Pairing Wine and Food: A Handbook for All Cuisines

Pairing Wine and Food: A Handbook for All Cuisines

by L. J. Johnson-Bell
     
 

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An authoritative guide that addresses not only the concepts of wine and food pairings in the context of modern cuisine, but also offers comprehensive, specific food-and-wine pairings, and a reverse index of foods that go with specific wines.See more details below

Overview

An authoritative guide that addresses not only the concepts of wine and food pairings in the context of modern cuisine, but also offers comprehensive, specific food-and-wine pairings, and a reverse index of foods that go with specific wines.

Editorial Reviews

Booklist
Much has been written about the interrelationships between food and wine. Johnson-Bell approaches the subject from the perspective of a consumer for whom wine is the central focus. The point of matching foods to wines is primarily one of personal taste, but there are some general guidelines to prevent unpleasant clashing of flavors. As the author points out, the growing popularity of non-European cuisines has made food-wine matching even more problematic. Nevertheless, there are some thoughtful ways to go about picking a wine to accompany those enchiladas or that pad thai. Johnson-Bell writes clearly about how food flavors affect the way wine is perceived and vice versa. For those who want simply some prescriptive advice, this book offers long lists of foods matched to appropriate wines. Her tables of wine names and the grapes that go into them are also useful for reference.
Foreword Magazine
The superlative precision provided in Pairing Wine and Food should serve to blur the divisiveness often found between foodies and grape nuts. At its best, the palate game (played by both food and wine lovers) requires the most honed tasting skills backed by a prodigious memory. Johnson-Bell has contributed a splendid resource for the novice and expert.
Library Journal
This compact and comprehensive work rejects the notion that pairing wine with food is as simplistic as matching red with meat and white with chicken. Rather, it is a dish's flavors--sweet, sour, spicy, and salty--that must guide wine selection. Using this premise, Johnson-Bell, a wine journalist and panel judge, has written a handy guide explaining the tastes and aromas of wine and food and how this knowledge enhances the enjoyment of both. While much of the material has been seen before--e.g., charts of wine smells and varietals--this book makes excellent and unique contributions: a fairly exhaustive cross-referencing of wines and their perfect gastronomical partners (including cheeses and mushrooms), a table matching herbs and spices with wines, and the admission that, in the final analysis, champagne goes with anything. Useful for everyone from beginning oenophiles to restaurateurs, this is a highly recommended bargain for all collections.--Wendy Miller, Lexington P.L., KY Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Seth McEvoy
Daunting, almost. Far broader, studied and wittily annotated than one might ever imagine for the subject. No whimsy here. Nor is there a provincial slant betraying the author as some wine or food industry insider with an eye on promotion. Johnson-Bell, an American residing in London, is ideally suited to this project. Unlike so many New World wine and food writers, her take is evenly cosmopolitan though just slightly (and rightly) partial to the French. She is a former editor-in-chief of Vintage International Magazine, the author of The Wine Collectors Handbook and conveniently, the wife of a top London chef. Along with sturdy descriptions of thirty commonly known grape varieties, a remarkably extensive chart of the particular grape varieties grown within the top 150 wine regions, Johnson-Bell in Part 1, The Taste of Wine, thoroughly dissects the many variables that influence wine flavor including issues such as soil, climate, yeast type used during fermentation, barrel aging, pruning, age of vines, amongst others. Part 2 of the three part book is titled The Taste of Food and the author utilizes the same discerning methodology. In an introduction to a section titled Cooking and Preparation Methods she writes, "'fast, hot and dry' preserves taste, while 'slow, moderate and moist' intensifies flavors. And when it comes to matching wines, a general guideline is that those foods that are prepared with a light method of cooking (poaching or steaming, for example) would usually require a fruity, lightly acidic wine ..." She immediately continues by discussing the ten most used cooking methods and offers generalizations about how certain wines can successfully be paired to cooking methods. Part 3 includes sixty pages of Food to Wine / Wine to Food charts that go into alarming detail suggesting, for example, almond biscuits to be paired with the little known Moscatel de Valencia, or salt cod balls with a white Rioja. The beauty here is in the thoroughness. Anyone familiar with such matters knows that the circumstance is rare when serious food is unaccompanied by a carefully chosen wine and the superlative precision provided in Pairing Wine and Food should serve to blur the divisiveness often found between foodies and grape nuts. At its best, the palate game (played by both food and wine lovers) requires the most honed tasting skills backed by a prodigious memory. Johnson-Bell has contributed a splendid resource for the novice and expert.
Foreword

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781580801690
Publisher:
Burford Books
Publication date:
06/16/2012
Edition description:
Revised and Updated Edition
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
627,215
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.80(h) x 0.30(d)

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