Pandaemonium: Ethnicity in International Politics / Edition 1

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Overview

Ten years before the Soviet Union collapsed, Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan stood almost alone in predicting its demise. As the intelligence community and cold war analysts churned out statistics demonstrating the enduring strength of the Moscow regime, Moynihan, focusing on ethnic conflict, argued that the end was at hand. Now, with such conflict breaking out across the world, from Central Asia to South Central Los Angeles, he sets forth a general proposition: Far from vanishing, ethnicity has been and will be an elemental force in international politics.
Drawing on a lifetime of scholarship, the Senator provides in Pandaemonium a subtle, richly textured account of the process by which theory has grudgingly begun to adapt to reality. Moynihan—whose previous studies range over thirty years from Beyond the Melting Pot (with Nathan Glazer) to the much acclaimed On the Law of Nations—provides a deep historical look at ethnic conflict around the globe. He shows how the struggles that now absorb our attention have been going on for generations and explain much of modern history. Neither side in the cold war grasped this reality, he writes. Neither the liberal myth of the melting pot nor the Marxist fantasy of proletarian internationalism could account for ethnic conflict, and so the international system stumbled from one set of miscalculations to another.
Toward the close of World War I, Woodrow Wilson declared the "self-determination of peoples" to be an Allied goal for the peace. Toward the end of World War II, Josef Stalin inserted "self-determination of peoples" into Article I of the United Nations Charter, defining "The Purposes" of the new world organization. This process has been going on ever since. The first phase, the breaking up of empire, was relatively peaceful. The second phase, presaged by the 1947 partition of India, is certain to be far more troubled, as fifty to a hundred new countries emerge.
Moynihan argues, however, that a dark age of "ethnic cleansing" is not inevitable; that the dynamics of ethnic conflict can be understood, anticipated, moderated. Ethnic pride can be a source of dignity and of stability, if only its legitimacy is accepted. Moynihan writes in a learned, reflective voice: at times theoretical, but always in the end directed to issues of fierce immediacy. A splendid achievement, Pandaemonium begins the re-education of Western diplomacy.

Ten years before the Soviet Union collapsed, Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan stood almost alone in predicting its demise. Focusing on ethnic conflict, he argued that the end was at hand. Now, with such conflict breaking out across the world, he sets forth a general proposition: that far from vanishing, ethnicity will be an elemental force in international politics.

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Editorial Reviews

Gilbert Taylor
As ever more fissiparous groups make ever more vociferous demands for the attributes of sovereignty, the world's social intellects continue to grapple with the problem's persistence. Moynihan's musings, adapted from lectures delivered at Oxford in 1991, trend closer to a conversation with his own erudition than to fluid exposition of the theories used to explain group identity and clan conflict. The freneticism of footnotes from fellow theoreticians at least compels deference to the speaker's learning, and the senior senator from New York fortunately alights on the two great failures to impose order on barbarian sentiments: Wilson's slogan of "self-determination" and Lenin's notion of a proletarian internationalism. The irredendist wars now being waged where these two efforts were applied (i.e., the Balkans and the former USSR) put a better light on the Hapsburg and Romanov empires, firming up the proposition that 1914 was history's number-one disaster. As an intellectual in politics, Moynihan tries to explain, and not just contain, the reign of the devils of ethnicity, and while not the most coherent tract around, this does take on a matter of widespread concern and even more fervent opinion.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780198277873
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 2/28/2002
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 238
  • Sales rank: 1,042,829
  • Product dimensions: 5.75 (w) x 8.75 (h) x 0.87 (d)

Meet the Author

Daniel Patrick Moynihan is the senior Senator from New York. A former professor of government at Harvard University, he has served as Ambassador to India and to the United Nations, where he represented the United States as President of the Security Council.

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