Paleo Bugs: Survival of the Creepiest

Paleo Bugs: Survival of the Creepiest

by Timothy J. Bradley
     
 

What could be creepier than a 390 million-year-old cockroach? How about a 320 million-year-old millipede that's seven feet long! These crawlies and their many-legged cousins are featured in this follow-up to Paleo Sharks.See more details below

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Overview

What could be creepier than a 390 million-year-old cockroach? How about a 320 million-year-old millipede that's seven feet long! These crawlies and their many-legged cousins are featured in this follow-up to Paleo Sharks.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

KIRKUS REVIEWS, STARRED REVIEW
Elegantly designed and thoughtfully written, this is a worthy companion to the author's Paleo Sharks (2007) and an intriguing step backwards in time for dinosaur fans.

SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL, STARRED REVIEW
Its good science, excellent organization, and eye-catching illustrations make it a fine choice for browsers and researchers.

Children's Literature - Jamaica Johnson Conner
"Imagine: You turn over a rock in your backyard, and little squirmy, crawly creatures race around trying to escape. In the flurry of jointed legs and shiny, armored bodies, you can see ants, spiders, centipedes, a daddy longlegs, and more. Do you run screaming back into the house or do you grab the nearest magnifying glass for a closer look?" After reading Bradley's piece about arthropods, it is clear that he is someone who ran to get his magnifying glass. Following the theory of evolution's time line, Bradley charts the different arthropods that lived during the Paleozoic era, Mesozoic era, and the Cenozoic era compared with the bugs on Earth today. The illustrations complement this well-researched and beautifully-organized text, which offers information about fossilized, prehistoric arthropods' physical descriptions, habits, diets, defense mechanisms, and habitats. Each page provides additional facts about modern arthropods which correspond to those of the prehistoric animals. In addition, this piece includes a table of contents, a helpful diagram which describes the characteristics of arthropods, pronunciation guidelines, a glossary, suggestions for future reading, and Bradley's biography. Students interested in dinosaurs, prehistoric times, and insects will enjoy this informative and visually appealing text. Reviewer: Jamaica Johnson Conner
School Library Journal

Gr 3-7- Large, digitally colored pencil sketches will draw readers into this appealing title about prehistoric arthropods and their relatives. The book is organized into sections about bugs of the Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic eras. Each one begins with a visual and textual vignette in which readers are asked to imagine the sights and sounds of the environment of the time. Then several species of that period are each given a full page or spread that includes a vivid picture and up-to-date information based on the fossil record. A clever visual sidebar compares the size of the bug with a human child, and a second sidebar elucidates a scientific discovery or compares the ancient species to its modern-day descendant. Absolutely necessary pronunciation guides appear as needed. The bibliography is divided into titles for "younger readers" and for "older readers and adults." A few small grammatical glitches do not detract from the value of this title. Its good science, excellent organization, and eye-catching illustrations make it a fine choice for browsers and researchers.-Ellen Heath, Easton Area Public Library, Easton, PA

Kirkus Reviews
Long before the age of dinosaurs, the first arthropods appeared, over 500 million years ago. This attractive and informative guide introduces a variety of these early animals, explaining that some disappeared, some survived nearly unchanged and others evolved into the insects, scorpions, crabs and lobsters we know today. A timeline and helpful description of arthropod characteristics provide a brief introduction. Making clear that scientific understanding in this area is continually developing, Bradley summarizes current thinking about 14 different species of Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic arthropods, introducing them chronologically, one or two at a time on colorful double-page spreads, and providing clear, careful drawings of the creatures on a background appropriate to their environment. Sidebars connect the fossil species to modern ones, and show sizes in comparison to silhouettes of a modern-day "explorer"-a child with a magnifying glass or just a hand. Elegantly designed and thoughtfully written, this is a worthy companion to the author's Paleo Sharks (2007) and an intriguing step backwards in time for dinosaur fans. (glossary, reading suggestions, bibliography) (Nonfiction. 8-12)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780811860222
Publisher:
Chronicle Books LLC
Publication date:
04/16/2008
Series:
Paleo Series
Pages:
48
Sales rank:
741,645
Product dimensions:
8.25(w) x 10.75(h) x 0.37(d)
Lexile:
IG1160L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

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