Palm III and Palmpilot Visual QuickStart Guide

Overview

You've got your desktop and laptop computers; now here comes the palmtop. The PalmPilot from 3Com is the hottest-selling personal digital assistant, the new organizational tool that busy people, from executives to college students, can't be without. More than just an organizer, the PalmPilot does nearly everything a laptop does, including Web connections and running Windows and Macintosh applications. PalmPilot:Visual QuickStart Guide is a concise reference to the PalmPilot that delivers not only the basics of ...

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Overview

You've got your desktop and laptop computers; now here comes the palmtop. The PalmPilot from 3Com is the hottest-selling personal digital assistant, the new organizational tool that busy people, from executives to college students, can't be without. More than just an organizer, the PalmPilot does nearly everything a laptop does, including Web connections and running Windows and Macintosh applications. PalmPilot:Visual QuickStart Guide is a concise reference to the PalmPilot that delivers not only the basics of working with the PalmPilot, but also the best techniques for integrating the PalmPilot into users' lives to improve efficiency, organization, and mobile data management. It not only explains how to use the Date Book, for example, it illustrates how Date Book strategies can be used to improve one's overall time-management skills.The clear, concise writing style delivers the information users need quickly and easily. Why buy a 400 page book that is at least five times heavier than its subject? Also, the "Visual QuickStart Guide" is priced substantially lower than any of the competition on the market! Over 2 million PalmPilots sold already, and their popularity is growing.

Straightforward instructions and advice on getting the most out of your PalmPilot. Real-world examples teach you how to manage your data and become better organized. Priced lower than any competitor.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
An introduction to using the hand-held personal organizer known as the PalmPilot and related software. Presenting images of the screen alongside advice, the author discusses using features such as the date and address books, the Do list, and the memo pad; communicating via emails, the Web, faxes, newsgroups, and telnet; and organizing and managing information. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780201353907
  • Publisher: Peachpit Press
  • Publication date: 10/27/1998
  • Series: Visual QuickStart Guide Series
  • Pages: 264
  • Product dimensions: 6.92 (w) x 8.86 (h) x 0.53 (d)

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Palm III
  • Memory: 2 MB RAM, enough to store approximately 6,000 addresses, 3,000 appointments, 1,500 To Do items, 1,500 memos, and 200 email messages The ROM (Read Only Memory) in the Palm III is comprised of 2 MB of flash ROM, enabling programs to be written to the ROM. The Palm OS and built-in programs are stored in flash ROM. (For more about flash ROM, see Chapter 2.)
  • Infrared beaming capability
  • Palm OS 3.0 and updated versions of the built-in applications
  • A new industrial design that's a bit sleeker than previous models. The serial port on the bottom of the Palm III contains a sliding door (earlier PalmPilots just leave the port exposed). Also, the stylus slides into the back of the unit, rather than the right-hand side (Figure 1.1).

Palm device overview
No matter which Palm device you use, they all share the following characteristics.
Screen
The PalmPilot screen accounts for most of the device. The liquid-crystal display (LCD) is black and white only, and measures 160 pixels by 160 pixels. (Actually, the screen can display four levels of gray, which some developers have taken advantage of, but this capability is currently unsupported by Palm.)
Most important, the screen is touch-sensitive, which is why you can interact with it using a stylus. The screens in the PalmPilots and Palm IIIs feature higher contrast than the early screens in the Pilots (Figure 1.2).
Stylus
The stylus is your main method of interacting with the PalmPilot, though just about anything that isn't sharper than a No. 2 pencil can work (that includes fingers and toes too!). In every device except the Palm III, the stylus is a piece of gray molded plastic that snaps into a slot built into the case; the Palm III's stylus is made of a metal barrel that comes with plastic tip and end pieces that screw at each end.
Tip
Some of the early Palm III styli had a tendency to fall out of their built-in holders. One homemade solution is to wrap a piece of tape around the barrel to increase the tension within the stylus slot.
Silkscreen Graffti area
This is where you input text using Graffiti, the PalmPilot's method of handwriting (see Chapter 2). It's usually referred to as the "silkscreened" area, because the Graffiti input area and the buttons on either side of it are printed on a layer of glass by a silkscreening process. The Applications and Calculator buttons are located here, as well as the triggers for accessing menus and using the Find feature (Figure 1.3).
Application buttons The plastic buttons on the front of the case immediately activate the Date Book, Address Book, To Do List, and Memo Pad. I usually use these buttons to turn on my PalmPilot-in fact, I can't remember the last time I opened the Address Book from within the Palm OS (Figure 1.4).
Tip Under Palm OS 2.0 and later, you can remap the application buttons so they launch any program you have installed (see Chapter 2). If you're using a Pilot 1000 or 5000, use the utility AppHack.
Scroll buttons These up and down buttons are a handy way to scroll through text and other information. On the Palm III, there's actually just one rocker switch instead of two separate buttons.
Power button/backlight The green (or red, if you own a WorkPad) button at the lower left turns the PalmPilot on and off. On all models except the Pilot 1000/ 5000, holding the power button down for two seconds activates the screen's backlight. The PalmPilot will automatically power down after two minutes (you can change the time delay; see Chapter 3).
Contrast wheel
Adjust the screen's contrast using the small wheel at the left side of the PalmPilot (on the Palm III, the wheel is recessed into the back). You'll be surprised at how often you find yourself adjusting the contrast-on earlier models it's easy to nudge the wheel when storing the PalmPilot in many types of cases, plus air temperature and lighting conditions can also affect the contrast.
Tip
On more than one occasion I've had someone bring me their PalmPilot in frustration because it refused to turn on or the screen had gone completely black. A quick adjustment of the contrast wheel brings the "dead" PalmPilot miraculously back to life (it was only "mostly dead").
Reset button
There will come a time when something has happened that renders your PalmPilot unusable (the PalmPilot will stop responding to your input). To get back to business, locate the tiny reset hole in the back of the unit, just above the battery door (Figure 1.5); on the Palm III, look about a third of the way down from the top of the device. Straighten part of a paperclip and insert it into the hole to reset the Palm OS (this is known as a soft reset-it won't erase your data).
HotSync cradle
The ability to synchronize information between the PalmPilot and your desktop computer is one of the reasons for its success. Every PalmPilot comes with an angled HotSync cradle (Figure 1.6). Place the organizer into the cradle so that the connector at its base slides into the serial port. To begin synchronizing, press the HotSync button on the front.

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Table of Contents

Part 1:Using a Palm Device

Chapter 1:Palm Basics
A handful of Palm devices
Palm device overview
Battery use
Screen care
Accessorizing
Hardware and upgrades

Chapter 2:The Palm OS
Navigating the Palm OS
Accessing menus
Onscreen help and tips
Using the onscreen keyboard
Graffiti
Graffiti improvement tips
Setting the Palm OS preferences
Launching applications
Installing applications
Other installation options
Categorizing applications under Palm OS.
Memory management
Deleting applications
The Security application
Beaming applications

Chapter 3:HotSync
HotSync overview
Configuring HotSync Manager
Setting up conduits
Local HotSync
Modem HotSync
Viewing the HotSync Log
Multiple HotSync options
Creating HotSync profiles
File Link
Network HotSync
IRSync (Palm III only)
Working with archived records

Chapter 4:Date Book
Setting preferences and display options
Week view
Month view
Date Book navigation: jumping through time
Entering and deleting Date Book events
"Pencil-in" events
Editing and deleting existing events
Setting alarms
Creating repeating events
Attaching and deleting notes to events
Performing a phone lookup
Marking events Private
Beaming events
Purging old events
Palm Desktop special features
Mac Palm Desktop .v special features

Chapter 5:Address Book
Viewing options
Looking up contacts
Entering and deleting address records
Changing phone field labels
Renaming the custom field labels
Attaching and deleting notes to contacts
Setting up custom categories
Marking contacts as private
Beaming addresses
Importing contacts into Palm Desktop
Palm Desktop special features
Mac Palm Desktop .v special features

Chapter 6:To Do List and Memo Pad
Viewing options
Entering To Do items
Editing To Do items
Adding and deleting notes to tasks
Purging records
Creating and editing memos
Sorting memos
Navigating memos
Categorizing To Do items and memos
Changing the font
Working in Palm Desktop
Mac Palm Desktop .v special features

Chapter 7:Calculator and Expense
Using the Calculator
Copying and pasting calculations
Using Expense
Recording attendees and notes
Viewing options
Specifying currency
Exporting to Excel

Chapter 8:Hacking with HackMaster
Important HackMaster notes
Working with HackMaster
Essential hacks
Part :Communicating with the Outside World

Chapter 9:Email and the Web
Modem hardware
Getting online: two approaches
Email via HotSync: Palm Mail
Direct-dial email
Browse the Web via HotSync: AvantGo
Direct-dial Web browsing

Chapter 10:Pages, Faxes, Newsgroups, Telnet
Receiving pages using the Synapse Pager Card
Sending pages using PageNOW!
Faxing
Newsgroup reading
Telnet

Chapter 11:Protecting Your Data
Palm's built-in security
Custom security options with TealLock
Palm Desktop security
Record-level security

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