Pandora's Daughters: The Role and Status of Women in Greek and Roman Antiquity / Edition 1

Pandora's Daughters: The Role and Status of Women in Greek and Roman Antiquity / Edition 1

4.5 2
by Eva Cantarella, Maureen Brown (Trans.) Fant, Maureen B. Fant, Mary Lefkowitz
     
 

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ISBN-10: 080183385X

ISBN-13: 9780801833854

Pub. Date: 12/19/1986

Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press

Expanded and updated for this English-language translation, this book offers the first history of women in ancient Greece and Rome to be written from a legal perspective. Cantarella demonstrates how literary, anecdotal. and judicial sources can and cannot be used to discover that Greek and Roman men thought about women.

Overview

Expanded and updated for this English-language translation, this book offers the first history of women in ancient Greece and Rome to be written from a legal perspective. Cantarella demonstrates how literary, anecdotal. and judicial sources can and cannot be used to discover that Greek and Roman men thought about women.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780801833854
Publisher:
Johns Hopkins University Press
Publication date:
12/19/1986
Series:
Ancient Society and History
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
248
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.56(d)

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Pandora's Daughters: The Role and Status of Women in Greek and Roman Antiquity 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Manirul More than 1 year ago
Lovely...! beautiful.....!.... Just enjoy it.....!
Guest More than 1 year ago
There are books written exclusively for the experts and books written exclusively for everyone else. The best thing about Cantarella's 'Pandora's Daughters' is that it occupies a middle ground. Her chapter on Matriarch is the best I've read anywhere, well researched with the issue understood but all sides, she gives a practicle and realistic answer to the question of such a political condition. Overall however she has a very negative view of women's roles and seems far more concerned with the upper classes than anything else. I don't find this book as realistic in its approach as her 'Bisexuality in the Ancient World'. Her section on Roman women and Christianity is weaker in terms of scholarship and amount of space than her Greece and pre-Greece sections.