Paper Cutouts

Overview

45 spectacular designs for handcrafting with paper cuttings.

The art of paper cutting has a long history. Ancient cuttings, some dating from before 1000 B.C., have been excavated in China's Xinjiang province. Today, paper cutting is a popular handcraft worldwide, with a variety of applications.

Paper Cutouts features 45 designs of stunning motifs that can be used around the home or framed as elegant artworks. Each design includes a full-sized ...

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Overview

45 spectacular designs for handcrafting with paper cuttings.

The art of paper cutting has a long history. Ancient cuttings, some dating from before 1000 B.C., have been excavated in China's Xinjiang province. Today, paper cutting is a popular handcraft worldwide, with a variety of applications.

Paper Cutouts features 45 designs of stunning motifs that can be used around the home or framed as elegant artworks. Each design includes a full-sized template to photocopy in advance. The authors provide step-by-step instructions that explain how to fold and cut, with the intricate designs revealed in white or colored paper.

The designs include:

  • A hanging lamp
  • Room dividers and screens
  • Motif rounds (swans, winter chalets, angels)
  • Motif squares (spring, summer,
    winter, autumn)
  • Wall friezes (under the sea; garden; on the farm)
  • Repeating motifs (bird on a branch, fern, scarabs)
  • Mirror motifs (dragons, herons).

Paper Cutouts is a beautiful how-to guidebook for this ancient handcraft and a unique showcase of modern designs for artists and crafters.

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Editorial Reviews

The Virginian-Pilot - Kay Reynolds
This is a prime find for those who love stenciled designs.
Arlington Heights Daily Herald
All you need to make unique, expensive-looking wall art is colored paper, scissors and a copy of "Paper Cutouts."
Crafts 'n Things
The authors provide 45 dazzling motifs, complete with step-by-step instructions for a variety of designs.... Even a novice can reproduce these beautiful designs just right for modern tastes.
Herald-Leader (Lexington KY) - Susan Smith-Durisek
Full of inspiration and encouragement for future research, this book is a starting point for replacing empty wall space with designs from around the world.
From the Publisher
Study this ancient art and use the fold-out templates to rev up the "wow" factor on your seasonal invitations, greeting cards, wrapping paper and to-and-from tags.
Rainbo Electronic Reviews
Better plan on setting aside a few weekends, because I bet you'll find yourself redecorating room after room once you start with this engaging book.
School Library Journal

Cut-paper ornaments are popular in many countries, particularly China (where they originated), Latin America, and Europe. The complex lacy designs require patience and a steady hand to complete. This is an eclectic selection of full-size patterns with minimal instructions for experienced cutout crafters who must decide for themselves which tools to use and in what order to do the cutting. However, the finished wall and window decorations are worth the effort. Suitable for general crafts collections.


—Constance Ashmore Fairchild

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781554073207
  • Publisher: Firefly Books, Limited
  • Publication date: 9/14/2007
  • Pages: 104
  • Sales rank: 1,252,596
  • Product dimensions: 9.50 (w) x 10.25 (h) x 0.37 (d)

Meet the Author

Hélène Leroux-Hugon graduated from the School of Fine Arts at Angers, France, and is a graphic designer as well as an author.

Juliette Vicart is a self-taught artist and the author of several books.

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Table of Contents

Introduction
How to Proceed
The Patterns

Round of Swans
Round of Chalets
Round of Angels
Round of Amorous Elves
Flowering Tree
Tree of Dancing Rabbits
Tree of Doves
Noah's Tree
Underwater Frieze
By the Side of the Road
Queen Anne's Lace
Spring
Summer
Fall
Winter
Cat-in-a-Egg
Hens-in-a-Egg
Monogrammed Hearts
Christmas Tree
Farm
Climb to Mountain Pastures
Farmyard
Dandelion
Fish Among Water Lilies
Two Cranes Face-to-Face
Poppy Hanging Lamp
Bird and Branch
Wisteria
Two Herons
Two Dragons
Persian
Cypresses
Tree with Arabesques
Beetles
Overhead Panel
Thistles-in-a-Heart
Tree of Life
Ganesha
Four Cranes in Flight
Nasturtiums
Round of Two Carp
Round of Four Fish
Japanese Flowering Quince with Butterflies

Bibliography

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Preface

Introduction Historical Overview of Paper Cutouts

Based on archeological excavations carried out in China, the origins of paper cutting may date back as far as 2,000 years before Christ.

Practiced by Chinese peasants during festivals and major life events, the art of paper cutting was first inspired by symbols of good luck, then, gradually, by flowers, landscapes and scenes of everyday life. Passed on by generation after generation of women, this art form continues to thrive throughout Asia, especially during the celebration of spring marking the Chinese New Year. In Japan, the same technique can be found in kirie (paper cutouts), kirigami (pieces of paper folded and cut out) and katagami (stencils for fabrics).

Although traditionally associated with Asia, this technique is a form of popular expression that has flourished throughout Europe and the Americas in a variety of ways, but always in connection with celebrations.

For example, according to Jewish tradition, the ketubah, or marriage contract, is made of paper that has been cut out, written on in calligraphy and painted. Paper lace pictures are offered at bar mitzvahs.

In South America, the streets and houses are adorned with motifs drawn on colored paper and shaped by a cutout or a punched hole. Polish farmers decorate their houses with colorful wycinanki, comprised of simple or more complicated motifs and inspired by everyday events. The German scherenschnitte and the Dutch papiersnyden show sharply defined peasant scenes cut out of black or white paper.

At the end of the 17th century, nuns in France, Germany and Switzerland cut out pious lacy images called
canivets using a penknife. In 18th century France, the silhouette portrait grew out of the caricatures of the very unpopular minister of finance at the time, Étienne de Silhouette. Two Swiss artists, Johann Jacob Hauswirth (1809-1871), a woodcutter, and Louis Saugy (1871-1953), a mailman and farmer, folded and cut out magnificent scenes of rural life and climbs to mountain pastures.

These few details on the history of paper cutting are offered to the reader who, upon discovering this art form, would like to learn more about it.

Choice of Paper

Used as a support for graphic design and color, paper is a material that offers a great deal of variety in texture, pattern and grain. It invites us to fold it and cut it. More than ever before, paper is used by artists and graphic designers alike, whether amateur or professional.

Paper has many characteristics and there's a wide variety to choose from: paper with a grain, paper without a grain, Japanese paper, Nepalese paper... The list goes on and on. The type of paper you choose is essential and depends on the artistic technique you wish to use.

For paper cutouts such as the ones proposed in this book, choose low-weight paper without a grain, as this will make it easier to fold and cut. Also, it's better to use colorfast paper; it will be a shame if the color of your cutout fades in the light. The size of the sheet of paper will be determined by the pattern you want to make.

Read More Show Less

Introduction

Introduction Historical Overview of Paper Cutouts

Based on archeological excavations carried out in China, the origins of paper cutting may date back as far as 2,000 years before Christ.

Practiced by Chinese peasants during festivals and major life events, the art of paper cutting was first inspired by symbols of good luck, then, gradually, by flowers, landscapes and scenes of everyday life. Passed on by generation after generation of women, this art form continues to thrive throughout Asia, especially during the celebration of spring marking the Chinese New Year. In Japan, the same technique can be found in kirie (paper cutouts), kirigami (pieces of paper folded and cut out) and katagami (stencils for fabrics).

Although traditionally associated with Asia, this technique is a form of popular expression that has flourished throughout Europe and the Americas in a variety of ways, but always in connection with celebrations.

For example, according to Jewish tradition, the ketubah, or marriage contract, is made of paper that has been cut out, written on in calligraphy and painted. Paper lace pictures are offered at bar mitzvahs.

In South America, the streets and houses are adorned with motifs drawn on colored paper and shaped by a cutout or a punched hole. Polish farmers decorate their houses with colorful wycinanki, comprised of simple or more complicated motifs and inspired by everyday events. The German scherenschnitte and the Dutch papiersnyden show sharply defined peasant scenes cut out of black or white paper.

At the end of the 17th century, nuns in France, Germany andSwitzerland cut out pious lacy images called canivets using a penknife. In 18th century France, the silhouette portrait grew out of the caricatures of the very unpopular minister of finance at the time, Étienne de Silhouette. Two Swiss artists, Johann Jacob Hauswirth (1809-1871), a woodcutter, and Louis Saugy (1871-1953), a mailman and farmer, folded and cut out magnificent scenes of rural life and climbs to mountain pastures.

These few details on the history of paper cutting are offered to the reader who, upon discovering this art form, would like to learn more about it.

Choice of Paper

Used as a support for graphic design and color, paper is a material that offers a great deal of variety in texture, pattern and grain. It invites us to fold it and cut it. More than ever before, paper is used by artists and graphic designers alike, whether amateur or professional.

Paper has many characteristics and there's a wide variety to choose from: paper with a grain, paper without a grain, Japanese paper, Nepalese paper... The list goes on and on. The type of paper you choose is essential and depends on the artistic technique you wish to use.

For paper cutouts such as the ones proposed in this book, choose low-weight paper without a grain, as this will make it easier to fold and cut. Also, it's better to use colorfast paper; it will be a shame if the color of your cutout fades in the light. The size of the sheet of paper will be determined by the pattern you want to make.

Read More Show Less

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