Palookaville #20

Palookaville #20

by Seth
     
 

Palookaville #20 is the first volume of the seminal comic book series to be published in book form. The expansion into hardcover from pamphlet is a parallel that illustrates Seth's growth into an award-winning cartoonist, book designer, hobbyist, editor, essayist, and installation artist.

Seth's first autobiographical comics since Palookaville #2

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Overview

Palookaville #20 is the first volume of the seminal comic book series to be published in book form. The expansion into hardcover from pamphlet is a parallel that illustrates Seth's growth into an award-winning cartoonist, book designer, hobbyist, editor, essayist, and installation artist.

Seth's first autobiographical comics since Palookaville #2 and #3 will be featured in #20. Drawing in his loose sketchbook style, similar to his book Wimbledon Green, Seth details his trip to a book festival and his awkward struggle to overcome isolation and communicate with the people around him. Seth continues the serialization of his acclaimed Clyde Fans story line, about which The New York Times Book Review aptly noted, "Seth truly believes in his wares--the little meanings of regular lives." This is, perhaps, nowhere more apparent than in the cartoonist's ongoing three-dimensional rendering of his fictional Dominion City, most recently featured in his book George Sprott. Using sketches, photographs, and an essay, the cartoonist explains why the need to conceptualize the fictional city in sculptures was a natural extension from comics storytelling, and how if he had his way, it would have stayed in his basement forever.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The first volume of the long-running Palookaville series to be published in hardback, this gorgeous compilation underscores Seth’s status as a cartoonist, illustrator, and now installation artist. In part four of the ongoing Clyde Fans saga, set in 1975, the fan company—owned by brothers Simon and Abraham Matchcard—and its supplier are on the verge of bankruptcy. As workers at the Borealis Business Machines plant strike for higher wages, Abraham realizes that the company his father built decades ago is crumbling. The sequence of nearly wordless panels as Abraham leaves the plant, knowing the men have lost their jobs, is heartbreaking. Seth devotes the volume’s middle section to his own multiyear project creating a fictional Canadian city he dubs Dominion. Though it began in his sketchbooks, Dominion soon took the form of elaborate cardboard models, which were displayed at several galleries across Canada. The miniature streetscapes and enlargements of Seth’s sketchbooks detailing his planning stages for the city reflect the same elegiac tone as the lead story. The coda, an illustrated essay detailing Seth’s experiences at a Calgary author festival and his attempts to overcome his social anxiety, provides a strong finish to a memorable volume. (Nov.)
From the Publisher
Praise for George Sprott:

“It’s haunting and exquisite.” JULIA KELLER, Chicago Tribune

“A memorial to a lost age of localism and craft.” DOUGLAS WOLK, The New York Times

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781770460188
Publisher:
Drawn & Quarterly
Publication date:
10/12/2010
Pages:
88
Sales rank:
1,095,793
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 8.60(h) x 0.40(d)

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