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Paleo Sharks: Survival of the Strangest
     

Paleo Sharks: Survival of the Strangest

by Timothy J. Bradley
 

If you think today's sharks are fearsome, wait until you see what swam in the oceans hundreds of millions of years ago! Creatures with snouts like saws, and spiral jaws. Sharks so large they could swallow whales whole. Timothy Bradley's vibrant illustrations and razor-sharp prose bring theseferocious fishand their tamer relativesto life with scientific detail.

Overview

If you think today's sharks are fearsome, wait until you see what swam in the oceans hundreds of millions of years ago! Creatures with snouts like saws, and spiral jaws. Sharks so large they could swallow whales whole. Timothy Bradley's vibrant illustrations and razor-sharp prose bring theseferocious fishand their tamer relativesto life with scientific detail. Learn how they survived catastrophic events that completely wiped other creatures out, and see which of their strange adaptations can still be seen in sharks today.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal

Gr 4-7
While chondrichthyans, due to their cartilaginous nature, have been less likely to present as many fossilized remains as their cousins, the bony fishes, enough evidence has been recovered to open fascinating windows into their evolutions (and extinctions) over the last 375 million years. Bradley has sifted through this ancient record and allows readers a peek at some strange creatures. Consider Stethacanthus , displayer of a surfboard-shaped dorsal fin bristling with toothlike spikes, and Helicoprion , dangling a tight spiral of compacted teeth from its lower jaw like some preelectric buzz saw. Accompanied by realistic artwork, the terse text introduces readers to sharks in general and then goes on chronologically to present fragments of data on these long-lost species, about which not much is really known. Included are a handy time line and a size-comparison box for each species (using a human swimmer and a modern great white shark as yardsticks). Bradley also includes some odd cartilaginous "cousins" like Sclerorhynchus and closes with the 50-foot Cenozoic monster, Carcharodon megalodon . For those who have enjoyed Caroline Arnold's Giant Shark: Megalodon, Prehistoric Super Predator (Clarion, 2000) or Deborah Diffily's Jurassic Shark (HarperCollins, 2004), here is a strange new litany to dance trippingly on the tongue.
—Patricia ManningCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
Free of gore, but replete with scenes of large, toothy predators eyeing, or sometimes rushing directly at viewers, this introduction to extinct sharks and their relatives is a definite goosebump-raiser. Billing sharks as "one of the greatest success stories of life on Earth," and scattering deliciously hard-to-pronounce names-Cladoselache, Spathobathis, Sclerorhynchus-liberally through the short passages of text, Bradley mentions what little is known about each predator, but also points out possible or probable parallels in modern species. He groups his fishy fiends by era, going for drama over meticulous detail in depicting them attacking prey or cruising past contemporaneous sea life and adding on each spread to-scale silhouettes of a human diver and a modern great white for comparison. Capped by an all-too-close look at the Cenozoic era's ridiculously immense Carcharodon Megalodon, here's a riveting addition to the dinosaur shelves. Take off design points, though, for placing art and information under the jacket flaps. (glossary, further reading, bibliography) (Nonfiction. 8-10)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780811848787
Publisher:
Chronicle Books LLC
Publication date:
03/08/2007
Series:
Paleo Series
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
IG1090L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Timothy J. Bradley has created hundreds of paleo illustrations for websites, toys, and exhibits in his signature colorful style. The writer-illustrator of The Care and Feeding of Dinosaurs, he lives in Southern California.

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