match That Group: Optimization in Numbers;
3.5 It's Black and White and Not Red All Over;
3.6 The Illustrative Effect;
3.7 Knockouts and Extractions;
3.8 A Survey of Desktop Photo Editors;
3.9 Online Editors: Fauxto and Picnik;
3.10 Photo Workflow Software;
3.11 Photo Workflow: Camera to Web Redux;
Chapter 4: The Web As Frame;
4.1 The Art of Thumbnail Sizing;
4.2 The Creative Art of Thumbnails;
4.3 Expanding Thumbnails;
4.4 Embedding Photos: Condiment and Spice;
4.5 Plating Photos;
4.6 Generated Galleries and Slideshows;
4.7 Gallery Software on the Server;
4.8 A Bit of Code;
Chapter 5: Pop Graphics;
5.1 The Graphic Toolbox: Shapes, Layers, Gradient, and Blur;
5.2 Shiny Buttons:Gel, Wet, and Glass;
5.3 Badges and Bows: Beyond the Buttons;
5.4 Reflecting on Reflection, and Shadowing Revisited;
5.5 Reverse-Engineering Ideas;
5.6 Instant in Time: Screenshots;
Chapter 6: Vector This: Early Days and Markup;
6.1 WebCGM;
6.2 The 3Ds;
6.3 VML;
6.4 Hello SVG;
Chapter 7: SVG Bootcamp;
7.1 SVG Full, Basic, and Tiny;
7.2 Browser Support: Standoffish or Integrated;
7.3 The Structure of the SVG Space;
7.4 SVG Elements;
7.5 Paths, Patterns, and Markers;
7.6 Revisiting the Viewport and the viewBox;
7.7 Transformations;
7.8 SVG Tools;
7.9 Static SVG Secrets;
Chapter 8: CSS Über Zone;
8.1 Selector Magic;
8.2 CSS Tips and Tricks;
8.3 div Play Dough;
8.4 CSS Tools and Utilities;
Chapter 9: Design for the Non-Designer;
9.1 The Elements of Page Design;
9.2 Web Pages Are Like Ogres, and Ogres Have Layers;
9.3 Flexible Designs;
9.4 Colors: Make Your Page Happy, Make Your Page Sad;
9.5 Typography for the Page;
9.6 Web Design Tools;
9.7 Additional Readings;
Chapter 10: Dynamic Web Page Graphics;
10.1 The Quick Intro to the DOM;
10.2 Coloring Highlights;
10.3 Changing Class and Transparency;
10.4 Programming with Images;
10.5 Accordions: Smooshable Spaces;
Chapter 11: Canvassing;
11.1 Cross-Browser canvas Support and Microsoft's Silverlight;
11.2 canvas Basics;
11.3 Saving State;
11.4 Layering and Clipping;
11.5 canvas Effects;
Chapter 12: Dynamic SVG and canvas;
12.1 Embedded Animation;
12.2 Scripting SVG;
12.3 Embedded Scripting;
12.4 Animated Clock: The Hello World of Animated and Interactive SVG;
12.5 Scripting canvas: Zoom!;
Chapter 13: Image Magic: Programming and Power Tools;
13.1 Serving Up Photos: Insta-Slideshows;
13.2 Manipulate Images with PHP/GD;
13.3 Forget the Interface: The Magic of ImageMagick;
13.4 Programming with ImageMagick and IMagick;
Chapter 14: The Geo Zone;
14.1 Mapping with Google;
14.2 Yahoo!'s Maps;
14.3 Living Within the Geoweb;
Chapter 15: Like Peanut Butter and Jelly: Data and Graphics;
15.1 Graphs: Every Which Way but Static;
15.2 Mining Your Photos;
15.3 Rosy Glow of Completion;
15.4 One Last Look at Data and Visualization;
15.5 The data: URI;
15.6 At the End of This Rainbow;
Colophon;

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