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Panama
     

Panama

5.0 1
by Sarah Woods
 

Dictators, cigars and the world’s most famous short-cut? There’s more to Panama than its clichés. More than a third of Panama’s land is protected; it’s home to 940 bird species and some of the world’s most important turtle nesting grounds. Here puma prowl, the drumming of riotous festivals fills the air—and visitor numbers

Overview

Dictators, cigars and the world’s most famous short-cut? There’s more to Panama than its clichés. More than a third of Panama’s land is protected; it’s home to 940 bird species and some of the world’s most important turtle nesting grounds. Here puma prowl, the drumming of riotous festivals fills the air—and visitor numbers are soaring. It’s also a land where timetables are unpredictable and public holidays occur without notice, where places have three names spelled four different ways and roads terminate unannounced. The Bradt guide is the most thorough on the market—and visitors to Panama will need it.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781841622606
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
11/24/2009
Series:
Bradt Travel Guide Series
Edition description:
Second Edition
Pages:
368
Product dimensions:
5.30(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.70(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

1) Today’s interminable number of sub-communities and mini-cultures in Bocas brings a unique mix of gastronomy, music and language to the province. More English speakers are found on the archipelago than anywhere else in Panama, while the indigenous Indians use Ngabere, Spanish or Guari-Guari. An influx of holiday-homers has brought a new era of internationalism to Bocas and 50 different resident nationalities were tallied by the locals in 2008 alone. Such a trans-national character can be a surprise to travellers fresh from the eastern provinces that step from ancient customs into a funky laidback tourist haven, complete with tropical rum shacks and a take-us-as-we-are culture. 2) El Hombre del AviónHe is rarely seen during daylight and is known simply as ‘the aeroplane guy’ but this resident of Isla Colón doesn’t fly planes, he makes them, entirely out of rubbish. Models range in size but can be as big as 2m. Each is painstakingly crafted from salvaged scrap paper, food packaging and tin cans and incorporates intricate operational parts. He favours Panamanian aircraft above all others and most models are replicas of Aeroperlas aeroplanes, usually a Short 360. They are not made for sale and the owner refuses to part with them, although visitors often attempt to persuade him otherwise. A few rather elderly examples of his work are suspended from the roof struts in the bar at the Hotel Angela. Visitors keen to view more recent works stand a good chance by being on Main Street at dusk. This is when the aeroplane guy ‘road tests’ his latest triumph, attaching a piece of string before dragging it along the centre of the road at speed to check moving parts.

Meet the Author

Sarah Woods is an award-winning travel writer. She first discovered Panama in the wake of the canal handover and has since explored the length and breadth of the isthmus. Sarah sponsors a children’s home in the city of David.

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Panama 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago